Shooters Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just got a 73' model 94 30-30 not long ago and was wondering around how much they're worth. People online are all over the place on price from 400-700. Its in decent shape has some wearing on the bluing. I figured most people on here know more than I do about these types of rifles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,948 Posts
Welcome to the shooters forum.

Best advice I can offer is to visit some of the gun auction sites and see what the bidding is like on rifles of about the same year of manufacturer and in similar condition. Only look at active auctions and not something with a "Buy it now" which has no bids (usually too high priced).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Just my two cents, shooter94 but I have a 1965 model which research tends to indicate is an inferior model because of some shortcuts in material and manufacturing processes. Supposedly methods changed in the 70's - not back to the pre-64 era standards but some improvement, so your rifle is likely still in the post-64 price consideration from a buyer's stand point and having looked for mine for eons, it appears the values here in Canada, range from $350 - $650 Canadian depending upon condition. The average would seem to be $500.00 Canadian. I bought mine for $450.00 plus shipping - it was equipped with a Williams peep sight, receiver bluing gone but average I would say. Let's face it, a model 94 is a treasure irregardless when it was made.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,045 Posts
"decent shape"

That may mean a wide variety of condition for a wide variety of people. Good pics will help determine a ballpark value. Ultimately it comes down to how bad someone wants it and how much they are willing to pay. An internet ego auction battle never hurts. If looking up internet prices, look for what they are selling for, NOT asking. Availability is going down & demand up. My unseen, no model/specifics/grade, price is right guess +/ - 500$???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
Value is also based on location as well. It's not hard to find a nice post 64 Mod 94 in the $300s around where I live. Lots of them around and popular. I have seen very nice ones setting on the racks in shops for a long time - probably because around here almost everyone has one (or more) of them!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hi shooter94- I'm a new member to this forum as well. I bought a 1976 era model 94 at the last gun show I visited back in January. I consider myself VERY lucky since I caught the owner of the gun right after he had arrived at the show. As is typical, he only showed his rifle to the "pros" behind the tables, and getting their low-ball offers. He was also getting his gun bad-mouthed for being a "post-64", to justify the lowball offers he was getting. Even though I wasn't there to buy a gun (I was selling a revolver), I asked him how much he was asking. He prefaced his remarks by telling me, "I know, I know, it was made after 1964, but it's still in good condition. I'm asking $300". I looked it over, and it really was in great condition, with only minor rust freckling on the receiver. He nearly talked me out of buying the rifle my telling me it was a "post-64", but the price seemed good for a rifle in that condition, so I paid him full price, and didn't haggle, thinking I could always sell the gun later, and maybe make a little on it. The first time I cleaned it, I could tell it hadn't been shot much, and still had the original grease. I took the plunge and completely dis-assembled it yesterday. It was absolutely pristine inside the receiver. This is the later model with the cast follower and solid pins instead of hollow roll pins. I decided I will keep this rifle, simply because I'd have to pay much more than $300 to replace it. It's a great shooter, and I'm enjoying it a LOT! If I did decide to sell it, I'd have to get at least $450 for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Hey, shooter94, or texasjarhead, if you don't mind, what is the serial number ( approx. ) on your '73 -'76 vintage '94? My current '94 is # 3660XXX, I know that # 3,000,000 was made in 1970, and I'm trying to nail down the year mine was made. I tried all the forum search features, and couldn't find a listing from anyone here. The '94 Records sticky ultimately goes to the Buffalo Bill Center, and I don't need a $$$ Factory Letter. Thanks for any help!
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
23,860 Posts
Please refer to the "Sticky" titled Gun values in the list of Stickys at the beginning of the "Rifles and Rifle Cartridges" forum here on the site.

Any price mentioned on this board is an educated guess only by the responder - not an appraiser's opinion. As suggested, best bet is to check out the various auction websites for similar firearms.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,268 Posts
Hey, shooter94, or texasjarhead, if you don't mind, what is the serial number ( approx. ) on your '73 -'76 vintage '94? My current '94 is # 3660XXX, I know that # 3,000,000 was made in 1970, and I'm trying to nail down the year mine was made. I tried all the forum search features, and couldn't find a listing from anyone here. The '94 Records sticky ultimately goes to the Buffalo Bill Center, and I don't need a $$$ Factory Letter. Thanks for any help!


Like an older female once told me - You're doing it wrong. :p

The link to the Winchester factory-provided SN dating records, which you've disparaged, indicates that your Model 94 was made in 1972.



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Often a 94 made in the late 70's is a superior gun in my opinion. As a hobby I customise beat up 94's. I like those around serial number 4,500, 000 that have poxed up receivers. I engine turn the receivers, polish up the guts, loosen the magazines and do a quicky trigger job. I also break the corners cause I don't like sharp corners and I make a set of peep sights for them and glue on a recoil pad made from the sole of a shower shoe. The really grungy receivers are due to the fact that they were made of a stainless steel which did not hold bluing very well. I engine turn them but I have seen them that were just sanded to a brushed silver and looked great. The most I have ever paid for one to assault and batter this way is $249.00. My raw material is usually the raggedyest on the rack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,268 Posts
The really grungy receivers are due to the fact that they were made of a stainless steel which did not hold bluing very well.

Respectfully, Winchester never made a Model 1894/94 receiver of stainless steel - especially the post-64's made in the 1970's, which change (1964) was a cost-cutting move by the factory ( stainless steel rifles are more expensive to manufacture, in terms of both material & replacement tooling costs).

The post-64 receiver's were made of a silicate steel powder via the sintering (google) casting process, then iron-plated so they would accept various coatings produced by the Du-Lite Corporation.

http://www.dulite.com/dulite_94_win_oxide.html

The various coatings looked like Brass, Silver, Gold, Pewter, CCH colors, black chrome, and "bluing" that looked like the blue on the barrels, but wasn't.



.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Respectfully, Winchester never made a Model 1894/94 receiver of stainless steel - especially the post-64's made in the 1970's, which change (1964) was a cost-cutting move by the factory ( stainless steel rifles are more expensive to manufacture, in terms of both material & replacement tooling costs).

The post-64 receiver's were made of a silicate steel powder via the sintering (google) casting process, then iron-plated so they would accept various coatings produced by the Du-Lite Corporation.

http://www.dulite.com/dulite_94_win_oxide.html

The various coatings looked like Brass, Silver, Gold, Pewter, CCH colors, black chrome, and "bluing" that looked like the blue on the barrels, but wasn't.



.
I think you could be right about the sintered steel process. These processes use powdered metals mixed together to make steel alloy blends and can eliminate the need for a lot of gigantic equipment to forge receivers out of stock. The materials blended into the steel to toughen or strenghten it may also add stainless charastics to it as an unintended consequence. During the late 60's guns were supposed to be blued, thus the iron plating process. Whatever the reason you waste your time trying to reblue these receivers because blueing is a rust like process. The iron plating doesn't last and rusts like heck. Once I caught on I started buying really good guns at low prices because the receivers were poxed. Those I engine turned stay nice with little care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Ranger 44, thanks for the duolite article which I read. I have only worked with 94's with SN's between 4,000,000 and 5,000,000. These are supposed to be in the blueable range according to the article but I find poxy ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,268 Posts
.


You're certainly welcome, O.F. - There's plenty of old wife's tales going around about the post-64 receivers, that's for sure.


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Years ago I bought a set of Brownell's GUNSMITH KINKS. This series of books is s prinkled with discussions of bluing problems with 94 receivers. Aparentiy Winchester was pretty tight lipped about what was going on with the guns. The first copy was copywrite 1983, the fourth was copywrite 2001. All four of the volumes had articles from gunsmiths about fighting this problem including a note similar to the duolite article. I used to be involved in some projects recovering spent metals out of used baths. In many baths we plated out on stainless specifically because plated on metal peels of stainless. Once I started messing with 94's, I realised that if you could get a good finish on a post 64 Winchester it was not going to last but if you stripped it, it would be pretty forever. I don't even take the old finish all the way off and it gives a sort of mottled look. One I did was to bright for my taste so I put a little of Brownell's Oxypho on it and it got a nice patina. Let me reiterate I am not a professional and just piddle around with my own guns and I haven't figured out picture posting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,011 Posts
.

The values of the Winchester 94 rifles and carbines are "all over the place" but condition of the guns are all over the place. As Kdub said, we are not appraisers and if we were it would have to be a hands on event.

Asking the value of a Winchester 94 is somewhat like asking how big is a dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
For $400 to $700 you can buy a pretty nice used pre 64 Win. mod. 94...A post 64 gun in Idaho can be had for next to nothing, I saw one a couplel of months ago in one of our pawn shops for $240. well used but was a decent gun and well cared for...
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top