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Discussion Starter #1
i was wondering since i know little about guns i would like to know of a good bolt action rifle for hunting game as big as wild boar,kangaroos and feral goats to foxes and rabbits and .... are guns restricted to being centerfire or rimfire?
 

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Welcome to the forum almost.

It seems that you may be in Austrailia? What with the mention of kangaroos.

I don't know the gun laws there at all but I am sure someone will help you. From the little that I have read it seems as if centerfires are used there for such game.

The most common sense calibers are the most popular ones that are reasonable in size. They are usually military calibers as well such as the 308 Win., 30-06 Springfield. They may be designated there by a metric name.

There could be other laws too such as having a hunting license.
 

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If you are planning on hunting 'roos, the you must be a fellow Aussie.

I have been having this same discussion in another topic on this page ("First Rifle - What to get?"), except I am looking more at target shooting.

I am no expert, as I am a newbie as well, but hunting boar, roos and rabbits with the same gun might up making a mess of the bunnies.

You will need a hunting licence, or know someone with lots of private land to shoot on. As for centrefire and rimfire, in Victoria, Class A licence covers rimfire and air rifles only, Class B allows centrefire (non self loading) and rimfire rifles.
 

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Assuming from you post that your from down under -- Australia. Can't answer you question upon restriction as that would apply to your country. Concerning which rifle too buy requires knowledge of what ammunition is readly available for purchase. Along with that would be pricing of that ammunition.

Wild boar, kangaroos and feral goats would best be taken with a larger caliber rifle. Possible calibers would be the 270's, 7mm's and 30 calibers. Even the 303 British would be acceptable. Foxes and rabbits could be taken with smaller caliber like you 22 calibers up through the 6.5mm calibers.

Too make a good recommendation more information would be needed such as how much hunting you would do in each general catagory of animals. This would translate into potential amount of ammunition expended. Few rounds expended on each animal species then about any caliber rifle will work. Some will totally destroy any edible meat. If you will be hunting literally hundreds of any particular species then it would be cost efective to caliber up for that species.

Another words if your going to hunt rabbits mainly then something like a 22 rimfire or some of the smaller caliber centerfire rifles like 22 Hornet, 222 or 223 Remington would be excellant choices. They would not be viable choices for the larger game. The larger game would mandate the larger calibers. In experienced hands several medium caliber rifles could be used.

If you were wanting this rifle for limited usage then several good all round calibers would be the 243's/6mm's or 25 calibers. Too make any type of solid recommendation more information would be needed.
 

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must be aussie night, up here most people use the 223 or 22-250 for roos rabbits and foxes the next would be the 308 for hogs but the other 2 will do the job at close ranges. in a rim fire the 22 mag will pop the bunnies and foxes.
 

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If the small game will be eaten, I'd suggest a rimfire cartridge like the 22LR, 17HMR or 22WMR. For the larger critters, including hogs, I'd start with something in the 6.5mm range, and go up from there.

One option is a T/C Encore with 2 barrels...a rimfire for the smaller stuff and maybe a 260 Remington for the big game on your list.
 

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You should be able to find a .303 as easily as we can here in Canada. It will do the job nicely.
If you want to support your local economy, Australian Arms makes a very nice looking rifle,
a modernised Lee Enfield, that shoots a .308 round. Have a peek here:
http://www.australianinternationalarms.com.au/
 

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well I know noting of the roo's, but I would think that a .25-06, (assuming you can do your part) would be sufficent, but then it's kinda in the middle of what you want, I'd suggest getting 2 rifles, a .22LR and a 7MM Rem Mag (one of my personal favorites)
 

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Almost welcome to the forum! I had several calibers in mind but that "wild-bore" issue leaves to stick to my guns and say stay with a .308 Winchester or .303 British. These will certainly leave you in good shape on the 2 largest animals. They also will be a good rifle for shooting at targets down range as well. Good Luck Mate!:D
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If the small game will be eaten, I'd suggest a rimfire cartridge like the 22LR, 17HMR or 22WMR. For the larger critters, including hogs, I'd start with something in the 6.5mm range, and go up from there.

One option is a T/C Encore with 2 barrels...a rimfire for the smaller stuff and maybe a 260 Remington for the big game on your list.
if i shoot with the 260 remington will it make too much of a mess to eat / keep the pelts? or does that depend on the bullet? do you have to shoot with a certain size bullet depending on the rifle?
 

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if i shoot with the 260 remington will it make too much of a mess to eat / keep the pelts? or does that depend on the bullet? do you have to shoot with a certain size bullet depending on the rifle?
This would depend on the bullet construction. I have a .260 Remington that I use to hunt whitetail deer here in the SouthEastern USA. I use "heavy" bullets (compared to what is recommended for whitetails of size found around here). 120gr are considered 'ideal' but I use 140gr because depending on where I'm hunting, there's a good chance to see a feral pig (some big ones even.. there have been some boars up to 200kg killed where I hunt) and I want good penetration.

I use 140gr Core-Lokt factory loads and get good results. So far, it's been 6.5mm going in and 10mm to 12mm coming out the other side. But... I use those bullets because of the expansion. All whitetails I kill are destined for my freezer and so far, I've found that what I shoot seems to perform very well while not destroying that much meat. I shoot through the ribs, though, so I don't spoil as much meat. Although, one I shot last year was through the front shoulder on both sides but it still didn't seem to tear up the meat like my .30-06 would have.

The only thing about 'certain size bullet' depends on the twist in your barrel. Heavy (long) bullets need a faster twist. I ordered 1:8" twist in my barrel. That's good for 140gr (what I had planned to shoot) and still good for 120gr. If you are going to stick with 120gr or lighter, you can use 1:9". 100gr and lighter you can use 1:10". Pick your bullet weight depending on your application. According to 'the book', 100gr bullets are good for varmints and such, 120gr is good for medium game (whitetail deer, mule deer, feral pigs, etc), and 140gr is also good for medium game that's larger or tougher (whitetail deer, mule deer, feral pigs). I like heavy for caliber bullets so I use 140gr Remington Core-Lokt factory loads advertised at 2750fps MV. I do have some 120gr but haven't used them hunting yet.

For keeping pelts, you might need to select the right bullet. These Core-Lokts make holes in both sides of deer and the exit hole has some size to it. Whether you might want to use a light-weight frangible or a FMJ or something, I dunno. I have almost no experience varmint hunting or hunting for pelts. You may need to reload your own so you can get exactly the bullet you want to use.

Just for information, my .260 Remington is a 1:8" twist, 24" MGM barrel on a Thompson Center Encore Pro Hunter frame. I have a 3x9 scope on it. It has all but retired my .30-06 and .270Win rifles ;)
 

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if i shoot with the 260 remington will it make too much of a mess to eat / keep the pelts? or does that depend on the bullet? do you have to shoot with a certain size bullet depending on the rifle?
On big game animals that will/may be eaten, you aim where the edible meat is not, although you still may lose some as a result of being bloodshot. This is normal for big game rifles. If you want to save pelts from foxes and other fur-bearing animals, there are better cartridges for that purpose. At reasonable ranges, the 22WMR would do a good job. You might also be able to use a 6.5mm solid bullet, in the 260 Remington, if you are shooting where there is a safe back-drop.

In the US, we hunt small, edible game with a rimfire cartridge in 22 or 17 caliber, we hunt varmints/fur-bearing animals with cartridges like the 223 Remington or 204 Ruger (or even smaller, to prevent pelt damage), and we hunt big game with a centerfire cartridge in 24 to 45 caliber, generally.
 

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I have an Encore and it is a good shooter, but I must offer a different opinion on the correct way to go here. Top accuracy in an Encore when switching barrels requires a lot of work. Rather than an Encore with 2 barrels with one of those being a .22LR and one a center fire, I would recommend getting two bolt guns. One would be a Marlin bolt action in .22LR or .22 MMR. The second would be a center fire bolt gun in .243, .260, 7-08, or .308. Marlin .22s are not expensive and their bolt action ones shoot very well. Assuming you get a reasonable priced center fire bolt gun, I think you will find this 2-gun option just as economical as an Encore with two like barrels. I promise you, that this two gun option is more convenient and more consistently accurate with less sighting in when you go from one caliber to the other.
 

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1 ST Gun

Remington Model 700 SPS or A CDL in a 243 Or 270 would be great choices if you ever going to hunt elk or for that matter a moose i would go with a 270 you can handle it and cant go wrong
 

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I wouldn't over do the caliber as much as some are sugesting. Something between .222 and .243. Roo's take very little to kill. They should be head shot or well placed chest shots will do. There isn't much to a roo where you should be aiming. The only thing you will need much gun for is if you are planing on finding some bigger pigs, then a .243 should be your min.
Everyone should have a .22 as well. It should be a rule.
What part of the country are you in.
 

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How about a 25/06 or a 6.5/06 for those folks down under? I got em both and they are tons of fun to shoot and will take big game up to Elk with the right bullet. You can bust an speed goat at 400 yards with either caliber rifles and they don't KICK the blazes out of your upper body.;) :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I wouldn't over do the caliber as much as some are sugesting. Something between .222 and .243. Roo's take very little to kill. They should be head shot or well placed chest shots will do. There isn't much to a roo where you should be aiming. The only thing you will need much gun for is if you are planing on finding some bigger pigs, then a .243 should be your min.
Everyone should have a .22 as well. It should be a rule.
What part of the country are you in.
im in vic your suggestion of 243 is good from feral dogs to pigs? but a .22 for rabbits, cats n foxes?
 

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How about a 25/06 or a 6.5/06 for those folks down under? I got em both and they are tons of fun to shoot and will take big game up to Elk with the right bullet. You can bust an speed goat at 400 yards with either caliber rifles and they don't KICK the blazes out of your upper body.;) :cool:
25/06 6.5/06 these are calibres? if so .. what gun would suit?
 
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