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Hello from Scotland~

Ive always been a hunter but due to hassle with our police i was advised to join a Rifle club which i did.

The club uses the 200 yard firing point most of the time. i had only ever shot fox at this kind of range say up to 250 max with a .243 and certinally never shot a Deer at 200 yards.

As i joined the club i got a Miroku M-bolt Extreme in .308 200 yards seemed a long way at first but now my .308 and i can bang bull after bull infact it seems a bit to easy at times. The regular practice at 200 yards has improved my confidence not only in the rifle but also in my ability.

Well the other day i got a chance to fire from the 500 yard firing point i thought 200 yards was a long way, boy ! 500 yards is certinally a darn sight longer !

My Miroku has a light weight 22" barrel not really ment for such work but after 4 rounds to figure out drop i found the tip of the thick post on my Tasco titan 3-12 X 52 mm was bang on at 500 yards and my fith 180 gn Nosler found the bull !

Boy i was chuffed to bits ! Like a dog with two tails !

500 yards does not now seem as long as it once did and 200 yards seems positively close range !

Such practice gives me such confidence in my rifle and ammo especially when its task is hunting Deer at under 100 yards !

Englander

:D :D :D
 
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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Right you are! First time I blew up a gallon (plastic) jug filled with water at 500 yards, it was quite a thrill.

Wouldn't think of shooting game at that range but it's fun with targets.

Now if you can just imagine shooting at big rocks at 200-300 yards... with a revolver... now that's fun!
 

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I've never understood the fascination with slang folks have from the British isles, it would seem that it's not exclusive to the uneducated like here in the states. I understand that it's part of the culture there but they seem unable to grasp that they should probably refrain from it when conversing with Americans with a middle school education and above least be thought of as ignorant. Maybe they don't care, that would be more typical of there attitudes towards us. They always seem to be chuffing this or that, strange word methinks.
They also have this strange language most Americans are unaware of whereas nothing is ever spoken to in the first person, sometimes in rhyming phrases using mostly synonyms and metaphors.I assume it was developed by miscreants to shield there criminal behavior from the populace.











Just kidding ole chap!!!;)
 

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I've never understood the fascination with slang folks have from the British isles, it would seem that it's not exclusive to the uneducated like here in the states. I understand that it's part of the culture there but they seem unable to grasp that they should probably refrain from it when conversing with Americans with a middle school education and above least be thought of as ignorant. Maybe they don't care, that would be more typical of there attitudes towards us.











Just kidding ole chap!!!;)
Very old thread!

I'm from the South. There are a LOT of sayings that I understand, but have noticed my fellow countrymen in other parts of the USA do not!

The worst ones are rather hilarious. Such as being in a room with individuals from all over the country and another gentleman from the south had an upset stomach. Came out and made the statement "I could crap through a screen door and not hit a single wire". This was a story told to me by a friend in the navy.

Many did not understand a word that he said, but the one who could did not stop laughing. Sadly, the one who understood it was my very good friend.

A big one here in west Texas and NM is "Coke" as we say it, as in Coca-cola. It literally means any carbonated soft drink. Not just Coca-cola. I hear lots of people say "Pop" in Colorado.

The biggest two are "Howdy" and "Y'all". I say those a lot and get lots of laughs when I'm traveling.

There are a lot of words that change based on where you live. From animals, firearms, car parts, etc...

"English" is not English based on where you may live in comparison to where the other person lives. Hence why I tend to not agree with a lot of Grammar police. Language is highly subjective and varies greatly from location to location.

And yes, the further you manage to make your shooting skill proficient, the easier it seems to shoot inside that range.

Edit: We've been told not to say "Mam" to the ladies on the phone at work over in Minnesota as they don't like it... saying "Sir" and "Mam" is a big deal and a sign of respect here. They explained it to me a while back why they don't like it, but I can't remember at the moment why.
 

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Kevin, you "crack me up":D


Travel throughout the British Isles and you will find many different versions of English spoken, much like a foreign language. During my many visits to the USA, the different uses of English caused my wife and myself much amusement and I have to admit that more than often on seeing a friend my response would be, " How y'alll doin " as a more than a bit of Texas has rubbed off on me. Miss it greatly.


Mam and Sir .. the Ranch Foreman down in Texas always referred to Freda and I as Mam or Sir and I constantly would say, "Gary, my name is Neville" and he would reply, "Yes, I know it is Sir". Such good country manners.
 

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In the course of doing my job, I deal with the general public non-stop. EVERYONE'S either "sir" or "ma'am"........and that's in the Northeast. But it IS a lot more prevalent as a general way of life in the South. And, quite frankly, I like it. Not enough respect in our culture anymore.

Around here, the big one is "you'ns" or "yinz"............. the west Pennsylvania equivalent to "y'all".......

It's so deeply rooted that folks from Pittsburgh and a few surrounding counties are referred to as "yinzers".
 

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Stationed in Germany there was an Endlish lady married to a GI, worked in the base bowling alley. One of her favorite expressions was, "Knock me up in the morning"! What do ya think that means?
 

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One of her favorite expressions was, "Knock me up in the morning!" What do ya think that means?
I'd say it means to contact her in the morning.
 

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Stationed in Germany there was an Endlish lady married to a GI, worked in the base bowling alley. One of her favorite expressions was, "Knock me up in the morning"! What do ya think that means?
Sus told a story about that very thing when he and the wife was visiting the US. I laughed so can imagine the effect it had for those present! :D

I live near the airbase so run into people from all over the country who are stationed here. Its amazing the differences in accents, terms and slang a person hears. The southern stuff just crept in. A South Dakota boy would never say y'all and now I do it all the time! :eek:
 

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One of her favorite expressions was, "Knock me up in the morning"! What do ya think that means?
Here, in MY rather hick corner of the world, that is what we call a "proposition".............. :D

Obviously we subscribe very little to the King's English, hereabouts
 

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Born and raised in Michigan.:cool:
When I joined the Army many thought I was from the south:(, those from the south thought I was from New England.:eek:

After training I was sent to Panama, the longer I was there the more Spanish I learned.
After 3-4 years people I talked to on the phone thought I was from Porto Rico or Cuba (I wasn't that good). Now after well over thirty years of not speaking it I've lost most of what I knew.
 

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I was in a meeting a few months back when one of my associates asked our manager (who is based in England) why they insist on using the letter "s" in words like "realise" or "visualise". Without missing a beat, our manager said "because we invented the language".

It took several minutes for the laughter to subside. :)
 

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I was in a meeting a few months back when one of my associates asked our manager (who is based in England) why they insist on using the letter "s" in words like "realise" or "visualise". Without missing a beat, our manager said "because we invented the language".

It took several minutes for the laughter to subside. :)
They invented it.................

It took a bunch of Yinzers to perfect it. :D
 
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