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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Savage 111 in 22-250. It has just enough recoil that I can't follow my own shots on pdogs. I was wondering if anyone knows how well it would work or has had experience drilling out parts of the stock and filling it with lead or metal. Or, does anyone else know any better options?

Any help would be appreciated as pdog shooting is twice as fun when you can see all your hits.

Thanks
 

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If you reload then go with the super light bullets and don't expect 600 yd performance. I think Sierra makes a 35 or 38 gr bullet, should be about right. pdogs don't need cannon rounds to die so load down a little and enjoy. if buying commercial go with light weight slugs. don't like adding weight to a rifle cuz it changes the harmonics and could alter accuracy and is a pain to carry if i want to walkabout.
 

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Are you shooting prone or from a table ?

I used to reduce felt recoil on my 308 Sniper rifle by simply cutting a small slot in the ground to lodge the heel of the butt in. I then lay sideways to sight and the recoil was absorbed by the ground not my shoulder. Front end was supported by short bipod. When I first did this my instructors could not work out how I was suddenly getting some stunning groups at 300 and 400yrds. Of course because I wasn't actually supporting the rifle only my trigger finger and right hand and just my cheek was actually in contact with the rifle. Of course in real life situation this would not be possible but we were always looking for ways to reduce human input and stabilize the rifle.
Many moons ago I saw a 'gadget' which you could insert into your stock from the butt pad end having drilled a hole which was said to reduce recoil. It was like a shock absorber. I haven't seen them advertised for some time.
 

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Many on the forum object to muzzle-brakes, but that is a possible solution. Years ago I had a lightweight .30-06 with a muzzle-brake that reduced the recoil sufficiently that I could see the bullets hit.
 

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Actually seeing hits is the primary reason many people myself included use muzzel brakes.
Theres no doubt a brake would help in your situation. That said i dont use one on my varmit
weight 22/250ai and i have no problem seeing hits on prairie dog shots with it. I use 69 gr
bullets so the recoil would be slightly more than with lighter ones. I can see where with a
standard version rifle the muzzel jump could be enough to make it hard seeing the hits.
Shooting with a bipod from a bench can actually worsen the problem in my opinion. You could
try a bungee pulled down just in front of the action to help eliminate jump. We find that helps on some heavy recoiling guns.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I do reload but I prefer to keep my bullet weights around 62 grains. I've noticed that a strong wind really throws off the 40 grain bullets even at 250-300 yards.

I did find one of those mercury tubes that you put in the back of the stock. Does anyone have any experience with those?

A muzzle break is always an option too since I wear hearing protection anyways when shooting pdogs and the extra noise won't be a problem.
 

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Installed the mercury tubes into a Remington 870 slug gun some years back - matter of fact, put two of them in! Helped reduce the recoil, but really made the shotgun butt heavy.

Someone makes a recoil pad as an aftermarket add-on that has springs between the pad and stock. Might do a Google search and see what you can find.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
treecarcus- how does adding weight to the stock of the rifle affect the accuracy if it isn't in contact with the barrel?
I don't understand how it would but then again I am young and inexperienced.
Just looking to learn!
 

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I live too far east, myself, to hunt 'dogs, but I think the muzzle brake idea has merit. It most likely is the muzzle climbing part of the recoil impulse that is destroying your sight picture! They do make brakes with all the holes on top, thereby pushing the rifle down, and straight back. That 22-250 probably has only about eight pounds of free recoil, so that solution MIGHT save your sight picture.
 

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Many of the muzzle brakes have holes on top and not on the botton so they do not kick up dust clouds.

Also the holes are canted rearward slightly to help reduce the recoil impulse. As far as the added noise go's -- you do wear ear protection when hunting. I did when I was shooting PD's.
 

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About time you guys over there got to persuading your officials that ownership of a suppressor/moderator/silencer whatever you want to call them is a good idea because one of these new suppressors on your 22-250 would solve all your problems I'm sure. They really are getting small these days. I have just fitted one to my 7-30 Waters which is no more than 4 inches long and in stainless steel. Certainly reduces noise and felt recoil with the small extra weight upfront on the 16 1/2 inch barrel also helping control any muzzle jump. I can see the bullet strike with that ,no problem. Added to that you would not need hearing protection.
 

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It's easy to add lead weight to a rifle. Buy a bag of lead shot. You can route out part of the forearm and drill 1/2" holes in the butt stock. Mix the shot with slow setting epoxy and lay it in the routed out area of the forearm and holes in the butt stock. 1/4 to 1/2# in the forearm and 1/2 to 1# in the butt stock will dampen the recoil enough but not change the balance.
 

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I live too far east, myself, to hunt 'dogs, but I think the muzzle brake idea has merit. It most likely is the muzzle climbing part of the recoil impulse that is destroying your sight picture! They do make brakes with all the holes on top, thereby pushing the rifle down, and straight back. That 22-250 probably has only about eight pounds of free recoil, so that solution MIGHT save your sight picture.
It would be hard to get further east than Vero Beach Fl. Carroll and thats my home for about
8 mos of the year. Its only about 1500 miles to some real decent prairie dog towns and frankly its worth the ride.
 

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My Savage 11FNS 22-250 was a PAIN to shoot, the recoil was awful!, I swapped out the pencil barrel for a 26" bull barrel and the Tupperware stock for a Boyd's thumb hole varmint stock, it weighs over #12 now and is MUCH more pleasant to shoot!
 

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Why would some folks be against muzzle brakes?

Because they're ugly on sporting guns, IMO. I wouldn't have one if they were free.
 

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I love muzzle brakes, even on small caliber rifles. Why would some folks be against muzzle brakes?
Because most folks are city dwellers, so when they go shooting they sit on a concrete bench under a tin roof. A muzzle brake that works well, can really rattle the cage of the guy beside it.
 
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The Shadow
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Schnookered again...
Et tu, Jackie?!

🤦‍♂️
 
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