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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if any of you folks have any personal experience with the .22 CHeetah? I think it looks like one heckuva fun little thing. I don't plan on adding one to my arsenal anytime soon, but it WOULD be kind of interesting...
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Moved it for ya.
 

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I don't have any personal experience with that cartridge, but it looks like a .308 Winchester case, necked down to .223? That seems like it would be incredibly over-bore, but I suppose guys drool over such rounds on a regular basis. Personally, having shot the 225 Win, 220 Swift and 22-250, I can't imagine what using even more powder in a 22 will achieve. I think the 223WSSM failure sorta answered that question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks a bunch Mike!

I don't have any personal experience with that cartridge, but it looks like a .308 Winchester case, necked down to .223? That seems like it would be incredibly over-bore, but I suppose guys drool over such rounds on a regular basis. Personally, having shot the 225 Win, 220 Swift and 22-250, I can't imagine what using even more powder in a 22 will achieve. I think the 223WSSM failure sorta answered that question.
Yes, essentially. I think it IS cramming way too much powder in there for what the neck can reasonably support, but it should still be interesting (aside from cleaning it every third shot). My dad was telling me about the .22 CHeetah the other day...he said our ranch hand had one and swore by it (a little old indian fellow named Fred. He taught us kids everything there was to know about nature!). My father recalled those 40 grain bullets leaving the muzzle at nearly 4700 fps. That's fast.

I thought the WSSM's failure was more attributed to feeding problems?
 

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Yes, essentially. I think it IS cramming way too much powder in there for what the neck can reasonably support, but it should still be interesting (aside from cleaning it every third shot). My dad was telling me about the .22 CHeetah the other day...he said our ranch hand had one and swore by it (a little old indian fellow named Fred. He taught us kids everything there was to know about nature!). My father recalled those 40 grain bullets leaving the muzzle at nearly 4700 fps. That's fast.

I thought the WSSM's failure was more attributed to feeding problems?
Wow, that is really screaming, for a little 22 bullet! I wonder if they need a heavier jacket, just to keep from disintegrating, in flight? From what I've read and heard from others, the WSSM line had feed problems, but they were also (predictably) hard on throats/barrels. Being a frugal man, I just can't see buying a new barrel every three to five thousands rounds, especially when the gain in performance over more moderate offerings has very little practical application.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
And I guess that's the key...PRACTICAL application. I guess honestly, the only reason for owning a gun like that (in my opinion, anyway!) is to add another dimension to your shooting. The .204 will kill gophers just as dead and operate fine in most similar situations, from what I understand. The .22-250 will kills coyotes, the .270 will kill deer, the .300 WM will kill grizzlies...and on, and on...

I was just going through my movie collection, having remembered hearing the name CHeetah before. I found it on Randy Anderson's "The Truth Calling All Coyotes"...can't remember which one again, maybe 4. The coyote is about 40 yards out, and when his shooter squeezes the trigger, the coyote literally reacts to the shot before the barrel even belches smoke.

As for the heavier jacket, it would probably be useful, but doubt it's used...look at the .17 Remington. A 20 grain bullet at, what... 4400 fps?
 

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I recall reading an article about this some time ago. It was by a man that used it to cull various forms of plains game in South Africa if I remember right. It also seemed to me that he was getting around 4600+ with 40 grainers. He also used some special bullets with thicker jackets that were moly coated as he had problems with jackets literally spinning off about 30 feet from the muzzle. He also included pictures of its effect on game, meat destruction was ridiculous. I'll have to surf around and try to find the article again and post it....
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, I guess if you get a light bullet like that, meant to fragment instantly to kill, say, a coyote...I guess you can't expect much for deer, nevermind African game.
 

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I shoot a 22/243 which is very close to a 22 cheeta. there have been many 22 wildcats made form the 243 brass like the middlested. Personally I love it. I shoot 75 gr hornady amax through mine. I get excellent results from about 3450 fts with little signs of pressure. I have got in the upper 3500's but suffered accuracy and it took several more grains of powder to do. A 100 fps was not worth it to me personally. I have killed white tail dead in there track and many coyotes at long ranges with little hold over. My gun is a true hunting rifle built on a 700 rem action that will shoot low .300" groups off the rest all day. No one I know that has built this gun regrets it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Can honestly say I've never heard of it...should be a great caliber, and certainly wouldn't have to clean the gun every third shot like you do (apparently) with the CHeetah!
 

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The other major difference is that the CHeetah was designed with a small primer pocket, the belief being that a milder spark would be better. With easy-to-ignite extruded powders, that might have worked out, but with almost any spherical powder (in the amounts the case could hold) there were reports of hang-fires and poor ignition. That opened the spectre of possible pressure excursions - and pretty much killed any further interest in the round.

It was also distinctly over bore capacity, as mentioned. The only major benefit of such a creation is (in my very personal opinion) to imply that one is more manly because his bullets fly faster.
 
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