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I have started reloading 223 using cartridges that I shot with my AR. I am using a Lee single stage press and noticed when starting that sometimes the small rifle primer seated easily and other times not. Looking at the ones that seated easily i found the primer hole clean and looking like it was formed when the case was manufactured. For the ones being more difficult I see what looks like the outside of the primer still in the case. It almost looks like the original primers had two outside bands around the primer. When the primer was removed with the press it less the outer most ring inside the case. It makes it harder to insert the new primer. The cases are stamped LC that are the problem. Has anyone else run into this issue and is there an easy way to remove the ring left inside the primer pocket?
 

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LC (Lake City) stakes the primer in place for reliability, as does other the other mil spec ammo sources. You need to get a small rifle primer reamer to ream it before reloading.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

As the other fellows have commented, military brass (except military Match brass) has its primers crimped. This practice was begun in th e 1920's because of backed out primers getting loose in machine guns and jamming the mechanism. LC is for the Lake City Army Ammunition Plant, in Lake City, MO, so these are definitely military. So what you've encountered is normal.

In addition to the tools they mentioned, there are also tools for swaging the crimps out. I suggest you search You Tube for videos on removing primer pocket crimps. Pretty much everything available for the job is demonstrated there.

The primer pocket bench type swaging tools are good for both uniformity and speed, but cost the most. A profile cutter, like the Wilson trimmer accessory does the prettiest job, but is slowest. The hand turned primer pocket reamers do a fair job, but it's easiest to tilt those off-axis, widening the pocket more than you meant to or making it slightly oval. The simple chamfer tool on a drill has proven satisfactory for many, but unless you do it on a drill press with a stop, it will be a little less regular as to depth than some of the specialty tools.
 

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Hey Alan,

I asked the same question some time ago and decided to take Unclenick's advice and get the primer pocket swager. I also have the reamer, which I purchased before asking this forum thier opinion, but changed my mind after seeing the pros and cons and opportunity to mess something up :eek: The RCBS swager kit costs about $38, but it comes with the stuff to swage small and large rifle primers. I can attest that once you get it set up you can fly through cases pretty quick, so it's well worth the cash.

I hope this helps, and welcome to the forum!!
 
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