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Ok im new to the forum and have a noob question. Ive been shooting all my life but my recent purchase of my savage 12 .223 has me baffled. I have an 8x32 scope with turrets and mil dots shooting hand loaded nosler 60 gn ballistic tips and 24.5 gn of varget. Now when its zeroed at 100 yards I can put the first mil dot on target at 200 yards and be right on but if i start messing with the turret i cant seem to get it close. I guess i didnt have enough ammo loaded up to sight it in and play with the turrets. So my question is where around about should i be on the turret at 200 when its dropping one mil dot. The scope is 1/8 moa as well. Thanks in advance for the help.
 

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I am on vacation at the moment and don't have access to any of my stuff. There should be some instructions that came with the scope. If that is not available, I am sure either someone here on this forum can explain it or you can find an explanation of "mil-dots" somewhere on the internet. The distance between the crosshairs center and the first mil-dot is dependent on the power of the scope and the distance to the target. With a 1/8 MOA adjustment on the scope, it is going to take about 8 clicks to move the point of impact one inch at 100 yards. I would guess with your bullet and load, that amounts to shooting about 2 inches high at 100 yards to be on target at 200, or 16 clicks. But wait for an "expert" to answer who has the mil-dot stuff right in front of him.
 

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Best advice (if the instructions don't work) is to put the gun in a vice with the crosshair on the 200yd target. Turn the elevation turret until the first mil dot (above the crosshair) is on the target at 200, then put the crosshair on the target and you should be there. Write down the number of turns it took to get you there from zero, and you'll know how your turrets work. You didn't mention whether the turrets are in MOA or mil-dot. That could be the issue, because 1 mil is 3.6" at 100yds (.1 Mil = .36"), 1 MOA is 1.047" at 100yds (1/4 MOA = ~.25"). Therefore, at 200yds, if your turrets are MOA, and 1 Mil puts you dead on, you're holding over approximately 7.2" at 200yds, so you'll need to adjust your turrets (in terms of MOA) by the same amount, or distance. ASSUMING you're correct that your holdover is 7.2" at 100yds, the number of 1/4 MOA clicks on your elevation turret (assuming, again, that your scope is adjusted in MOA's, not Mils), you would need to turn 14 or 15 clicks (1/4 MOA at 200yds, is appx 1/2"). In mils, your adjustment should be .1 Mil = .72" so you would only need to turn your scope exactly 10 clicks, or 1 Mil in adjustment. Hope this helps.

Deck
 

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OK, I am back home now and can look up some stuff. With a fixed power scope that is correctly calibrated, the distance between the dots in the scope is one mil, 3.6" at 100 yards or 7.2" at 200 yards as Deck said. So, if the crosshairs are zeroed at 100 yards and you are hitting at 200 yards on the first mil dot below the crosshairs, then that's a difference of 7.2". Now, the question arises regarding the clicks on our turrets. If they are truly 1/8 minute of angle, then 8 clicks will move the point of impact one minute of angle or approximately one inch at 100 yards and approximately 2 inches at 200 yards. Or, the scope could be calibrated in mils, so if one click moves the point of impact 1/8 mil, that would be .45" at 100 yards. You said MOA in your post, so let's go with that.

My suggestion would be to confirm the 100 yard zero of the crosshairs, then shoot at a target at 200 yards, still using the crosshairs for a point of aim. Then use the mil dots in the scope to determine the distance from your point of aim and the group shot at 200 yards. Then, to adjust your scope so the point of aim and point of impact are the same at 200 yards. move the turret how ever many clicks are needed for the measured distance, keeping in mind that at 200 yards, 1/8 MOA will be approximately 1/4 inch. A 6 inch difference at 200 yards would mean 24 clicks up, 7 inches 28 clicks up, etc.

The calibration on scopes in not always exact so hopefully this gets you in the ballpark.
 
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