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We do a lot of long range shooting with .22s. Since this is for target, do not use high velocity ammo. There are volumes of information out there about subsonic ammo being a lot more accurate in the .22.

I do not use a Mil Dot, so I can't help you there. We play a lot of games from 100-200 yards with our 22s. There are some scope mounting tricks you can play to get enough MOA elevation too.

PM and I can send you some links to some other forums that specialize in rimfire shooting (don't want to violate any rules here).

Have fun.
 

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Really?

I will be that guy. The one that jumps on a 4 year old thread. I just had to say I am surprised by the pessimism I shoot 22 out to 300 regularly and it is super fun and well within the capability of a 22lr. And my personal experience is high velocity works quite well. Sure it may be less accurate at short distances. But it has more energy so is less affected by wind and drop.
 

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I will be that guy. The one that jumps on a 4 year old thread. I just had to say I am surprised by the pessimism I shoot 22 out to 300 regularly and it is super fun and well within the capability of a 22lr. And my personal experience is high velocity works quite well. Sure it may be less accurate at short distances. But it has more energy so is less affected by wind and drop.
Welcome to the shooters forum.

You are going to be an asset here. Anyone who routinely shoots a .22lr at 300 yds. with accuracy is someone I could learn from. REALLY!
 

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My Rifle & Pistol club has had a couple matches over the years for .22LR @ 200 years, though unfortunately I have never attended any. My understanding is that .22LR @ 200 is a close approximation of .308 @ 1000 yards in terms of drop and wind drift. I'm actually quite tempted to mount a mil-dot scope on one of my 10/22's and give it a try.
 

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There's a group of guys at my club that shoot the smallbore ram silhouettes off the bench at 200yards, don't expect good results with cheap ammunition, here's what they use.
High velocity ammunition is less accurate at any ranges as compared to standard velocity, when the bullet transitions from supersonic to subsonic it becomes unstable for a microsecond and deviates from it's original path.
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1...nition-22-long-rifle-40-grain-lead-round-nose
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Historically speaking, the .22 L.R. cartridge was developed to answer the call from shooters in the late 1800's asking for a better cartridge than the .22 Long for 200 yard shooting which was the distance that some competitions were fired at back in that time.

A couple of years ago I shot some .22 L.R. handloaded with black powder (as the original cartridges were loaded) at 200....sort of stepping back in time so to speak.

The wind was coming in from 9 o'clock and varied a bit in speed. Thus the bit of horizontal dispersion.

Fun! Fun! Fun! :):):)



John
 

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Next Spring/Summer, I am planning on some 200 yard range work with the 22, as well as F class centerfire. The problem is finding long range events around here. Most silouete shoots are 100 yard and on the rare occassion that you do find a 200 yard or f class event within a couple of hours drive, the turn out is pretty low.

I think the 100 yard shoots are more common because of rangle limitations and perhaps they bring more shooters in. We usually get 20-30 shooters, with an event in the area once every couple months. A lot of the same guys with the occasional new guy whom everyone bends over backwards to help and encourage.

While I dont consider myself to be an authority on the matter, as I have yet to make that elite group of those who have shot a perfect score (my highest being a 19), I shoot Norma, RWS, Ely, or Wolf for events, typically match grade. Always the same brand out of the same case until the case is gone. Neither myself or anyone I know shoots high velocity even at 100 yards. The deviation mentioned by KevinBear above, and in-turn the group size, grows exponentially with distance. High velocity is fairly accurate at 50 yards, but not longer distances, the opposite of what someone stated earlier.

There are youtube vids showing guys shooting 22 lr out to 400 yards and succesfully hitting a sheet of plywood "some" of the time. I think that is propably pretty realistic.

And BTW, Nice Shootin John!
 

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It used to be done all the time

No wind, if it stood quite still we regularly used to kill guineafowl with the .22 LR and open sights at 200 yards over the hood of a truck when I was a school boy. They stretched up to check you out and that was the time to shoot it. You just slipped two stages up on the rear sight and there you were.

Helmeted_Guineafowl_in_the_Drakensberg_of_Natal.jpg

HemetedGuineafowl.jpg

HemetedGuineafowlcooked.jpg
 

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As said before, standard velocity is more acccurate. CCI SV and even Blazers are amazing for practice. That Savage bolt action will amaze you. I have 2 that I had 2 side by side 10 shot groups in 1" at a hundred yards. The local club shoots raw eggs at 300 hanging in front of steel. Often under 5 shots to hit it. A 10-22 will shoot with the savage if you put about $800 in it. Also, a 20 degre base may be needed. Enjoy.
 

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Sako quad

The best sporter on the market right now for the money is the Sako Quad, it's not an inexpensive gun but the accuracy is on par with the top 22 sporters and most of the production target rifles made in the world. The trigger is excellent and if at some point you want a Lilja barrel or want to change calibers just buy another Sako barrel, it took longer to type this than it does to change one.
A couple of friends have them as well as myself, none of them are finicky about ammunition, doesn't matter if it's Eley, RWS or Lapua they group under an inch at 100m consistently with some groups half that.

http://www.gunbroker.com/item/604592263
 

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No wind, if it stood quite still we regularly used to kill guineafowl with the .22 LR and open sights at 200 yards over the hood of a truck when I was a school boy. They stretched up to check you out and that was the time to shoot it. You just slipped two stages up on the rear sight and there you were.

View attachment 45017

View attachment 45025

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If that tastes as good as it looks, my half mile away neighbor's guineas are in trouble! All this time I thought they were just noisemakers!
 

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If that tastes as good as it looks, my half mile away neighbor's guineas are in trouble! All this time I thought they were just noisemakers!
They don't have alot of meat on them, I made schnitzel out of 3 of them a couple of years ago for Christmas dinner and was not impressed but that was just one try, not many recipes for them in American cookbooks. On the positive side there's three less of them squawking constantly.
 

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I know this is an old thread, but I thought that I'd reply anyway.

When I was a kid too small to hold up a 22 rifle, my Dad would hold the barrel in his palm and I would line up the sights and shoot. That is how I learned to shoot before I was 5 years old.

Dad and I shot a LOT together. Daddy long legs at 30 yards sunning themselves on an old sheet of plywood. Points were only given if all that was left was legs. The long-distance shooting was at first at old paint cans and later at Ritz crackers once I learned to estimate bullet drop at over 100 yards. All of this is before the appearance of super high-velocity ammo. The best we had was 1200 fps.

Years later I taught my daughter how to shoot a 1911, and later how to shoot it at long distance. You CAN reliably make a fist sized pattern on a target with a 1911, once you know how much to compensate for bullet drop. I swear that the holes in the target backing were at 30 degrees from horizontal, sort of like a miniature artillery round or mortar hitting the target. I would not have wanted to be hit by a 230 grain 45 bullet even at that distance.

Only half the problem with long-distance shooting is accuracy. The other problem is making sure the bullet has enough energy for a clean kill at that distance.
 

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There are matches now for long range .22 . A local club shoots to 300 on 12 in plates. Wind reading and good ammo are key, as is a repeatable scope. Most premium ammo does well to 150 or so , longer than that and the Lapua center x seems to dominate. Wind is not your friend at extended range with a 22, neither is mirage.
 

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A double zombie thread form 2012 and 2016. Obviously, there is still interest. I shoot out to 200 yards on a regular basis and out to 250 occasionally. In fact, I seem to have 2 distances for .22 LR in a rifle, 50 yards for prone and 3P practice and 200 yards on still plates.

In my experience standard velocity ammo is far more accurate at long range, and you'll get less wind drift.

With SK Std Plus using a 40 grain bullet with a G1 BC of .132 and a muzzle velocity of 1066 fps, with a 10 mph full value crosswind you'll have 7.4 MOA / 15.4 MOA of drift at 200 yards on a standard day (sea level, 70 degrees F and 30% humidity).

In comparison with a 40 gr Remington Thunderbolt with a G1 BC of .139 and a muzzle velocity of 1255 fps, you will get 8.8 MOA / 18.5" of drift in the same 10 mph full value crosswind.

CCI standard velocity has a lower BC of .120 and a muzzle velocity of 1070 fps, but it still beats the high velocity ammo with a drift of 8.1 MOA / 16.9".


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Velocity wise, high velocity doesn't get you quite as much as you might think.

At 200 yards, the Std Plus load above on the same standard day, with a 100 yard zero and a 2.7" sight height, has a nominal drop of 18.1 MOA / 37.9" and the remaining velocity is 827 fps.

For the Remington Thunderbolt the drop is 14.4MOA / 30.1" and the remaining velocity is 903 fps.

For the CCi standard velocity, the drop is 18.5 MOA / 38.7", and the remaining velocity is 812 fps.

The high velocity bullets shed velocity quickly with the Thunderbolt load above going subsonic at just 45 yards, and once subsonic drag falls off sharply. If you compare the numbers at 200 yards for the Sk and Remington you see 30" versus 38". If you look past 200 yards for the Remington you'll see 38" of drop at 215 yards. To be fair the mid range trajectory will also be flatter at 2.2" at 60 yards compared to 3.2". But that reduction of 1" at mid range and 15 more yards at long rang is the only benefit you really get.

However, since the bullet is much less stable in the transonic speed range, accuracy past 45 yards is generally much worse and that's the cost you pay for that 1 less inch of rise at 60 yards and 15 more yards of range at 200 yards.

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The high velocity loads have an edge in elevation but the standard velocity loads have a clear edge in wind drift. Given that the trajectories are all very curved, you are better served by controlling for the large drop with the standard velocity loads, while taking advantage of their reduced wind drift. It's a lot easier to accurately estimate range than wind, and its nice to have more margin for error with the wind.

Standard velocity loads are also much more accurate at long range. a mid range match ammo like Sk Std Plus in an accurate .22 LR that likes it will produce 5 shot groups averaging 1 MOA at 100 yards. High velocity ammo just won't.

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Temperature also has a large impact on .22 LR trajectory. Part of it is the effect of temperature on the speed of sound, part of it is the effect of temperature on the internal ballistics and resulting muzzle velocity, but most of it is the effect of increased or decreased air density.

Using the SK load above with a 100 yard zero at 200 yards you get:

10 degrees F = 20.2 MOA drop, 9.5 MOA windage, 781 fps remaining velocity.
40 degrees F = 19.1 MOA drop, 8.6 MOA windage, 805 fps remaining velocity.
70 degrees F = 18.1 MOA drop, 7.4 MOA windage, 827 fps remaining velocity.
100 degrees F = 17.3 MOA drop, 6.5 MOA windage, 847 fps remaining velocity.

That means that if you zero your long range .22 at 100 yards on a hot august afternoon, you'll potentially find yourself shooting 2.2 MOA lower at 200 yards a few months later on a 40 degree day than you were on that hot summer day. That's a 4.6" increase in drop at 200 yards just due to the change in external ballistics due to the lower temperature. (That is assuming your muzzle velocity is the same at the colder temperature.) If you are shooting at a 6" steel plate, that'll be a clean miss and you'll be tempted to blame the gun or the scope for losing zero.

As a general rule I'll add a 1 MOA of elevation for every 30 degrees of decrease in temperature, and I'll remove 1 MOA of elevation for every 30 degrees of increase in temperature over what I had on the day I zeroed the rifle. I make the same 1 MOA per 30 degree correction for windage, based on a 10 mph full value crosswind.

That will normally get the first round on the plate at 200 yards.

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Accuracy with .22LR isn't as linear as it is with a high velocity center fire round. A large part of that is the heel based bullet used in .22 LR. It's impossible to make the bases as consistent as you can with a jacketed flat based or boat tailed centerfire bullet. The end result is that even on a dead calm day, your 1 MOA at 100 yards load and rifle combination will probably be shooting between 1.5 MOA and 2 MOA at 200 yards. Adding even a little variable wind can make staying on a 4" plate or even a 6" plate at 200 yards a challenge.
 

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Bullet performance on live game is the only real benefit for high velocity 22 ammunition.

I've heard that the current runs of CCI standard velocity is excellent mid-range priced ammunition, comparable to SK standard.
 

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Anything past 50 yds is considered "long range" for my .22lr's! :)


Presently limited to one .22lr (grandson has the others) which is a Made in Oregon Kimber Mod 82C with fluted ss bbl and wearing a Burris 6x18 Signature scope. Only likes the Lapua Midas "M" standard velocity ammo. Gags if I put something else in it. Being a high class rimfire rifle, it only likes high class ammo.
 
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Anything past 50 yds is considered "long range" for my .22lr's! :)


Presently limited to one .22lr (grandson has the others) which is a Made in Oregon Kimber Mod 82C with fluted ss bbl and wearing a Burris 6x18 Signature scope. Only likes the Lapua Midas "M" standard velocity ammo. Gags if I put something else in it. Being a high class rimfire rifle, it only likes high class ammo.
That's a really common trait of Kimbers, my wife had a HS and I had a high grade Yonkers sporter, they liked black and red box Eley the best, granted they were sub moa guns with that ammunition. Everything else was not what you would expect from a moderately high end gun.
 
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