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Discussion Starter #1
If you were going to rebarrel a short-action Rem 700 to one of these calibers, which would it be, and why? No cheating, you have to stick to these two calibers to play!
   Have fun and let's hear your ideas...   IDShooter
 

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It would depend somewhat on your intended usage. I've owned a couple 257R and it is an absolutely great caliber. IMHO the Roberts is far superior to the 6's as the great dual purpose "light" caliber.

However, the short action limits your capabilitites somewhat with the 117-120 gr. bullets. So if dual purpose is you goal, the .260 is probably even better than the Roberts. However if you are thinkin' of a walking varminter, with the 85 gr. bullets. Or, if you would be  happy with the 100 gr. bullets for deer then the Roberts would be fine.

I've loved the Roberts for 20 years, but if I were to build another rifle in that category, it would be the .260
 

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To clarify:

I realize that it sounded like I don't care for the 100 gr. 257 as a deer round. I've shot about a truckload of deer with my 257's using both the 117-120 and the 100's. If anything, I feel that the 100 may kill better/quicker than the heavier bullets. The 100 gr. Nosler partition has been especially good.

I mentioned the caution in the previous post because a lot of guys seem to think that a 100 gr. bullet is too light for deer whether it's a .243, .257, or .264. I suspect that the 120 range was built with the 25-06 in mind. They do seem to expand much slower than the 100's @ .257 velocities.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Well, let's see.

You live in Idaho.

There are very large critters up there.

I think I would go for the one that throws the biggest bullets!

Frankly.....  a .358 Win is starting to sound good, when you think about elk and bears and such in the woods.

OK it has to be one of those two, I'd say the .260 hands down, 125-140gr. bullets at reasonable velocities beat the Roberts for your neck of the woods.

Like Jim I have a Roberts and like it a lot but it's a little different hunting for me.  Our whitetails are about the size of a decent Labrador retriever.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Good answers so far guys. I too have a .257 Roberts but I don't really care for the vehicle (Ruger77MKII) so I'm tempted to have the rebarrel job done in .257 also, since I already have dies and a pile of brass.
    BUT, Mike hit the nail on the head. We have pretty big critters up here. Heck, the forkhorn buck I shot last season weighed almost 170 lbs field dressed, so these are not little deer. That doesn't even get into the elk & bears!
     I purposefully left out my intended usage just so people would give me their own reasons for their choices. But, basically I'm looking for a light recoiling, fairly flat shooting deer rifle that is elk-capable in a pinch since in some areas the season overlaps. The flat shooting stipulation is because we sometimes hunt pronghorn too.
      That last use is what rules out the .358. Otherwise it would be a top pick for the kind of deer and elk country I live in. Right now the rifle is a .308 and works fine for all the intended uses I've named. I've just got the urge for something different, and lighter recoil appeals. I'm getting arthritis in my neck and shoulders so I'm thinking lower recoil will help.             IDShooter
 

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IMHO: The 257 is probably one of the most underrated cartridges around. It suffers from factory loads of slow round nose projectiles. When loaded to it's potential in a MODERN bolt gun ('98 mauser or stronger) it really shines. With that said, the 260 Rem from what I see/hear is a remake of the old & still highly useful 6.5x55 Swede.
So-- my suggestionis- if you want to keep costs down go with the 257 since you already have dies, etc. If you "need" a new one go with the 260. I doubt that any thing you shoot with either one will know the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey guys,
    I was hoping more people would weigh in, but I guess most of the guys here are big bore fans :)  .
       Charlie, "something new" is definitely part of the intrigue of the .260. I have shot, owned, or reloaded for 22, 24, 25, 27, 28, 30, 32, 33, 35 and 44 caliber rifles. I'm not interested in a 17 or 20, so 26 is the only one left below 30 caliber that I haven't worked with.  I've shot enough game with different calibers to know it really doesn't make much difference, but it's a hobby, you know?
     Please, if anybody else has input jump right in!   IDShooter
 

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Hi again ID.

I thought you'd get a flood with this thread as well. Maybe not as many fans of the good 'ol Roberts as we thought.

I'm thinking about a .260 as well. Even though I have a 25-06, 7mm-08, and a 338-08, the .260 intrigues me. I suppose that maybe if I could build a real tack drivin' (ultra-light) .260, it would do the things that I do with both the 25 and the little 7, i.e. walking varminter/long range deer (25) backpack for deer (7mm).

IMHO the clincher for you is is the phrase "Elk Capable in a pinch" Certainly the 140s or even the 160s in 6.5 can do that job far better than the Roberts. That really sort of ends that particular debate.

Good luck, I betcha you'll love the .260
 

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ID,

Actually, I have only experience with the .257, which I dearly love for deer and antelope.  I would not be afraid to use a good, heavy bullet to shoot an elk under ideal conditions with it, as I have seen the 120 Nosler partitions penetrate about 3 feet in deer and have only recovered one bullet.  It will definitely "kill" elk.

That said, however, I consider it light for elk, just as I consider the 260.  I know of several elk killed with .264 caliber bullets, mostly 140's in several different cartridges, ranging from 6.5 Swede to .264 Winchester.  I also know of two that were probably hit and lost.  Bullet placement, I would guess, but they were not recovered, to my knowledge, so no real proof.

I am not the one not to try something new, so, if that be the criteria, go with the .260 and enjoy the journey.  If you are looking for an established cartridge, go with the .257.  The difference is not large enough to argue over.  

Now the .450 Alaskan vs the .50 Alaskan........

dclark
 

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Given its ballistic similarity to the 6.5X55 Swedish in the hot Norma loading (which I am a huge fan of) my vote would be for the 260 Rem. The Swede's performance on Scandinavian moose is, by most accounts, very, very good.
 

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The one to ask would be my little sister. She's taken deer and antelope every year since her early teens with one. For elk, she uses a .338-'06. I don't know, but I think there's also a larger choice of bullets for the .257 as opposed to the .264. You couldn't get the Roberts away from her with a crowbar anyway. I'm considering one in an Encore myself. RKBA!
 
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