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Can anyone give me some information on this cartridge? What standard cartridge was it developed from?
Any info on reloading?
 

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Clark Wildcat

chuckls said:
Can anyone give me some information on this cartridge? What standard cartridge was it developed from?
Any info on reloading?
The only wildcat with the Clark name that I am aware of is the "224 Clark". When and where did you become aware of a 264 Clark?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
264 Clark (Clarke?)

NITRO said:
The only wildcat with the Clark name that I am aware of is the "224 Clark". When and where did you become aware of a 264 Clark?
I came across the gun at a show in California. The fellow that had it got it from an estate nearby and had no ammunition, dies, etc. to go with it. Looked to me like an interesting project if I could get a little insight about it.
 

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I May Have The Information You Need

chuckls said:
I came across the gun at a show in California. The fellow that had it got it from an estate nearby and had no ammunition, dies, etc. to go with it. Looked to me like an interesting project if I could get a little insight about it.

I BOUGHT A .224 CLARK FROM A DEALER IN CALIFORNIA THAT SOUNDS A LOT LIKE THE GUN YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT.
TO START OUT YOU HAVE TO FIRE FORM A .257 ROBERTS TO MAKE IT FIT YOUR CHAMBER CORRECTLY YOU CN USE A 6MM.BR. BUT I HAVE A LETTER WRITTEN BY CLARK AND HE LIKES THE .257 BETTER BECAUSE THE CASING IS THICKER.
HERE IS SOME OF THE FIGURES I HAVE FROM MY CHRONO.
THIS IS USING A 80 GRAIN BULLET WITH IMR 4831 POWDER WITH FED. 216 PRIMERS.
45 GR.=3064 FPS 46 GR.=3112 47 GR.=3204 48 GR.=3265
49 GR.=3340 50 GR.=3494 51 GR. =3633 52 GR.=3781 53 GR.=3970 54 GR.=4090 55 GR=4210
i DO NOT ADVISE USING OVER 50 GR. AS YO START HAVING PROBLEMS FLATTENING PRIMERS AND SUCH i AM STILL EXPERIMENTING WITH OTHER POWDERS AND PRIMERS BUT LAST YEAR i KILLED A COYOTE AT 640 YDS OFF A BENCH AND BAGS IN OK.
I HOPE THIS HELPS SOME.
 

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.264 Clark

chuckls said:
I came across the gun at a show in California. The fellow that had it got it from an estate nearby and had no ammunition, dies, etc. to go with it. Looked to me like an interesting project if I could get a little insight about it.

Regarding the .264Clark rifle - Did you end up buying it? I looked at the same rifle (most probably) at the Vallejo gun show a while back.

Just curious if you ended up with it - I almost bought it myself, and was wondering where it finally went to...

Regards,

John D.
 

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I just purchased a rifle that is marked .264 Clark, I dont know if this is the same rifle that has been floating around Northern CA. It is built on a Remington 1917 action and being a fan of the obsolete and unusual I couldnt resist. Unfortunately the only mention i could find of .264 Clark was on this Forum. I just picked it up Sat and have not had a chance to do a chamber cast yet but i will post what i find. If anyone has any other information on this cartridge or on Clark himself i would love to find out more. I will post what I find if anyone has interest.
Jayson
 

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The maker might be Kinnith or Kenneth Clark, I've seen it spelled both ways. out of Madera, CA.. This goes back to the late 40's early 50's.
 

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Jayson,

I'm about to purchase a similar rifle in 264 Clark here in Maine. Have you been able to find anything about the cartridge and/or it's loading. Thanks for any info.

Toby
 

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The 264 Clark is a shortened and improved cartridge based on the standard magnum case. The easy est way to make it is to full length size a 264 Winchester in the Clark die and trim to length, then fire forme to blow out case taper. We used 7 mm Remington case to make them but it must be annealed first
I think George Knont's book on cartridge conversions has the information you are looking fore.

Exblaster
 

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To be expected...

You will not like the price.


Exblaster
Well, when we deign to go off the beaten path, we can expect to pay a price for it. Years and years ago, I coined a phrase that has come back to bite me over and over again: "There is a price in life for everything you do. Sooner or later, you will pay it." I've been paying the price ever since I turned down the Navy, who wanted to put me through school and then onto nuclear submarines as a LT-JG. I'd be an O-6 by now, or maybe even retired. I declined to join on November 2, 1976-- the day Carter was elected. Biggest mistake I ever made in my whole life. But you can't go back...

Per wildcatting and costs thereof, we expect to pay through the nose for ammo that we can't just go down to the sportin' goods store and buy right off the shelf. But therein is the allure. It's the uniqueness of what we've created that drives us. And we get to experiment over ground that relatively very few shooters have ever tread.

I'll spend roughly $2,500 on my project before the first bullet is launched. The idea for my round emerged from the mist in my mind in July of 2008. Various stumbling blocks kept any real progress from obtaining until January 2011. I lost ten months to a super-premium, cut-rifled barrelmaker who said he could do the job but never sent Chip One flying. I canceled that order on March 19. My new Hart barrel should be in my gunsmith's hands in about two weeks. I hope to see the rifle by middle to later July: Four years from vague idea to flyin' lead.

So don't blanch at the price for a single set of oddball reloading dies. Look at it as an investment in something that interests you. Try to optimize your numbers. Fine-tune your best load such that you can predict the velocity and point-of-impact down to splittin' a red hair. Then take that gun to a shoot-- and take home a prize...
 

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Well, when we deign to go off the beaten path, we can expect to pay a price for it. Years and years ago, I coined a phrase that has come back to bite me over and over again: "There is a price in life for everything you do. Sooner or later, you will pay it." I've been paying the price ever since I turned down the Navy, who wanted to put me through school and then onto nuclear submarines as a LT-JG. I'd be an O-6 by now, or maybe even retired. I declined to join on November 2, 1976-- the day Carter was elected. Biggest mistake I ever made in my whole life. But you can't go back...

Per wildcatting and costs thereof, we expect to pay through the nose for ammo that we can't just go down to the sportin' goods store and buy right off the shelf. But therein is the allure. It's the uniqueness of what we've created that drives us. And we get to experiment over ground that relatively very few shooters have ever tread.

I'll spend roughly $2,500 on my project before the first bullet is launched. The idea for my round emerged from the mist in my mind in July of 2008. Various stumbling blocks kept any real progress from obtaining until January 2011. I lost ten months to a super-premium, cut-rifled barrelmaker who said he could do the job but never sent Chip One flying. I canceled that order on March 19. My new Hart barrel should be in my gunsmith's hands in about two weeks. I hope to see the rifle by middle to later July: Four years from vague idea to flyin' lead.

So don't blanch at the price for a single set of oddball reloading dies. Look at it as an investment in something that interests you. Try to optimize your numbers. Fine-tune your best load such that you can predict the velocity and point-of-impact down to splittin' a red hair. Then take that gun to a shoot-- and take home a prize...
I have a dream also so how do you find a gunsmith willing to take a challenge to help build a new wildcat cartridge that will put a 6.5 140gr bullet over 4000 fps?
 

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Gunsmith with guts...

I'd email my gunsmith, one Bradly Hunt at Alkali International Corporation. He's in Winnemucca, NV. Just do a websearch for AIC; you'll find him. He builds custom rifles that cost upwards of five thousand dollars. I took my semi-functioning MRC M1999 rifle to him with my mildcat idea, the reloading dies, a bunch of empty cases, a bunch of bullets and the info that the barrel would be along in 8-10 weeks. We talked it all out and he will do what we came to agree should be done. I have no idea what I'm paying him but then, I don't care. I want my rifle to feeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeed, which it would not do as a 300WSM in a long-action receiver. So the mildcat was designed, the ducks ordered to line up, money spent, time taken and soon, I'll have a rifle that loads 'em just like a factory .30-06 from Remchester or Winmington. It has become a cause for me to do this. The cost is unimportant. I am single with no dependents and no debts. Life is good...
 

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. . . put a 6.5mm, 140-grain bullet over 4000 fps?
There are several guys who do these kind of wild and crazy things on another gun-related site at which I am a member. PM me if you want the name of the site. Good manners dictates that I not mention it here...
 

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I know its a long way to go but a necked down 338 Lapua Mag or a 375 RUM either with a 28 inch barrel should be able to get you to 4000fps with a 140gr. The RUM has a 30 degree shoulder and a hair longer with a little less body taper than the Lapua. That thing would shoot like a laser and be a blast.
 
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