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Discussion Starter #1
I inherited a 270-08 rifle, dies. Is brass available? I have no idea of how to re-form 308.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Run it into your .270-08 sizing die ;)

I'd take the expander ball out the first time you do this, and use a decent case lube. Imperial is great. I don't think that .308 to .277 will make the necks too thick, but keep an eye on it.

New brass will be easiest, but I've made .270 Win from once-fired .30-06 brass, no trouble.

Check the case length when done, it will likely 'grow' a little.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Where do I find dimensions for 270-08? Never re-formed brass before and would assume case length and neck diameter are rather important.
 

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the Multi National Force between Eqypt and Isreal,
Not too many people know about that one, did you serve there? I was there (mainly North Camp) late 2015 through early 2017 (about 18 months total).
 

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Chamber cast is the easiest and safest way to get dimensions for your rifle.
I find it fun to do , lots of people don’t seem to like it .
The only way I have tried it is using J belks method and I like that but there are heaps of ways .
A quick google search will show options.
Once you have a good cast to measure the voodoo of case resizing goes pretty quick.
I am an imperial wax fan as well.

be fun if you start a thread about your journey .

cheers .
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Probably safest to trim to .308 length. It's a wildcat, so there's no telling. But if they form from .308 brass......
 

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The Judge--
You have a very simple wildcat to make cases for. The easiest way is to start with 7-08 brass or .260 Remington brass. Both will make 270-08 by simply adjusting the FL die all the way down to the shell holder when the ram is all the way up. Smear a little Imperial sizing wax on the outside of the case and neck AND a little inside the neck. Run either case in the die. The .260 will hang up as the expander plug goes through the neck. A 7-08 will be slightly harder to re-slze, but it'll come out of the die a .270.
After resize the FIRST case, try it in the rifle. It should close with possibly a little snugness at the end of the bolt turn down but nothing you have to lean on.
Don't worry about crimping the bullet. Simply back off the seating die a full turn to take that out of play.

IT would be BEST to use 7-08 or .308 cases to make your wildcat. That way if somebody finds a round of it and tries to shoot it, it wont' hurt their rifle. If somebody managed to stuff your .270 into their .260, things wouldn't be so safe.
.308 Brass will be easiest to find. The process is exactly the same but re-size each case twice....simply run it all the way in the die twice. If it's hard chambering, look at the space between the shell holder and the bottom of the die WHEN A CASE IS being re-sized. That few thousandths is the 'spring' in the press and can be taken out by over-tightening the die. Don't do it unless the cases are hard to chamber.
 
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JBelk, if I may,.... please explain your chamber casting method and materials, referred to above?

I have been thinking of getting into it lately and would like to know a few different methods before I try.

Or, please send me a PM,... thanks!
 

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Casting is a way to measure internal dimensions very closely. IF it's for a permanent record, a metal cast from a proprietary casting alloy should be made. "CerroSafe" is a low temp metal made for that purpose.

A gunsmith's interest is to inspect his work right then. Cerrosafe can be frosted or wrinkled and defects in chamber is hard to see.....and expensive.

Common garden fertilizer grade SULFUR will cast just fine but the lifespan is only a week or two. It oxidizes quickly.

Sulfur melt at about 270F and catches on fire shortly afterwards. Do this OUT side unless you live with a forgiving dog or goldfish. Burning sulfur stinks so don't set it on fire! ;)

Swab the chamber or die or whatever smooth interior you want to cast with any light oil just enough to dampen the surface.
Plug the end of chamber with a cleaning patch about a quarter inch past the chamber.
Make a funnel to reach the rear of the chamber and plan ahead some. The barrel has to be held vertically and molten, hot sulfur has to be poured right in the center of the chamber. Gravity will mess up the job if given a chance so drape a cloth around what you don't want splashed with sulfur. (you should see my bench vise)
I make disposable funnels from pop cans.

When you get a couple ounces of sulfur melted, it'll be water thin (and hot). Pour in right in the chamber and stand by to pour MORE to fill the hollow center than forms as it cools. Just keep pouring in a dab to keep it leveled up.

Wait five minutes then stand a cleaning rod up on the floor and lower the barrel over it. The cast will slide out with a bump. UNLESS you poured in too much and it ran over into the locking lug recesses. Then you have a real mess to clean up. Use wooden sticks to scrape it off and dig it out.

Obviously, casting a reloading die is great practice and not nearly as risky. Casting a rifle that's totally together, is not suggested. Most chamber cast are poured just before a newly machined barrel is installed.

Some guns are easier than others-- Casting a M94 or Ruger #1 is pretty simple. A Mauser is tough. I had a customer with a Sav. M99 with the rotary magazine recess mostly full of sulfur. THAT was a bad job to repair. Cerrosafe melts in boiling water and is much easier to fix the inevitable overfills.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
JBelk - I have buckets of 308 from when I shot Service Rifle in competition. All LC military brass. Wouldn't 7-08 be a bit closer in size so I don't have to worry so much about outside neck diameter? Also, I'm concerned about C.O.L. I'm so new to this, I don't even know if I'm asking the right questions. Your last comment to me was very helpful. Thanks.
 

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THAT is where a chamber cast would be most valuable. Measure the necks. Its' been a well-known secret for decades that most .243s shoot better with .308 brass than with .243. While that is true, it's also true more .243s have shed their parts than any other caliber and almost more than all others combined.
Re-size a few and seat bullets in the cases. Measure in all directions across the neck of the cartridge and the chamber cast. The chamber HAS to be .0015 larger than the cartridge and SHOULD be .002 to .004 larger than the cartridge case neck. Always be aware when using necked down brass that a hard bolt close could let the magic smoke out. Be careful.
I wouldn't worry about length. The case length should be the same as .308 and as long as its not longER than .010 over nominal, it wont hurt anything. COL Cartridge overall will be the same for .308, 7-08, .260 and .243. They all just barely fit in the magazine, and thats a good starting place.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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JBelk - I have buckets of 308 from when I shot Service Rifle in competition. All LC military brass. Wouldn't 7-08 be a bit closer in size so I don't have to worry so much about outside neck diameter? Also, I'm concerned about C.O.L. I'm so new to this, I don't even know if I'm asking the right questions. Your last comment to me was very helpful. Thanks.
It's best practice to neck down so that if someone sees the "308 WIN" headstamp and tries to shoot it in a 308, no one gets hurt, BUT it's far easier to neck up when building brass. For instance, I can take almost any 270 brass, lube it really REALLY well and make 35 Whelen brass in one pass. Try necking down 35 Whelen to 270 and you are in for a real mutt of a time, plus wrinkles in the shoulder, mashed and ruined brass, new cuss words.

A recent attempt at making 25-06 brass from once fired 30-06 brass slathered in Imperial sizing wax IN THREE STEPS was enough that I broke down and bought several hundred rounds of factory 25-06 brass soon after. Necking up .243 to .270 would be an easy stretch if I can neck up .223 brass to .358 on a bet.



Yes, that is a 250 grain Hornady Interlock stuffed in a virgin piece of .223 brass.

Yes you are limited to magazine length, but that doesn't mean you can't get creative. I'd stick with a given length as determined by finding the lands by using a "split case and bullet"** and backing off say, oh, .040" , work up your load by only changing the amount of your chosen powder and ONLY changing seating depth as a last resort.

To "prove" my point with a f'rinstance: I have four .223's, two 788's, a 700 and a Sako 85. All have the same COAL as determined by the shortest chamber. Only powder amounts are changed to make them all shoot under 1/2 moa or less.


Ok, split case and bullet length gauge has been around for ever. Take a piece of brass that's been sized and using a wee saw, split the neck like so:



22-250, 308 and 35 Whelen if you're interested. ANyways, stuff the chosen bullet in a ways, but not too far so that when chamber the round the bullet won't be pushed back be the riflings, and WALLLAH, now you have your chamber length and using your Wilson comparitor nut you can move you chosen bullet back .040" when seating it in a "real" case over a sensible load of the chosen powder for fire forming. If one uses a lower end powder charge for the first firing you don't need to worry about "head space", which after the first firing is a non issue as long as you don't bump the shoulder back when resizing.

Anyways, that's how I'd do it if I were building loads for a 270-08 and that's how I did it when building the first loads for the 358 BONDED ©.

RJ
 
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