Shooters Forum banner
1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to the forum and am very excited to take part in these valuable discussions. Two weeks ago, I ordered a Savage Model 114 American Classic in .270 win. As I hunt mostly open plains, I have no need for a short barreled fast handling gun. For this reason, I chose a 26" heavy sporter barrel. I realize that it may be a little bit of overkill, but I could always cut it down to 24" right? This has been the longest two weeks of my life and I still have 2-4 more to go!
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
38,098 Posts
Welcome. I'll move this to the Rifles topic, doesn't really fit in with Rimfires :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
484 Posts
A long barrel turns a .270 into a magnum as far as I am concerned. I have a 24" on mine and have gotten 3200 fps with a 130 gr. bullet with published loads. You should do at least that well with your 26" barrel. You will have a great long range rifle with light recoil and low muzzle blast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,348 Posts
I am new to the forum and am very excited to take part in these valuable discussions. Two weeks ago, I ordered a Savage Model 114 American Classic in .270 win. As I hunt mostly open plains, I have no need for a short barreled fast handling gun. For this reason, I chose a 26" heavy sporter barrel. I realize that it may be a little bit of overkill, but I could always cut it down to 24" right? This has been the longest two weeks of my life and I still have 2-4 more to go!
Sounds like a plan. Barrel length aside, barrels are strangely individual in their properties. Most 26" bbrls will shoot faster than most 24" bbrls, etc. My 26" 7RM CDL is a tad slower than my old BDL with a 24" bbrl. The odds are on your side.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,777 Posts
Love the 'ol 270.
I put a new 25" stainless douglas barrel on a new 700 B&C and it not only made a good looking rifle, but a real tackdriver, also put a jewell trigger on it.
I've been playing around with the 140 grain bullets in 270 and those bullets give very good accuracy. Packs a pretty good wallop,too.
I shot a real nice muley buck this past fall with that combo.
Good luck with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
In anticipation, I have been picking up random boxes of shells to see what shoots best. To this point I have only got 130s, but ill take your advice and try out some 140s also. Dont reload as of yet so Im stuck with factories. What bullet is recommended in the 140s?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,777 Posts
The new 140 grain SST in the Hornady Superformance ammo gives 3100 fps. That's probably faster then what I reload. Ballistics for that one and my 280 Rem are nearly identical with 140's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,142 Posts
I'm not aware of any factory-loaded ammunition for it yet, but after 20+ years of handloading for, and hunting with, the 270Win, my favorite bullet is the 140gr Accubond, hands down. It shoots the same ragged hole groups I used to get from the 140gr Sierra GameKing bullets, but holds together well even at the high impact velocity you get with short-range shots. If you really dig into the ballistics of the three most common bullet weights for the 270, (130gr, 140gr and 150gr) you'll quickly realize that the best compromise of flat trajectory and retained energy is a 140gr boat-tailed model. Based on what I've seen so far, and what the "numbers" say (which I don't usually put a lot of faith into) the 140 Accubond is enough bullet for everything on this continent, except the big bears.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,452 Posts
Federal loads the 140 AB in their vital shok ammo line. My favorite deer bullet has been the 130 Sierra PH. I also like the 130 Hornady SP, both have given excellent accuracy. I have loaded the 140 AB and it's been a good performer too and a good compromise for sure. A good choice for an all around for everything you would shoot with a 270 bullet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,142 Posts
Federal loads the 140 AB in their vital shok ammo line. My favorite deer bullet has been the 130 Sierra PH. I also like the 130 Hornady SP, both have given excellent accuracy. I have loaded the 140 AB and it's been a good performer too and a good compromise for sure. A good choice for an all around for everything you would shoot with a 270 bullet.
Thanks for letting everyone know Federal is loading the 140gr Accubond in their vital shock line. I've been handloading for so long, I don't know what all is out there. :) I have settled on the 140gr bullets because they're not "too much" for deer and I wanted the extra weight/energy when I was hog hunting, out West. They did a good job, but I can't really say they were better than 130's...it's probably more of a personal choice, than anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
I think I would try the Hornady 130 Superperformance GMX. If that round groups well, buy and few boxes at the best price you can find and don't look back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Not sure about the assumptions

I am not sure that I agree with nearly everyone's assumptions that the longer barrel necessarily equates to higher velocity. In fact, you may be getting the same or even a bit less velocity than a 24 or 25 inch barrel.

Check out the article on 204ruger.com which is an actual test of a .204 Ruger barrel, starting out at 24 inches, and then removing an inch at a time. Between 24 and 21 or 22 inches, there is virtually no difference for this particular barrel and cartridge, and the highest average velocity was not attained with the 24 incher, if I recall correctly.

Further, although you did not suggest this, I have found that many people seem to assume that a longer barrel is also more accurate than a shorter barrel, but that has not been proven to be true. In fact, the opposite may be true in many cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,766 Posts
I am not sure that I agree with nearly everyone's assumptions that the longer barrel necessarily equates to higher velocity. In fact, you may be getting the same or even a bit less velocity than a 24 or 25 inch barrel.

Check out the article on 204ruger.com which is an actual test of a .204 Ruger barrel, starting out at 24 inches, and then removing an inch at a time. Between 24 and 21 or 22 inches, there is virtually no difference for this particular barrel and cartridge, and the highest average velocity was not attained with the 24 incher, if I recall correctly.

Further, although you did not suggest this, I have found that many people seem to assume that a longer barrel is also more accurate than a shorter barrel, but that has not been proven to be true. In fact, the opposite may be true in many cases.

In general and normaly a longer barrel wwill give more velocity and the higher the case capacity for a given bore diamenter the more likely the longer barrel is to give higher velocity

This rulewill have exception where a shorter barrel gives as much and sometimes more velocity than a longer tube. This is the exception rather thant the rule IMHO and experience.

In internal ballistics, there are no hard blanket rules that always apply
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,142 Posts
I am not sure that I agree with nearly everyone's assumptions that the longer barrel necessarily equates to higher velocity. In fact, you may be getting the same or even a bit less velocity than a 24 or 25 inch barrel.

Check out the article on 204ruger.com which is an actual test of a .204 Ruger barrel, starting out at 24 inches, and then removing an inch at a time. Between 24 and 21 or 22 inches, there is virtually no difference for this particular barrel and cartridge, and the highest average velocity was not attained with the 24 incher, if I recall correctly.

Further, although you did not suggest this, I have found that many people seem to assume that a longer barrel is also more accurate than a shorter barrel, but that has not been proven to be true. In fact, the opposite may be true in many cases.
The article to which you refer can be found here:

http://www.bullberry.com/204Rugerdata.html

First, let me state that a 5-shot group can hardly be considered a scientific test of velocity spread or average. Shame on Fred Smith for writing the article without taking the time to do it right and give us something meaningful to learn by his effort. Furthermore, tests should have been performed with AT LEAST 3 different bullets/weights and 3 or 4 powders under each, because as barrel length decreases, faster-burning powders generally produce better results. (The tremendous muzzle blast he references in the article could have been mitigated enough to allow continued testing, if the test had been that thorough.) I would also be curious to know how the muzzle was crowned after each reduction in length, because a sloppy job there could account for large discrepancies in velocity, all by itself.

The rule of thumb that longer barrels create higher velocity is true, until it reaches such a length that the friction of the barrel slowing the bullet down is greater than the ability of the pressure supplied by the powder burn to accelerate it. For over-bore cartridges, which the 204 certainly is, this rule is especially true. The conventional wisdom on certain cartridges, like the 7RM, 264WM, and quite a few other small to medium bore magnums, requiring a 26" barrel to achieve their best velocity, is not just a lie told to sell longer barrels.

In this particular case, the study on the 204 Ruger by Bulberry is too limited in scope and performed in too haphazard a way, rendering the "findings" irrelevant, in my mind. At the very least, longer barrels are always capable of generating higher velocity. It is also particularly note-worthy, to me, that the author admits to following predisposition for 20" barrels:

"For my test I'd be forced to say that 23" is the optimum length. Those of you who know me, realize that I was hoping to find highest velocity at 20". But my chronograph won't lie just because I'm a fan of shorter barrels."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
720 Posts
In my opinion, if 2 more inches of barrel give you 30 or 40 feet per second gain, to me that is a 30-40 feet per second gain. I know that no animal is going ever be able to tell whether the projectile is traveling at 3100 feet per second or 3130 or 3140. I am just a velocity nut. I want more, as long as the cost does not outway the gain.

I have a 22" barrel 270 Winchester, and it is a great shooter, but I am not quite achieveing published velocities in my reloading books. Why is that, because the published veloocities in my reloading books were are created and tested using 24" barrels. Yes i am missing published velocites by 40 or 50 feet per second, and yes I could up my loads a little to compensate, but I am afraid of losing the accuracy that I have. Since this rifle and this load have been working together for more than 20 years. So in this case I am willing to leave that 40 or 50 feet per second alone, and keep the load that makes this 270 as accurate as it is. The loss of the accuracy would outway the gain of 40 or 50 feet per second in my opinion. So I am going to leave it alone. Maybe one day when I have more time on my hands I will play around with it, and try something new.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,777 Posts
Whether a 22' or 24' barrel is more accurate has never been my reasoning for opting for a longer barrel. I simply hold point of aim better with the longer barrels. The balance is different for me, with more forward weight, but since I do most of my hunting out of an enclosed blind with a substantial rest, I can hold on target better. That may be in my head, but it gives me confidence if I can shoot the rifle better.
I have a 243 Win with a 25 1/2", 280 Rem with a 24", a 223 Rem with a 24" a new 257 Roberts with a 24", the 270 Win with a 25", and soon, a 260 Rem with a 25". The short action Remington allows me to go 25" without changing the balance of the rifle.
Also a couple of 6.5x55 with 22"
Anyway, as you can see, I like the longer barrels.
That's why they make Coke and Pepsi.
Good Luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
"Whether a 22' or 24' barrel is more accurate has never been my reasoning for opting for a longer barrel. I simply hold point of aim better with the longer barrels. The balance is different for me, with more forward weight, but since I do most of my hunting out of an enclosed blind with a substantial rest, I can hold on target better. That may be in my head, but it gives me confidence if I can shoot the rifle better."


This is my reasoning as well. Definately makes the rifle more stable on bipods. A more stable rifle is more accurate in my opinion. Most all of my shots hunting muleys have been between 250 and 400 yrds. the weight really helps in this situation.

I have a Savage 99 in .243 that I use in the creek bottoms. Its light and quick. Nearly always turns out to be my whitetail gun.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top