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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just recently bought a Browning BAR MK3 in 270 Winchester, and absolutely love the rifle. Accurate and the semi auto action seems to eat up a lot of recoil. I've tried 130gr and 140gr bullets so far and got great accuracy from both. For hog hunting I've picked up a few boxes of 130gr partitions though I'm curious as to whether I should have tried the 150gr Paritiom to ensure complete pass through or if I should expect pass throughs with the 130 partition. The reason for my debating this is that my shots will be very close 30-100 yards with 30-60 yards being most likely. Even though the partition is known to be a tough bullet should I expect the 130gr version to hold up or go with the 150 for pass throughs if I find it groups well in my rifle? I'm aware any 130-150gr bullet will do what I need, but I do want pass throughs for good blood trails since I'm hunting in thick woods.
 

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Since you are shooting a semi-auto and will need to crimp, I think my vote would go to a Hornady 140 gr Interlock or SST since they have a cannelure. I have had good results with both bullets in .308 and .30-06. Just as the 165 grain bullet is the best all around option for a .30-06, I think 140 grain pill is the best option for a .270 Win. Just my opinion, but for sure solid options.
 

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Hard to get better advice than BD just gave, but if I had to choose between 130gr and 150gr Partitions, for hog hunting, I'd go with the 150 grain bullet.
 

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Congratulations on a fine new rifle! I own several .270s at this time and usually decide on bullet weight by letting the rifle tell me. As a couple examples, one of my M70s loves 150gr, while the other loves 130gr. My M700Ti likes 140gr TBBC and a #1RSI liked 130gr "X".

I'd lean towards 150gr NPs, but 130s should work just fine. The fronts will open quickly, but the rear shank will more than likely continue on through, albeit at a lesser diameter. We dug out and inspected a 30 cal NP at the camp We visited last month.

We passed it around studying the "remnants". Only a very small portion of the front jacket remained and no lead was left. The rear shank was intact, completely and it was a worthwhile discussion about how NPs are designed to perform for those present who were not familiar.

Two other bullets I'd use for your needs would be the 140gr Accubond and 140gr TBBC. I got an up close look at the effects of a 140gr TBBC on a very large (~ 300 pounds)hog that had the Skinner of that hog asking what kind of bullet out of a .270 did that kind of damage. Shot distance was about 60 yards.

Good luck!
 

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I'd personally favor the 150grain Hornady Interlock. Pigs have a tough shield especially the larger ones and it's amazing what it can withstand. The 270 is an excellent rifle an combined with the interlocks for penetration, you'll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Really appreciate the feedback! I'm going to save the 130's for deer season and test the 140gr interlock and 150grain option to see which my rifle prefers and go with which ever groups better. Can't wait to get a hog with the 270. Also good point regarding crimp in the semi-auto. This is my first semi-auto and I was wondering if a crimp style bullet was the best choice to keep from getting bullet set back.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got tot the range today and boy was I happy. Winchester 150gr power points were very accurate at 100. These cheap low BC rounds were touching holes after I fouled the barrel. For hog hunting with shots being a max of 100 yard that s just can't be beat. Really impressed with the 270 accuracy across all bullet weights. I've never had a caliber/rifle that groups so well across all bullet weights and to top it off all bullet weights stayed closer to zero than any caliber I have had when switching weights. My particular rifle does favor the 140-150's, but shoot great with the 130's as well. Boy do I love the new BAR. Hopefully I'll have some pictures to share from my hunt I'm a few weeks.
 

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The last 270 I had was a Mark X bolt action, and it seemed to love the Remington Core-Lokt 150, which would be another good round for hogs if your rifle likes them. Usually available at most Wally Worlds that sell ammo.
 

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Got tot the range today and boy was I happy. Winchester 150gr power points were very accurate at 100. These cheap low BC rounds were touching holes after I fouled the barrel. For hog hunting with shots being a max of 100 yard that s just can't be beat. Really impressed with the 270 accuracy across all bullet weights. I've never had a caliber/rifle that groups so well across all bullet weights and to top it off all bullet weights stayed closer to zero than any caliber I have had when switching weights. My particular rifle does favor the 140-150's, but shoot great with the 130's as well. Boy do I love the new BAR. Hopefully I'll have some pictures to share from my hunt I'm a few weeks.
That's the exact load that shoots so well out of one of my M70s in .270. It's a pre '64 made in the custom shop and it loves it some Winchester PP 150gr. :D
 

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Heavier and slower works better on pigs, in my experience.
 

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My 270 (A Rem 700 ADL) shoots best with 130gr Hornady SST. But I would hardly label it's performance with 150gr bullets unacceptable. Great cartridge!

Myself, I would probably use the 130s for deer. Even the 130gr SST always passes clean through any deer I have ever killed with one. I have never hunted hogs, but based on what I see stated by regular hog hunters here and elsewhere I would probably opt for 150gr bullets were I to find myself on my first hog hunt so long as accuracy is sufficient for the job.
 

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270 Win whitetail/hog bullet

That's easy. 150 gr Nosler Partition and never look back!:)
 

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Tried a half dozen common brands of commercial .270 Winchester ammo in weights of 130, 140 and 150 grain when I first got my Win 270 rifle. Surprisingly it shot sub-moa with all of them. Tried mixing brands with the same weight of bullet still sub-moa. Decided to mix weights and brands - group opened vertically to about 1 1/2 moa. The last several whitetails and mule deer that I shot with a center-fire fell to that rifle, also a pronghorn and a mountain goat. Although I've used all three weights on game, I lean toward the heavier bullets as they seem to cause less meat damage. I'll probably keep that rifle as one of my last as I dispose of the others when my hunting ability winds down or as I move to the more challenging archery hunting. Since I only use it to hunt and usually fire only 1 shot to check the zero before going hunting the ammo I have left will probably last the rest of my hunting life (although I did buy dies just in case). It's the only .20 I've ever had. Sixty years ago I "looked down my nose" at .270s thinking the .30-06 was far better, now I'd be comfortable with either as an only center-fire rifle. It's a common brand not often mentioned here as the manufacturer is generally thought of as making overpriced status symbols rather than working rifles. It's a Weatherby Mark V Ultramark Lightweight with a 24" barrel.
 

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130, 140s, 150s+ .270 Winchester are all adequate for elk, moose and piggies, no matter how big and shagnasty they be! The "shield" isn't armor plate! :cool:

Of course, I did see a hog once that I thought was a small cow! :eek:

Then, the shoot...don't shoot...how close is that tree, and can I reach the lowest branch? comes into the equation!

Hit them well with any of the .270 bullet weights, and they will die! ;)
 

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I have only one load suggestion for hogs.... 140 gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claw. (the Federal box stuff shoots under 1" @ 100 for me and right at 1" at 225 out of a Browning 78 High Wall) That load is devastating is all I can say. I also use the same bullet in my .338 Win Mag heavy game load (heavier bullet of course)

As to White tails and Mule Deer under 500 yards same gun except Hornady Custom ammo 140 gr Boat Tail Spire Point Inter lock. The bullet enters the chest cavity, explodes and there is no exit. All that is left in the boiler room is shaky jello. Do not be close and down hill when you gut a deer thus shot cause its all gonna come out in a rush when you stick the diaphragm....... Just sayin. I will add, some deer especially big uns will take a few steps sometimes with this load. I have put second shots into necks only to find out a short time later that deer was walking dead......
 

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Lots of old timers here in Utah use the 150rn in the .270 for mule deer/elk. Funny, I've seen more Remington 721s and 722s than Model 70s in .270!
Love the 721. It was Remington's first model after the war. The 721 was the long action with the 722 being the short action receiver. They were made from 1948 till 1962 when the 700 came out. I am sure this period saw many Veterans buying bolt rifles. The 721 is an accurate receiver with it's most noteworthy feature being the odd operating 3 position safety. I have read that many were converted to the 700 safety after it came out.
I have a 35 Whelan built on the 721 receiver. The safety is unconverted. Once I take it from safe to fire I have to lift the bolt to put it back on safe. It is one of my more accurate guns and a favorite. Whoever built the gun did a fantastic job on the trigger!
 

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Congratulations on a fine new rifle! I own several .270s at this time and usually decide on bullet weight by letting the rifle tell me. As a couple examples, one of my M70s loves 150gr, while the other loves 130gr. My M700Ti likes 140gr TBBC and a #1RSI liked 130gr "X".

I'd lean towards 150gr NPs, but 130s should work just fine. The fronts will open quickly, but the rear shank will more than likely continue on through, albeit at a lesser diameter. We dug out and inspected a 30 cal NP at the camp We visited last month.

We passed it around studying the "remnants". Only a very small portion of the front jacket remained and no lead was left. The rear shank was intact, completely and it was a worthwhile discussion about how NPs are designed to perform for those present who were not familiar.

Two other bullets I'd use for your needs would be the 140gr Accubond and 140gr TBBC. I got an up close look at the effects of a 140gr TBBC on a very large (~ 300 pounds)hog that had the Skinner of that hog asking what kind of bullet out of a .270 did that kind of damage. Shot distance was about 60 yards.

Good luck!
+1 On this! You won't get any better advice!

Jim
The AV8R's
 
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