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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking at some of the 3 point slings our there, they look pretty handy.. would be a nice thing to have on a guide gun or dangerous game rifle... it lets you carry the rifle from numerous positions and you can also hang it on your back if your hiking for long periods of time, or you can drape it to the front of you when your in an area that has hot activity and it doesn't tire your arms out like regular slings do or just carry the rifle all day which can affect longer range accuracy...

I saw the specter sling the one that has 1.5" thick webbing, and has the option of quick release buckle, but i'm not sure if i can find one that would work on my rifle... does anyone know anything about these kinds of slings that could help?
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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I have used all kinds of slings over the last 50 years. I too like the three point sling for target shooting but for extended carry I favor the new neoprene type slings that stretch and give as you walk. Most of my rifles have this type with the four cartridge loops built on the sling. This allows me to keep four rounds with each rifle in the vault and ready for hunting. No matter which rifle I pick up, I have four rounds for the gun. If you carry a rifle all day as on an elk hunt, the stretchable slings become much appreciated. They are much softer on the shoulder and do not slip off like slick leather or web. Just my $.02 worth.
 

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My only experience was the training given on the Eric Ching's variant of the CW sling at Gunsite. The Ching sling is indeed one handy and fast configuration. It's basic use is described in Cooper's Art of the Rifle. At school we learned standing quick mounts from both conventional muzzle-up and muzzle down (African carry) shoulder carry positions with it, proving it is apropos to both carry and rapid mounting, as intended. It worked fine.

The one place a sling is a bit underfoot in the field is in snap shooting. We were taught to control the slack by trapping the sling between our weak hand ring and middle finger and pushing most of the excess forward in mounting the snap shot. This is so you don't get into standing position with what amounts to a sling pendulum swinging beneath your rifle, pulling your POA left and right, or worse, having it snag on a bit of brush. A very wide or heavy sling would increase the encumbrance in snap shooting situations, and for that reason is not the best choice where dangerous game might charge unexpectedly. The wide sling has obvious appeal for long treks, but if you are in a location with the potential for being charged by dangerous game, you'd be better off to pad the top of the shoulder of your clothing than using a wider, heavier sling, IMHO.

See if you can find people who have what you are looking at so you can try it? Everyone is a little different, and I think that's the best way to find out what fits you?
 

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Try tactical tailor in Washington. Great stuff very durable and functional. I had one of their slings on a mossberg 12 ga that was taken by burglers. still need to replace the sling. http://www.tacticaltailor.com/slings.aspx they may have other models not listed on this page.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have used all kinds of slings over the last 50 years. I too like the three point sling for target shooting but for extended carry I favor the new neoprene type slings that stretch and give as you walk. Most of my rifles have this type with the four cartridge loops built on the sling. This allows me to keep four rounds with each rifle in the vault and ready for hunting. No matter which rifle I pick up, I have four rounds for the gun. If you carry a rifle all day as on an elk hunt, the stretchable slings become much appreciated. They are much softer on the shoulder and do not slip off like slick leather or web. Just my $.02 worth.
thanks brother
 

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Discussion Starter #6
My only experience was the training given on the Eric Ching's variant of the CW sling at Gunsite. The Ching sling is indeed one handy and fast configuration. It's basic use is described in Cooper's Art of the Rifle. At school we learned standing quick mounts from both conventional muzzle-up and muzzle down (African carry) shoulder carry positions with it, proving it is apropos to both carry and rapid mounting, as intended. It worked fine.

The one place a sling is a bit underfoot in the field is in snap shooting. We were taught to control the slack by trapping the sling between our weak hand ring and middle finger and pushing most of the excess forward in mounting the snap shot. This is so you don't get into standing position with what amounts to a sling pendulum swinging beneath your rifle, pulling your POA left and right, or worse, having it snag on a bit of brush. A very wide or heavy sling would increase the encumbrance in snap shooting situations, and for that reason is not the best choice where dangerous game might charge unexpectedly. The wide sling has obvious appeal for long treks, but if you are in a location with the potential for being charged by dangerous game, you'd be better off to pad the top of the shoulder of your clothing than using a wider, heavier sling, IMHO.

See if you can find people who have what you are looking at so you can try it? Everyone is a little different, and I think that's the best way to find out what fits you?
thanks for the post, very informative and interesting experience
 

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I just got some 3 Point slings off ebay and noted the Specter 3 Point with the sliding adjustment which seems to be very unique since it will quickly allow you go to off shoulder position quickly. There is a youtube segment on it.

Think I will probably wind up with one as I just changed out a bolt gun sight system and added a Aimtech Second Sight Scope base and a 3-9 scope above and thinking about using it as a car/truck rifle and moving the AR back to the safe.

Bolt gun is a 30.06 and I figure to zero it for POA/POI at 300 yards and figure out where the front sight zeros with the Aimtech rear. With a 300 yard zero aiming 12" high at 400 will be right where I want it to impact.
 
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