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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to reloading, bought a Dillon Square b a couple of months ago, learned alot, made over 700 45acp. Now I want to make rifle bullets, bought a hornady classic kit.
Question
Accurate 4350 powder
bullet .308 150gr
measure 48.1-57.0
Would it be wise to start with 50.0gm?
Also If i have new brass, do I need to lube it, or just press the bullet on?
Thanx
 

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Marky,

First and foremost, welcome to the forum! Rules are simple: Be nice and join in.

As to your questions, I would be sure to follow the load recipe in your reloading manual. (You DO have a reloading manual, right??) Bottle-necked brass cartridges need to be lubed during every resizing operation, but the bullet being seated in a bottle-necked case does not need lube, unless you are referring to a cast bullet, which may need lube. I'm not too familiar with that operation, so I'll let one of the cast boolit guys answer, if that's what you're asking about.
 

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I do not have an AA4350 load. According to the new Hornady manual 50 gr would be a good starting load for the 150 gr bullet. I hunt with a 165 gr bullet and use a similar velocity load because my shots are 150 yds or less. If you are strictly shooting target at long range you will have to work up a lot to get to an accurate load that is closer to 3000 fps. The powder you have chosen is one according to the manual that will reach that velocity but with a compressed load.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, yes I have the Hornady & Lymnan Manuel, even went to the Accurate web site. I'll start with 50gr
Question The brass is brand new, I added the primers last night. Do I need to resize new brass with the first die or can I just
seat the bullet with the second die, it's a single stage press
 

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It's a good idea to run the new brass through the resizing die, if for nothing else than to round out the case mouth as most new brass will not be all that round to accept the bullet. If you've already primed without sizing, you can always back the depriming rod out of the die far enough so that you still pass the expander button through the neck, but won't punch your primer out.
 

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In my opinion all new brass should be re-sized and chamfered and deburred before hand.Bottle or straight neck. There is a lot of bouncing around before it got to you , so why not? It don't take that much time to just make sure all is sized ok. Just my 2 cents. Bob
 

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I've heard guys say the bullet will make the neck round, when you seat it, but to my way of thinking, there is no way the neck tension could possibly be equal all the way around, if you go about it that way. Definitely best to size new cases, at least the neck, before loading the first time.
 

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I agree with sizing first.At least necksizing.A boattail bullet will make the neck round but its not so good with a flatbase.You could shave a good bit off the bullet that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have the BoatTail, they seem to go together good I shot 10 rds with 50gr today a little low. I made 20 more with
51.2gr tonight
 

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You normally don't want to go up more than about .5 grains at a time because 1.2 grains is more than enough to skip over an accuracy sweet spot. As you approach a maximum pressure it can be dangerous to go up that much, especially if the load is compressed. However, you will find the Accurate 4350 powder is really too slow for 150 grain bullets in the the .30-06. Even a full case (short of compression) will only just get to .30-06 starting load pressures with that bullet weight. That is why the Accurate load manual doesn't have .30-06 loads for weights under 165 grains listed for that powder. I don't know what rifle you are using, but shooting a Garand you would absolutely have to avoid any brand of 4350 powder because they all create too much a muzzle pressure to be safe for the op-rod, and might bend it. A smaller charge of a faster powder is the solution for gas operated guns.

Accurate 4064 would be a good choice. IMR4064, Varget, and just about any brand of 4895 are all easier to get best accuracy loads with in the .30-06, though I have also had some good results from IMR3031, which used to be more commonly used with lighter bullets in this chambering. I find IMR4064 loaded to push the 150 grain Hornady BT FMJ at about 2700 fps from a 24" barrel winds up producing about the best accuracy I can get from that bullet, and doesn't produce muzzle pressures unacceptable to the Garand. For shorter ranges (to 200 yards) IMR3031 loaded to about the same velocity is accurate enough and produces even lower muzzle pressure, making it easier on the Garand op-rod. If you want to learn a good method of finding accuracy loads, read Dan Newberry's round robin method.
 

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Mark,

In case it wasn't readily apparent, Nick really knows his stuff, when it comes to reloading. I would adhere to his recommendations almost as closely as your reloading manuals...which apparently don't suggest using the powder/bullet combination you've chosen?
 
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