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I have a chart put out by Handloader several years ago comparing bullets for penetration.The Rem corelok was right there with the premium bullets and some case was better.I would go with your 300 Savage if you are comfortable with it.Just keep your shots under 250 yrds or so.Remember a gut shot Bull will run into the worst canyon the same as one shot with a 416 or super 30's and I can assure you the fun is over.
Shoot a lot of rounds from different positions until it is 2nd nature.
 

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Having been an elk guide for 9 years, I have either killed myself or seen over 100 elk killed, so I do have some experence. I have never killed an elk with a 300 Savage or had a client use one either. I have seen elk killed with many calibers from a 22 handgun to a 416 Taylor. The 300 Savage should be a good round to @250 yards IF the animal is standing broadside. Angle shots I would reduce the range a bit. Elk hunting isnt like it is potrayed on television. Most of those are "canned" hunts. Elk seldom follow a script. I have to disagree with choice of bullets some recommend. I have nearly 200 bullets I have taken from game animals and I have had dismal results from Cor-Lokts, Silvertips, and Sierra bullets. I have a handful of these bullets that desentigrated with minimal penatration. They must build better bullets where others come from than what they sell here. Elk are big, tough, heavy boned animals. I have always had good results with Nosler partions on everything from coyotes to buffalo. One reply mentioned a Handloader penatration test. I havent seen this particular article but big game hunting is SO far different than ballistic gelitin that no comparison can be made.
 

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I made a 30 caliber wildcat that shoots very similar velocities to the 300 savage. I have shot so many different bullets. Accubond 165s penetrate great but speed is 2450 FPS and exit holes on antelope and deer are half dollar sized. Go to 165 ballistic tips and exit hole is maybe silver dollar sized. Go to 150 Ballistic tips and it gets a little bigger. 150g Hornady SST going 2550 FPS fragmented and lodged behind the hide of the offside shoulder of a deer at 170 yards after penetrating both shoulders. Not sure that much fragmentation would drop an elk. Almost prefer going back to the 165 premium which would penetrate deeper.

Speed delivers shock, which puts the animal on the ground faster. Under 2700 FPS cup and core works well, but penetrates less deep. So here is my next test, how about getting velocity above 2700 FPS and using a premium bullet? I am going to try the 125 Accubond at around 2800 FPS. More speed will drop the animal faster, while the bonded bullet retains it weight better, which allows it to penetrate farther. It defies the "energy" logic, but I think it might work.

Three other ideas on this type of round.

1).The slower bullet penetrates deeper than a faster bullet, because the slower bullet doesn't mushroom out as big. Shoot the animal through both shoulders. The slower bullet will penetrate, it just doesn't mushroom as big. If you hit bone, your animal drops quicker.

2). If you reload your ammo, consider using a flat based bullet, as it leaves more room in the case for powder and you will get higher velocities, and better energy.

3). Because this round is a little slower in velocity, you want to use a more frangible (think cup and core) bullet to get the expansion at slower speeds, yet you need the bullet to retain weight to get penetration (think weight retainer like accubond or triple shock). This really makes the flat base Nosler Partition with its frangible tip and weight retaining back portion of the bullet (behind the partition plate), perhaps the best bullet for this cartridge. Flat base yields higher velocity, frangible tip mushrooms out nice, yet the weight retaining portion penetrates deep.

I also would suggest range on elk to be around 300 yards max, but with the right bullet and alot of practice, deer and antelope could be extended to 500 yards with this round.

The .308 bullet is the perfect balance between getting started with enough speed, and being slender enough as it flies through the air to retain energy.
 

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I think I would use the Barnes 130 TTSX or, at most, the aforementioned 150 TTSX. Trainloads ( I'm pretty sure...) of elk have been killed with the Mod 99 300 Savage. Great saddle rifle, plenty accurate. I don't know if the 150 or 180 was best, back then, but a lot of folks used them!
 

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The only caliber the 180 grain silvertips worked in was the 300 Savage.

RJ
 

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People for the most part don't hunt like they used to, my father and his brothers would take two weeks off and go to the flattops and hunt from dawn to dusk everyday of the season. most folks now take a Friday and and a Monday maybe a Tuesday off to try and get an elk. Likewise elk have gotten harder to hunt, the ones that have survived to breed were the same ones that act more like whitetails than elk going nocturnal at the first hint of human activity in the woods. Big ranches that have leased out there places often go out a week ahead of time on horses and push elk from the neighboring public lands onto their places. I've seen elk standing on top of bald mountains above timberline a week after seasons begin where no one but rock climbers could reach them.
Talk to an oldtimer who hunted elk in the 50's and 60's when these renaissance calibers like the 300 savage were popular and they'll tell you this was not how it was back then on public land.
If your going to hunt on private property it probably doesn't matter what caliber you use but if your not you may only get one shot and it may not be your standing broadside picture perfect shot inside 200 yards in which case you might want a little more gun for bad angle long shots. Add to that wounded elk have a tendency to run into the nastiest places like downed timber or over the top of saddles into the next drainage, not an issue if your 30 years old and in prime shape.
People talk about using enough gun for elk, my opinion after spending my teen years helping recover elk with the last generation is use more than enough gun, all my cousins have got 300 Weatherby's now because they were there with me!
 

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Yep, only hunted them once just south of Jackson Hole and we rode in for an hour and a half but even then the herds we saw where already moving to higher ground and this became obvious when we sat eating our lunch on a ridge and looked back towards the trail head. There where orange suited rifle totting humans marching...I mean marching up through the trees like they are on a Sunday afternoon walk, not hunting. We eventually caught up with the tail of one herd and culled a cow but we had ridden our horses for half an hour to get within hunting distance.
To answer the question and having researched the cartridge, then yes, I would have no problem carrying that calibre for elk but would want to use my stalking skills to get in close and be sure of placing that bullet on the critical spot....BUT , there again thats what I try to do with all deer I hunt.
Have fun.
 

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In my experience, it is mostly bullet construction, bullet placement and reasonable range. Velocity is a factor where range comes in. The magnums seem to extend the range about a hundred yards or so. In my experience the .30 caliber bullets seem to work really well and out range smaller and bigger bullets. They are very efficient. The .300 Savage is about the least I would use and I would be careful to avoid a quartering shot that will soak up penetration. I would try to keep my shot under 200 yards, too, and try for something closer to 100 when possible. I prefer a heart-lung shot, but a shoulder hit will often stop him with some meat loss.

I shot an Idaho bull years ago with a .338 Win. Mag. at 125 yards. He went down immediately but we found the 225 gr. Sierra broke apart half way through the high lung shot and a fragment pierced the spine. That bullet piece stopped him but he would have kept going into the timber if it had not, only to die much later. My partner shot a bear that morning with his .338 and a Bitterroot bullet which mushroomed perfectly in a well placed raking shot.

30-30 Remchester has good advice based on experience.

Sometimes these old threads are fun to read.
 

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On youtube there is a video by billy molls guiding his father in alaska, his father used his own father's gun iirc it was a 99 savage in 300 sav with iron sights. The caribou was drt. OK a big caribou isn't quite as large as a big elk but they still big.
I think the video is called hunt for the unknown.
 

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I grew up in elk camp about 70 years ago, All my family used 30-30s, 30-40s, the younger skip and fetchet school kids where tought to shoot with the 25-35 as a rule and to keep shots at 100 yards or less, and it worked well for all of us.. One uncle used a 300 savage got a lot of teasing for using such a large caliber rifle that ruined too much meat..I always said Id have one of those some day and I did shoot 3 or 4 elk with it using 180 gr. corelokt factory ammo, and it worked well indeed...Today however I tend to use my 06 or 338 Win...Would I use a 300 Savage today. Probably not as I prefer the 06 and 338 much better, but if anyone wants to use the 300 SAvage and will keep ranges at 300 yards or less, Id have no problem with that..It worked back then and Im sure that hasn't changed much if you can shoot well and not take Iffy shots..
 

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On youtube there is a video by billy molls guiding his father in alaska, his father used his own father's gun iirc it was a 99 savage in 300 sav with iron sights. The caribou was drt. OK a big caribou isn't quite as large as a big elk but they still big.
I think the video is called hunt for the unknown.
Out of curiosity, I watched this video yesterday. He actually said it was a 303 Savage he used on that caribou! Closer to a 30-30 that a 300 Savage. Very interesting. :)
 

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I love my leverguns and 3 of the ones I have are a 2012 Mossberg 464 in 30-30, a 1949 Savage 99 in 300 Savage, and a 1959 Winchester 88 in .308. I handload for all of them and using 150grn bullets as a baseline, the 300 Savage produces velocities about 2/3 of the way up from my 30-30 to my .308. That said, with a 165grn bullet (my favorite bullet weights for them) my 300 Savage clocks 2,330fps using Win 748 while my .308 Winchester clocks 2,690fps with Win 760.





 

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Back in my youth, we left our ranch in the Texas Big Bend and sashayed to Colorado for elk with 18 to 20 head of broke mules, ride or pack..Us kids spent all year breaking them for the trip. Dads, uncles, cousins and went and we stayed until everbody filled a tag, It was a yearly family gathering, under a tarp, not tents....not for the light of heart.
At the end of the hunt we auctioned off the mules to local guides and hunters at Chimney Rock Store..

Mostly we used Win 94s in 30-30, the kids used 25-35s, one uncle used a mod 95 30-40 Krag and another a Savage 99 in 300 Savage caliber with 180 gr. Corelokts..He took a lot of ribbing about that big ole gun and how much meat it ruined etc, etc...He killed his elk every year with it and never shot twice, I swore when I got away from the family that I would buy me a 300 Savage, and that dream gun came true some may years later, but in the form of a Savage 99F in .308 Win...it worked too..I would not hesitate to shoot elk today with either, but there are better calibers out there..just keep the range under 300 yards and the 300 will do its job, just like my 338 Win.
 

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Why is it everyone chooses to ignore one hundred years of historical data and believe some supposed expert gun writer who tells you that you need the latest thunder-boomer magnum to kill elk? **** Lewis and Clark killed them with 40 caliber flintlock single shots.
 

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I recently gave my son a late inherited Savage 99 in a 300 Savage caliber. He used it this year to DRT a large South Texas whitetail using a handload of 150 gr Speer BTSP over 41.5 gr of IMR-4895. It gets about 2600 ft/sec. My son shot it through both shoulders blades and he learned later that he lost a lot of meat versus a shot through the ribs. The bullet did I fine job through the bones and I am sure it would do very well on elk under 300 yards, as long as it is a rib shot. He really doesn't like to shoot very far as he's a hand gun guy.
 
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