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I am trying to find some data for reloading the 303 British with 150-173 gr jacketed slugs and Alliant 2400 powder.  I want to be able to get 1700-2000 fps.  I know C.E. Harris lists 18-21 grs of 2400 with 180-200 gr gaschecked slugs for 1700-1850 fps.  I also looked in Lymans 46th edition handbook and found that for the 30-40 Krag  (which holds 1 more grain of water, but has a max pressure listed at 5000 CUP less then the 303) they list 18-23 grs of 2400 with a 169 gr gaschecked slug for 1647-1964 fps.   I know that jacketed slugs cause higher pressure but since most of these loads are for heavier cast bullets  I am thinking using the starting loads and working up from there.  Any comments or opinions are welcome.
PS= the reason I want to use 2400 is I have a large supply on hand and most of my shooting will be plinking at less then 200 yards.  I also have a supply of AA1680 if anyone has data for using it for these types of loads.  Thanks.  James.
 

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Alliant 2400 would not be my first choice for such a project, but since you have a quantity on hand it is worth a go. I would stick to 173-180 grain bullets to fill as much airspace as possible. There will be a lot using 2400. You'll also need some sort of filler, as much to keep the powder against the primer as anything else.
I'd start with 15.5 grains and a 180. Don't be surprised if the first test batch sticks in the barrel! This is a bit of exploration, so be cautious and increase charges in small amounts.

The .303 and the Enfields it is chambered in are a great combination. I've enjoyed them for years. Keep us posted.
 

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Bill,

Have you ever used AA 2495 BR powder in the 303 or the 30/40. Have a few pounds of it, wanted to see if you have any experience with it in these rounds.


Thanks,

:cool:
 

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The 1935 Hercules Powder Phamplet for 2400 Rifle Powder (it was originally developed for the .22 Hornet)
shows the following loads:

150 gr. - 16.0grs.   1540 f.p.s.     15,200p.s.i.
              21.2         1970              28,000

174 gr. - 15.0          1340              14,500
              19.5          1725              28,000

215 gr.    13.0          1080              15,500
              18.5          1480              28,000

210 gr. gas checked
               13.0         1290               14,600
               18.6         1645               28,000

They mention that it gives superior results in mid range or reduced loads in many of the larger cartridges, 30-06, etc.  They do not mention using fillers of any kind.  

A friend of mine uses 22 grs. in a .30-06 under the 220 gr. Lyman 311284 bullet and gets  excellent accuracy all the way out to 500 meters.  

Good luck,
Jack
 

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John,

Thanks for the rather unique posting. I'd love to get my hands on that pamphlet myself.

Just out of curiosity I e-mailed Alliant regarding the validity of the 1935 data. My main interest was in the common belief that 2400 is somewhat faster than in days of old. I just received a response from Ben Amonette and thought you al may find it interesting:


>I too have heard it said that 2400 seems to be faster but we have not
> changed the recipe.  As for the old data, that is hard for me to say.  We do
> not have any loads for 2400 in the 303 B.  We do for the 30-06 however so
> the idea is not too far fetched.  If you try the old data, do so with
> caution.  Back in that day, liability was a different issue than it is now.
> Thanks for your interest in our powder and have a nice day.
>
> Ben Amonette
> Consumer Service Manager
> Alliant Powder Company
> www.alliantpowder.com

So JFD, I'd say use the starting data provided by Mr. Kort and slowly work your way up and you should be in good shape. In fact, I think I'll do some of my own and post as soon as I have the results. Thanks again John.
 

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I have used 2400 in both pistol and rifle loads over the years and have found that i had to now reduce the max loads down ! If you look at old and newer reloading manuals you will also see about a 2 grain less difference ! I used to use a 14.5 grain 2400 load in any of my military loads with cast bullets ! It should still be safe in most but not the same as it used to be ! Same goes for mag. pistol loads ! 2400 is now faster burning then it was ! Why ? Something was changed ! JAGG
 

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A lot of new loading manuals are showing reduced powder charges than older manuals for the same components for many different cartridges. Some of that is due to much more precise pressure measuring equipment available today. Some older loads are showing a higher pressure with new measuring equipment than it did with the old copper crusher method of testing.
Another reason is lawyers and lawsuits. Old military rifles such as the .303 British and 8mm Mausers date back many years and some old rifles still in use were made before the 1920s are not as strong as rifles made during the later years. Today both the .303 and the 8mm Mauser factory loads are much reduced from their original military loadings.
 
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