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Discussion Starter #1
Could the .313 diameter 115 gr. bullet be used in the .32 S&W Long? If so, could someone reccomend a good load? I realize this bullet is a bit heavy for that application but I would like to buy all my bullets from one source. Besides I might need a backup for my 454 while bear hunting (ha-ha).
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                                                  Dave
 

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Yes, perhaps a little heavy, but keep in mind the advantage using the WFN profile (which is what the .313"-115g FNPB profile is, just in smaller caliber).  This profile will provide about the same internal case capacity as using a standard 90 grain bullet in this cartridge.  

For a load in the .32 S&W Long try these:

BTB .313"-115g FNPB/2.2g AA #2/WSPP/Rem Brass/874 fps.

BTB .313"-115g FNPB/2.5g Universal Clays/WSPP/Rem Brass/826 fps.

BTB .313"-115g FNPB/2.0 Titegroup/WSPP/Rem Brass/812 fps.

This should get you started!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #3
While reading all of the suggested loads in the various calibers it occured to me that the data is very similar to jacketed bullets of the same weight.  As an example, can I use data for the .44 Magnum 240 gr. jacketed bullets with the BTB240gr. WFN? Is leading a problem up to 1250-1300 fps with plain-base bullets? I'm new to high-performance cast bullet shooting. I've only used cast bullets in the .45acp and reduced .50ae loads so please excuse my ignorance.
                                           Thanks to everyone helping
                                                   Dave
 

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Mr. Saye,

Your observations are absolutely correct.   Using the LBT design bullets that we offer in the handgun calibers, you can definitely use the loading data for comparable weight jacketed bullets as a starting point for the LBT design cast bullets.  Again, I will remind you that the unique design of these bullets gives a greater internal case capacity, because more weight of the bullet is outside the case.   As a result, at least in handgun cases, you actually will have a higher velocity potential with the bullets we manufacture than with equal weight jacketed pills.

Also, these cast bullets have a lower friction coefficient than jacketed bullets.  If all other factors were equal, down to the physical size and shape, you would still have a higher velocity generated with equal powder charges using the cast bullet, due to the lower friction coefficient of the lead alloy.

Now, keeping both of these factors in mind, you will find that it is not uncommon for top loads using our bullets to reach top velocities and efficiency without hitting top pressure levels, often with powder charges exceeding published data for like weight projectiles.

About your question regarding velocities and leading.  The 1250-1300 fps threshold you mention is perfect plain base bullet velocity.  You should experience no problems at all!  Leading is a function of several factors, and if the bullets fit the throats of your revolvers properly, and jacket fouling is removed from the bore prior to shooting cast, you will have no leading problems at those velocities.

Welcome to the world of premium cast bullets!

God Bless,

Marshall
 
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