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Eyeballing without a bore scope, an antique 32/20 of my dad’s has what looks like a decent barrel. I see rifling no pitting. I admit I don’t know much about inspecting a barrel The rest of the rifle is in very good shape.

Any suggestions?
 

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I'm gonna assume factory ammo, if not please say so.

The rifling is frequently worn out near the muzzle, that last 1-1½". Run a snug fitting patch thru the bore, try to feel for spots that are easier for the patch to move thru. These 'loose' areas can indicate either worn rifling or a bulge in the barrel.

A bulge can usually be seen or felt. Look down the length of the barrel with your eye as close as possible to the bore-line, you are attempting to see a bump that indicates where the barrel expanded creating the bulge. Also try running your fingers down the outside of the barrel, you are attempting to feel the raised bulge.

Bulges that contribute to keyholing are usually between the front sight and the muzzle.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Crown damage would be the first thing I would check. .32WCF rifles aren't generally high volume varmit cartridges, nor should they operate at barrel-burning pressures, so something mechanical is most likely. You might also slug the bore, after a thorough cleaning, to determine if it is oversize relative to the ammunition you have.

A different box of factory ammo, if you can find any, might shed light on the issue.

Good luck
 

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You might have ammo that has projectiles that are .308 intended for modern guns.
Might be an oversize bore as well.
If the bore looks good it should be .

Cheers.
 

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Have owned and shot over 2500 different firearms including Blackpowder, Antiques, & Modern.
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Try checking the muzzle to see if it is damaged. Example attached. The bottom muzzle is the good one.
 

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Crown damage would be the first thing I would check. .32WCF rifles aren't generally high volume varmit cartridges, nor should they operate at barrel-burning pressures, so something mechanical is most likely. You might also slug the bore, after a thorough cleaning, to determine if it is oversize relative to the ammunition you have.

A different box of factory ammo, if you can find any, might shed light on the issue.

Good luck
I saw the header and thought 32wcf...I'd be into the 30/30 case with a 32 bullet. Maybe I'm thinking 32 win spl. Not sure on my part as I never reloaded for weither cal. Anyhow whichever it is I'd think crown wear and or throat erosion .
 

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32-20 win

The OP has his title as 32WCF but then shows he's asking about the old 32-20 cartridge. So I think we've been chasing our tail.
Hasn't come back for a while so probably thinks our cheese has slipped off our cracker.:eek:
All in all his got some ideas on where to start. Crown, bore, throat , etc
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for feedback

Was waiting for weekend when I could see my dad’s rifle again. It seems in good pretty fine condition, with no large muzzle defects. No bulges. And while I don’t have a borescope to do a real inspection, the muzzle end seemed to have nice rifling.

Perhaps a lighter (or shorter) bullet would stabilize?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
LOL, not trying to confuse anyone. It says 32 W.C.F on the barrel, just ahead of the receiver on the top flat of the octagonal barrel. I’m not very familiar with that caliber, though it seems nice And not too loud for its closer-range varmint purpose.
 

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Simple solutions

Eyeballing without a bore scope, an antique 32/20 of my dad’s has what looks like a decent barrel. I see rifling no pitting. I admit I don’t know much about inspecting a barrel The rest of the rifle is in very good shape.

Any suggestions?
May be a good idea to take it to your local gunsmith if your unsure of the state of the rifle. Looks can be deceiving, if your not sure what your looking for.
 

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Slug the barrel to see what the bore diameter is. I use an egg sinker with hole down the center that is close to the bore size. You might need to go up to bullets that are .314 in diameter. Measure the bullet on the ammo you are using. If the bullet is undersized compared to the bore than that is probbaly the issue.
 

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When I tried to get a load going for my little single shot I was under the impression it was .308 bore.
I tried every Bullet I had and nearly every thing key holed.
200 grn were sticking out of the pine log backer with there tips pointing out.
That was at only 20 mtrs.
I have tried bullets for 303 Brit and 310 cadet all with no good results.
The only thing I have not done is slug the bore , just haven't found the time.
Obviously in hindsight I could of spent the time all ready spent to slug the bore but it was interesting none the less.
The plan is to have a nice break open 32-20 improved in the safe.

The 200 mtr can plinker.
Seems a bit ambitious at the moment, more like a split frame shot gun.

Cool round .

Cheers.
 

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When I tried to get a load going for my little single shot I was under the impression it was .308 bore.
I tried every Bullet I had and nearly every thing key holed.
200 grn were sticking out of the pine log backer with there tips pointing out.
That was at only 20 mtrs.
I have tried bullets for 303 Brit and 310 cadet all with no good results.
The only thing I have not done is slug the bore , just haven't found the time.
Obviously in hindsight I could of spent the time all ready spent to slug the bore but it was interesting none the less.
The plan is to have a nice break open 32-20 improved in the safe.

The 200 mtr can plinker.
Seems a bit ambitious at the moment, more like a split frame shot gun.

Cool round .

Cheers.
200 grain is WAY too heavy for a 32-20 to drive fast enough to stabilize. Wouldn't feed anyway in a Winchester 92. I have a 1912 vintage 92 in 32-20 and it's a tack driver loaded to HV-92 specs with 115 gr lead bullets. These are .312 dia. bullets loaded over W-296 to HV-92 velocities (around 1800 fps as I recall)
 
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