Shooters Forum banner
  • Hello Everyone! Let us know what you would spend a $50 Amazon gift card on, HERE For a chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card!
1 - 20 of 111 Posts

·
The Shadow (Moderator)
Joined
·
10,050 Posts
Lever action re-barrels aren't as widely advertised as regular gunsmithing services, as a bolt action is. Meaning it's not more of a specialty thing, and not something widely listed publicly.
Unless you have someone local to you willing to do it, probably the best bet would be to go to Turnbull Restorations and request a quote from them.

As a pure WAG, I'd say expect something like $350, not counting the barrel. But that could be way off in the tuplips.

Cheers
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
38,172 Posts
You're going to need oversized locking blocks, a rebarrel, or possibly both. How out of spec is it, and what cartridge?

Indeed, not as simple as setting the barrel back on say a Remington 700, etc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
How much excess have you got with what cartridge? What caused the excess headspace?
Welcome to the forum.
I'm curious about your rifle. Marlin's are always loose on headspace and it causes no problems except for the handloader that likes to hot-rod.
If it's separating factory loads, it's time to have it set back, otherwise your rifle is probably 'normal'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,360 Posts
What Jack said ^ I had two Marlins that were loose, shot thousands of rounds out of one of them at cowboy silhouette without any issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It is a 1968 30/30 that looks like new. It would close on a no go gauge. Federal ammo and components work ok, but it misfires on remington and Winchester ammo.
I assume the headspace wasn't adjusted correctly at the factory.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
Any Marlin will spring the action enough to close the bolt on a NO GO gauge. Was the bolt stripped, the gauge put under the extractor then the bolt closed by pushing with a finger tip to feel the gauge?
Don't worry about it. The gun is right enough most likely. That JMB stamp means it was proofed. It was right when it left the factory. It now has .010 over GO (because you closed the bolt on a NO GO) and ten thou is OK.
The miss fires are another problem. I would bet Hoppes to donuts the factory grease is still in the firing pin tunnel OR the rear firing pin tunnel. Both pins should move freely. Clean the springs, also. Marlin grease must gave come from Blue Marlins. It stinks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rvance

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The bolt wasn't stripped and I don't know about the extractor. The one who did it went to a 2 year gunsmithing school but never got into it.
All of the common tests were for misfires were tried. The inside of the bolt was cleaned thoroughly with pipe cleaners, solvent etc. The bolt face tape indicated the headspace was ok. A new rear firing pin, coil spring, and spring on top of the bolt were added. A good lever was tried. The front firing pin should be good considering the pin projection measurement.
Can't remember about the bolt spring grease but it was probably cleaned too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
The gunsmith with the gun in his hands is better than somebody trying to guess by internet.
Primers fire by impact. If the impact is there, there should be fire.
Fill a primer pocket with grease-based modeling clay. Smooth it up like it was a primer and try it in the gun. That shows actual FP strike. The foward FP has an inertial component to it that can't be seen by simply pushing on it.
Headspace on a 30-30 is the thickness of the rim. That dimension doesn't change between brands, so having failures with one and not another makes little sense either.
Shorter answer---I don't know and would have to run my own test to figure it out.
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
38,172 Posts
Federal primers are reputed to be a bit more sensitive than other brands, so that's a possible answer. Agreed that you need to get the firing pin protrusion checked. The rim thickness on the Federal cases could be a tad more, also. Check with a dial caliper. If you don't own one, you need to buy one.

If you have the no-go gage, start putting layers of tape on the back and see how many it takes to hang it up closing the bolt. If you don't, use any fired case and do the same. Get back to us with some numbers.

Handloading? Need to set the resizing die to just size the case enough. That's another way to solve the problem. Another possibility is to do what .303 Brit shooters do with way oversized chambers to prolong brass life - slide a tiny o-ring in the extractor groove to hold the cartridge base against the bolt. It would take a little experimenting to figure out the right size, but should be a cheap enough solution. For a gun that slings a few bullets at deer every year, a small bother. You may, or may not, be able to get away with neck-sizing cases. It isn't supposed to be possible with lever guns, but I've done it.

I think I read in a gunsmithing book by M. L. "Mic" McPherson (?) that on Marlins, the easy way to correct headspace issues is to fit new locking blocks.... but whether those are available, dunno. The Marlin name has been bought and sold several times since the book was printed. Rebarreling could end up costing about what a replacement gun would. Square threads, and a myriad of dovetail slots make it a little more of a job than screwing a new barrel on a gun with a headspace nut (Savage and others). So, it's probably worth a little trouble to see if you can find another solution.

Good luck, keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
Any time I buy a marlin 336 lever gun used I always open and close the lever gently with the muzzle pointed up..leave the hammer back to see what it fells like. . Place your thumb on the back of the bolt and gently push forward. . If it's lose and moves forward more than 1/16 of an inch I'll take a little off the lever at the point where it makes contact with the lower plate.. just behind the trigger that will allow the lever to push the locking lug upward Into the lock position on the bolt .. I've used this trick many times and it's never failed. . But please let a competent gun smith do this procedure for you .. one rifle I worked had to have a little meterial taken off of the lock at the point where it made contact with the firing pin .. sometimes it will put to much pressure on the firing pin and bind it up
Gesture Finger Thumb Material property Nail
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
"Locking in by crushing it" is stretching your action!! You check headspace by hand, not by lever.

If you've tried neck sizing only, those rounds had NO excess headspace. Did they fire ok?

For the record, here's how to check headspace in a Marlin:
Take off the buttstock and removed the bottom tang with lever, trigger, hammer and mainspring.

Leave in the bolt and locking block.
Clean the rim area of the chamber and hold the barrel and mag tube in a vise so the action is bottom side up.
Remove the locking block and clean both faces.
Put the GO gauge under the extractor and push the bolt forward so the gauge is chambered.
Drop in the locking block and carefully push it into the locked position so the bolt halves line up.
Push forward on the rear of the bolt and estimate how far it moves before it stops.

To gauge how much excess headspace you have--- Add layers of common masking tape (.003 thick) to the rear of the GO gauge until the locking block feels the bolt when it's pushed home while the bolt is pushed forward. The number of tape layers times .003 is excess. It is VERY common for Marlin 336 type round bolt Marlins to have .015 excess HS and be perfectly safe to shoot. They're woods deer rifles and ammo from a hunting coat pocket many times needs some 'slop' to made it reliable. Shooter's needs drives the market and bench resting Marlins is a brand new thing!
 
  • Like
Reactions: William Iorg

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
The main spring was replaced with a new one, plus a washer or two. The firing pin protrusion looked good using measurements. The same reloading dies were used for a M94 with no problems (full length sized)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
17,052 Posts
Trying to help here, but without answers to good questions its just wasted time.
WHAT is your problem?
Does the firing pin contact the primer at all?
How does the firing pin mark differ on a dud than on a fired case?
Has the gun ever been altered in any way?

WHAT gauge was used in checking HS?
Was an actual measurement done?
How often the fail to fire?

The two-piece firing pin of the 336 acts as a dis-connector and prevents the gun from firing unless the bolt is totally closed. The last 1/16 or so is spring-loaded so the lever must be held closed which is not good bench technique, but the gun is not a benchrest contender, either.
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
38,172 Posts
A neck-sized case CANNOT have "excess headspace." I think you have another problem to solve.

Get pics of 'fired' vs 'did not fire' primers, that might be instructive. Do any of them fire if you cock the hammer again?

Do you have a hammer extension on the gun? If so, take it off and repeat the tests.

What is the measurement on the firing pin protrusion? "It looked good..." isn't a measurement. Need numbers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have checked all of the posts I could find, especially the ones that looked like the more promising ones.
Took it to a gunsmith 3x and said he would have to order gauges. He smoothed the parts up. But that's all he accomplished. I didn't go back.never had much luck with localsmith's anyhow
None of these fixes have worked.

As far as the firing pin protrusion, how do you measure it? All I have is calipers. Tried to find out what the front firing pin length was but never got an answer.
It is level with the bolt rim.

I get light strikes. Sometimes it will shoot on the 2nd try, sometimes not. Can't remember how many but way to many. Sometimes 5 in a row.
Except when using federal components. Went through 40 without a problem.
No hammer extension.

I don't know the brand of gauges he had. He got them when going to a 2 year school in Colorado, so probably good ones.
 
1 - 20 of 111 Posts
Top