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The Remington 750s are rated for any factory ammo made. The thing that harms semi-auto rifles is the powder burn rate. The 358 and 35 Whelen like faster powders, so you could shoot any good handload in a Remington 750 and not harm the Whelen. The 270 and 30'06 are a bigger worry for 750 handloaders than the Whelen. They like slow burning powders, and that kind of powder wrecks gasport systems in a hurry. If you want a serious critter thumper, then the Whelen in a Remington 750 is the why to go. I wish Remington would offer a 358 in the 750, I'd buy one tomorrow.
Amen on the 358Win chambered in a Rem 750:)
 

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The 35 Whelen can be loaded so close to the 350 Remington Magnum that to argue any difference is mainly a waste of time.

The 338 Federal seems a good round and I would guess it is loaded to a higher velocity than one can load the 358 Winchester. quote]
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Respectfully disagree on both points. I can load my 350 Rem mag considerably higher than my 35 Whelen in 200 and 225 grain bullets. The 250's go to the Whelen. The 350 rem mag is limited in the Rem rifles to a short COAL, so the longer, heavier bullets have to be deep seated and displace too much powder. The Ruger 77's chambered in 350 Rem mag allow the bullets to be seated out further and I would expect to get better velocities for the 350 Rem mag at all bullet weights in those rifles. ALso...TAC powder has really upped the performance of the 350 Rem mag.

I haven't tried TAC yet in my 35 Whelen, so maybe I'll disprove my own point.

And Barsness has pointed out that the 358 can achieve equal or better velocities than the 338 fed. The 358 has not been loaded by the factories to its true potential due to the older leverguns chambered for it. The 338 Fed started out as a bolt gun cartridge and was loaded to higher pressures by the factory. Because the 358 has a larger diameter, it's velocity at any pressure is higher than the 338 fed for a given weight.

Of course the 358 scrubs off velocity faster than the 338 after it leaves the muzzle due to that larger diameter. When bullet meets hide, it really doesn't matter.
 

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The 9.3mm is a fine round except for those who would like to fire a lighter bullet at higher velocity, then the American version, the .35 Whelen has more to offer.
9.3 is a better round in every way to the 35 whelen sorry to say. Bigger bullets going faster. Nothing against the 35 Whelen but give a 9.3x62 a try you will fall in love instantly!
 

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Well, since this whole long topic has been about splitting very thin hairs, I have to say no, that is not true. The lightest bullet I find for the 9.3mm is 232 grains and the highest velocity for that is about 2650 fps. The .35 Whelen can run a 180 grain bullet nearly 3100 fps, a 200 grain past 2800 fps and 225 grains to 2700 fps. So I stand by my original statement that the 9.3x62 exceeds the .35 Whelen only with bullets of 250 grains or more, with lighter bullets the Whelen bests it by a considerable margin simply because of a much greater variety of bullets and loads available. Not to mention the variety of rifles available.
 

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A search for articles about the .358 win found this thread for me and I had to join the site to ask a few questions.

1) Those that shoot the .358 win, do you have multiple .35s in you armory? ie. .35 rem and .350 rem mag, .35 whelen, .350 norma mag, etc?
I have the .35 cal bug, owning a .35 rem, .350 Rem Mag and the latest is Ruger's .358 Win Frontier rifle. Now I've been thinking a re-barreled 30-30 to .356? or go big with a .348 win...

2) I've begun loading with IMR 4895 and 4320. I think the 4895 is shooting better, but I'm so new to reloading that I'm not really sure how to decide what to use. Do you just pick one? Without a chrono and a lot of bench time, I'm at a loss. I just read about TAC powder being very impressive in the .350 RM, any users with the .358 Win?

3) would anyone share a few recipes with me for the .358 win?

Thanks to all who have contributed to this thread and the site. I have a lot of reading to do!!

Alek
 

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Well my first introduction to 358 range was the adoption of a M1905 Mannlicher/Schoenauer Carbine w/ set triggers I got in 81. Very accurate little rifle but I can't see the sights on the short barrel and longer. Guess I need to find it a good home.

Next adoption I found was a Marlin 35 Rem at a flea market a couple years back and with a scope and see through base I am in the game. I built it as a car gun primarily.
Next I wanted to get into a quiet rifle and my friend Ed Harris is responsible for this excursion and I also wanted to see what lead bullets could do at long range.
Thusly I got reamers for 358 Win and 35 Whelen. So far I have only built the 358 Win with Palma Medium Weight Pacnor barrel in 16 twist as the increased propellant capacity of 35 Whelen is a waste as I doubt this rifle will see that much high velocity applications.
I just ordered a double cav mould from Hoch based on Ed's 282 gr. GC he designed but with a little difference. A friend on another forum sent me some samples of Ed's bullet in base pour but both were too long for 16 twist but Ed's design had something very unique which is about .200" of bore ride. As it turns out my Pacnor needs .352" bore ride to contact top of lands and Ed's design fit it perfectly with a .352 bore ride so I speced it at .352-.353 in the bore ride area. I ordered two different meplat sizes, .140" and .200" thinking I might see some better accuracy in one over the other at long range (600 yds+). I tend to be a maverick when it comes to highpower and if I can get this thing to run I am not above showing up at a high power match and giving the boys a show.
Guess it will be January before I can look for it to arrive.

What I like about this bore size is the vast array of bullets that are available. For instance in the 35 Remington, it is still affordable to load using 180gr. Sierra pistol bullets. Seated to right length it feeds just fine sitting on top of 38 gr. 4895.
Thusly in the 358 Win on my Mod 70 action I can load everything from 125 gr. to maybe 270 to 280 grain bullets.
Brass is available in abundance for fire forming so with plenty of brass and plenty of bullet choices there range of application is pretty wide.
 

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I'll admit to being a 35 cal looney. Started w/ an old 9 x 57 Mauser 93, then rechambered a Marlin 336 30-30AI to 356 Win. After that I bought a new 350 Rem mag at a closeout sale and I've used it for elk hunting the past 3 years.

I also have a couple 35 Whelens that I have not gotten around to working up loads for. ONe I've decided to keep unfired for one of my sons and the other is a sporterized Mauser 98 with an Adams and Bennett Barrel. The 22", 350 Rem mag is so totable and gives such great preformance, I haven't seen the need to use the 35 WHelen much for hunting. I carried it on one hunt, but the old Mauser is a bit heavy for hill country packing.

Then I rechambered an old Remington 760 to 358 Win, and picked up a closeout Ruger Frontier in 358 Win a few months ago. Love that Frontier w/ either a scout scope or a Millet Red dot.

I've bounced around developing loads for these rifles, but have not actually perfected loads for any. Closest in my 350 Rem mag elk load using TAC powder and a 225 gr Barnes TSX bullet. It's plenty fast, but needs tuning for accuracy. The TAC load replaced a BLC2 load I had put together as TAC gives a real velocity bump to this cartridge.

I have a pretty good load for the 358 Win Frontier using Ramshot's X-Terminator. That powder seems to give nearly as high velocities from the short barrel as TAC, without having to worry about a compressed load or high pressure. I use a 200 gr TSX in that load, but may try a conventional bullet or Accubond for next season.

I couldn't hunt this season due to an injury, and load development was also been curtailed.

In some respects, it doesn't matter what load I use as I haven't pulled the trigger on an elk for many years. Just wish the bears, cougars and wolves would leave a few more of them for us hunters.
 

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I suppose I'm something of a medium bore nut too. I bought my first medium a rare 336ER in .356 over twenty years ago and have also aquired a BLR in .358, a Hawkeye in .358, 3 different .35 Whelens, a 673 in .350 and an old 760 in .35. I also have a Hawkeye in .338F and had a Sav 110 rebarreled to
.338/06. Of the 18 or so calibers I've killed deer with, none has ever been better than the .35W. It's simply lights out on deer-sized game. I sold my 7400 in .35W, hoping to get the new 750 Carbine in .35W. Still hoping.....lol. The nicest rifle of the bunch to carry is that Marlin .356, followed closely by the BLR in .358. If I could only have one....the BLR. Mediums can be darn addictive.
 
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Meant to add that I'll send 358 load info to anyone who sends me their e-mail. It's too big a file to send by PM.

Promise I won't give your e-mail address to anyone but my crazy brother in law who may write you when he's loaded and needing a friendly chat.
 

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My 2 Cents...

In terms of TKO values, the .358 Win is close to the .338 Win Mag, but we all know in real world terms, it's not even a comparison.


.325 WSM 220gr @ 2650 = 26.90
.338 Federal 225gr @ 2425 = 26.5
.338 Win Mag 225gr @ 2882 = 31.31
.338 Win Mag 250gr @ 2780 = 33.56
.338 Win Mag 300gr @ 2426 = 35.14
.358 Win........225gr @ 2528 = 29.09
.358 Win .......250gr @ 2284 = 29.20
Couldn't pass up the oportunity to add to a 3 year old thread.

The .358 does have a decent TKO value, and should produce those numbers with a shorter barrel than the .338 federal, all things being equal. TKO makes sense because it gives greater emphasis to bullet weight and frontal area, two factor that are constant in terminal ballistics (cf. John Linebaugh). Not a perfect index, but useful.

of course, capacity of the .358 doesn't reach 70 grains. But hey, nothings perfect.
 

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I suppose I'm something of a medium bore nut too. I bought my first medium a rare 336ER in .356 over twenty years ago and have also aquired a BLR in .358, a Hawkeye in .358, 3 different .35 Whelens, a 673 in .350 and an old 760 in .35. I also have a Hawkeye in .338F and had a Sav 110 rebarreled to
.338/06. Of the 18 or so calibers I've killed deer with, none has ever been better than the .35W. It's simply lights out on deer-sized game. I sold my 7400 in .35W, hoping to get the new 750 Carbine in .35W. Still hoping.....lol. The nicest rifle of the bunch to carry is that Marlin .356, followed closely by the BLR in .358. If I could only have one....the BLR. Mediums can be darn addictive.
I've had 3 different 358s over the years. My current is my favorite. A rechambered 760 that has been carbinated.

I still have a 7600 in 35 whelen and used to own a 94AE in 356. Never warmed up to that gun. When Marlin introduced their 336ER, I couldn't afford one. I still can't!:eek:
 

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Nope. No BT's either. So the two best bullets, in my opinion, aren't made for .358. That sucks...I wouldn't pick a Partition for deer hunting at those velocities, tho' might be great for elk...
My cousin's husband loaded the Hornady 200 grain Flextips in his 350 Remington Magnum and they worked fine. Killed his big 6pt stone dead and didn't blow the bullet up at 100yds.
 

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A search for articles about the .358 win found this thread for me and I had to join the site to ask a few questions.

1) Those that shoot the .358 win, do you have multiple .35s in you armory? ie. .35 rem and .350 rem mag, .35 whelen, .350 norma mag, etc?
I have the .35 cal bug, owning a .35 rem, .350 Rem Mag and the latest is Ruger's .358 Win Frontier rifle. Now I've been thinking a re-barreled 30-30 to .356? or go big with a .348 win...

2) I've begun loading with IMR 4895 and 4320. I think the 4895 is shooting better, but I'm so new to reloading that I'm not really sure how to decide what to use. Do you just pick one? Without a chrono and a lot of bench time, I'm at a loss. I just read about TAC powder being very impressive in the .350 RM, any users with the .358 Win?

3) would anyone share a few recipes with me for the .358 win?

Thanks to all who have contributed to this thread and the site. I have a lot of reading to do!!

Alek
I only load 2 bullet weights for my Savage 99 in 358.

These are MAX LOADS so back off a few grains before getting to this point.

48grains of IMR3031, CCI 200, R-P 308 cases, 200 grain Hornady RN. 2466FPS @26 degrees

46 grains of IMR4064, CCI 200, winchester super-x 308 cases, 250 grain Speer SP, 2223 fps @26 degrees.
 

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Picked up an awesome deal on a brand new Sako Greywolf (stainless steel with green and gray laminated stock), in .338 Federal, fine lookin' rifle worth $1250.00 normally but because Sako was discontinuing the chambering, EuroOptic has the whole inventory of .338 Fed. on sale for $725.00 + shipping on Gunbroker.com. Couldn't pass this one up, mounted my Ziess 3.5x10x44mm Conquest on top, one fine rig !
 

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If Hornady would load the 358 Win with their mystery powder and use the flextips or maybe the new GMX I think it would easily match or best the 338 Fed. on paper. What does that do for the paper arguments? The 350 Rem Mag looks cooler to me.

AL
 

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Picked up an awesome deal on a brand new Sako Greywolf (stainless steel with green and gray laminated stock), in .338 Federal, fine lookin' rifle worth $1250.00 normally but because Sako was discontinuing the chambering, EuroOptic has the whole inventory of .338 Fed. on sale for $725.00 + shipping on Gunbroker.com. Couldn't pass this one up, mounted my Ziess 3.5x10x44mm Conquest on top, one fine rig !
Great deal! I see they've bumped the price up to $800 now.
 

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Picked up an awesome deal on a brand new Sako Greywolf (stainless steel with green and gray laminated stock), in .338 Federal, fine lookin' rifle worth $1250.00 normally but because Sako was discontinuing the chambering, EuroOptic has the whole inventory of .338 Fed. on sale for $725.00 + shipping on Gunbroker.com. Couldn't pass this one up, mounted my Ziess 3.5x10x44mm Conquest on top, one fine rig !

Great choice in scopes. I love mine.
 

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338 Federal vs 358 Winchester

Why use a .358 Win when there are so many other choices ? I mean I understand if you already have it, but if you are buying a new gun, why bother ? Why not just use a .338 Win/RUM/WBY or a .375 Ruger/H&H/WBY. Then again if you are after big and slow, why not use a .45-70 or .450 Marlin ? Im asking out of curiousity, not to stir up a big debate.
We can use the comparison of a bartender having hundereds of different recipes to mix up a concoction that will all acheive the same goal, but only a few will appeal to your taste buds. Some maybe smooth, sweet, sour, or bitter. Each individual needs to determine what their preferrence is. Ammunition manufacturers have reinvented the wheel many times over. There are so many calibers out there that are balistically identicle to others out there. Some are light and shoot a fast flat bullet, others lob a heavy pill with a lot of energy a short distance, and magnums shoot a heavy bullet faster and flatter. We need to decide what works for us as an idividuall in our specific hunting environment for a specific game animal and range. This is where we as consumers need to figure out if when buying a new rifle...do we first decide which make, model, and action style that we prefer, or do we chose a caliber and see who sells a gun in that caliber?

I grew up deer hunting in Minnesota shooting several deer with 308 bolt action rifles with 150 grain bullets. All of my shots on deer were under 50 yards while hunting in the woods. Most deer dropped within 20 yards of getting shot. 100 yard shots never present themselves in this area, and light flat shooting calibers aren't needed. This is when I decided to buy a brush gun. I purchased a Marlin 444 lever action that dropped a fork horn at 75 yards in its tracks. I enjoyed the big boomers, and always had big dreams of hunting bear and moose with it. I bought a couple 375 H&H rifles thinking that some day I would take them to Alaska to shoot big critters like bear or moose. I later decided to sell my 444 Marlin and 375 H&Hs and buy a 7mm-08 Ruger 77MKll RSI for deer and another caliber for bear / moose. This is when I bought a Ruger 77Mkll in 350 Remington Mag. I thoroughly enjoy this rifle. I mounted a Hogue overmolded stock on it and reloaded some discontinued 250 grain Winchester silver tips and 250 Hornady RN at 2500 fps. This is my bear gun. Although this fall I was sitting in a tree stand when a 225 lb black bear came into the bait pile 20 yards away. I felt that the rifle was overkill, so I used my 41 mag revolver with a sucessful kill shot. About a year after buying my 350 Remington Mag I reallized that Ruger discontinued the 350 Rem Mag "original short magnum" and they came out with a 338RCM which is very similar ballistics to the 350. I guess it is a marketing ploy to stir up new business since the 350 Rem mag isn't selling off of the shelves. I really like the 350 which is a short action belted magnum which is ballistically similar to the 35 Whelen and 150-200 FPS shy of a 338 Win Mag.

Sometimes I think that it would be nice to get rid of the 7mm-08 and 350 Rem Mag and get something in between the two. I really like the greater cross sectional area of the 35 caliber. That is the whole idea right? Make a bigger whole to deflate the lungs and create a better blood trail if needed. The two medium bore rifles that appeal to me is the 6-1/2 pound Browning BLR chambered in the 358 Winchester and the 5 pound Kimber Montana chambered in 338 Federal. I feel that either one of these wood do a great job on any criitter, deer, bear, caribou, elk, or moose within 200 yards. I have never shot either of the 338 Federal or the 358 Win. I am curious how much recoil the lightweight Kimber would rap a guy. Although, I really like the idea of a 5 pound 2 ounce rifle.

Also, I do most of of my reloading with Hodgdon H4895, but once it is used up I will be switching to Ramshot powder. It is very fine and easier to meter than Hodgdon. Ramshot also has great customer service and has answered some reloading questions for me. They have given me some reloading data via phone and e-mail that was not published in their manual for the 350 Rem Mag. Their powder can produce another 100 FPS more than the Hodgdon podwer that I am using.:D

This is just my 4 cents worth.
Thanks for reading my input!
 

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358Win - 225gr Nosler Accubond, 225gr Sierra G/K moving 2578fps using TAC with 215Fed primers. I would take the 358Win over the 338Fed any day. 225gr Sierra 2450-2490fps


Three shot group 225gr Sierra




Three shot group 225gr Nosler Accubond




Accubond is a killer in the 358Win

 
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