Shooters Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I'm new to the forum and reloading and had a question about reloading .338 win mag.
I have a RCBS 2 die set and deprimed and resized a couple of cases. I noticed the neck diameter chg from .370 to .360 and the case length grew .015".
I checked SAAMI spec and it calls for a .370" dia neck.
When resizing, is it supposed to drop down to .360"?
Please bare with me.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,606 Posts
Welcome native. When you resize, the die is going reduce outside diameter of the neck down to a diameter that when you do actually seat a bullet in the case, it will provide some neck tension on the bullet, and the bullet will expand the neck back out, probably to something close to 0.370". This end result is dependent upon how thick the neck brass is, and all cases will be different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Shawn. Thanks for the quick response. I am only using Remington brass so hopefully they will be fairly consistent.
Since the case grew to 2.510 after resizing and spec calls out for a max of 2.500 I guess I will need to trim them down to something under 2.500. I read where that dimension has a tolerance of +0 / -.020".
Thanks again!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,606 Posts
Native, for hunting rounds, I don't think there are any downsides to trimming cases to SAAMI specs. Each rifle chamber will tolerate a different case length, and being short is a lot better than long and jamming the neck into the end of your chamber, gripping the bullet, and raising pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,524 Posts
Native,

Welcome to the forum.

I have sent you a "P.M" (Personal Mail).

Give me a shout if your interested in the item discussed.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
703 Posts
One bit of advice I can give you, don't push the shoulders back too much. Set your FL die to only bump the shoulder, set the die so it is 1 full turn AWAY from the shell holder, size a case as you normally would, clean off any lube, try to chamber in your gun, if the bolt is difficult to close, turn die IN 1/4 turn and repeat above steps until the bolt just closes with a little tension on it. Oh, if your rifle allows easy bolt disassembly, do this with the firing pin assembly removed. You will have a getter feel of the resistence on the bolt this way.

Cheers.
:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,524 Posts
I'll even go a bit farther then Mag. Maniac by saying, -------------------------------

With bottle neck brass, always size brass fried in YOUR chamber and sized in YOUR dies, the minimum amount that will allow that brass to again smoothly re-chamber in YOUR chamber.

As M.M. indicates, a "slight" crush fit is not a bad thing.

I discuss proper adjustment of full length sizing dies and why the instructions supplied by some manufactures is less then correct, in a document I'll gladly send to anyone who sends me a P.M. requesting it. Also include your personal "E" address.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,581 Posts
The 338 Winchester Mag is the next to last forming operati0on before forming wildcat cases. Not particular, before forming the cases used could be 8mm Remington Mags, 300 Weatherby or 300 Winchester Mags with a few 300 H&H thrown.

Advantage, a case that is too long from the shoulder of the case to the head of the case can be formed to fit the chamber, another problem, the shoulder of the parent case does not move, it is erased, the shoulder of the parent case becomes part of the neck and part of the case body becomes part of the shoulder. No matter how it is explained the shoulder does not move .002" or .200", the new shoulder is formed from other parts of the case and did not exist before forming started.

Case forming allow me to off set the length of the chamber, then there is bump, I have bump presses, I have not managed to bump the shoulder, no matter the configuration, when my die hits the shoulder it has made contact with the case body and case neck, I have non-bum dies.

Back to my bump presses, I also have presses that do not bump.

F. Guffey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I want to think everybody for their advice. It really helps to get some knowledge from your experience.

One last question. I am using Remington brass, RL-19 powder with Hornady .225 SST bullets.
I've read a lot of different discussions on primer selection. Some saying you do not want to use large mag primers and stick with standard and vice versa.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

BTW, I'm just a long range hog hunter from Texas. (Probably nothing more than 500 yds)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,606 Posts
Native, Hornady load recipes (fifth edition) for the 338 WM use WLRM primers (large mag rifle primers). This doesn't mean that you can't use std primers, like CCI 200 or similar, but you just need to work up a load and see how they behave.

I always use CCI 250 primers in my 338 WM loads, because that's what my Speer manual listed and I developed loads with them, and had no reason to look further. In Texas, with moderate temps (no extreme cold), I doubt you would run into problems with std primers, if that's all you have on hand to work with. If getting mag primers is not an issue, then I would stick with the published loads/components.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks Shawn. The local places only have the std primers, but I can always make the trip to Cabelas or Bass Pro around an hour drive. Sounds like I need to get my hands on the Hornady load recipes manual. :)
Thanks again for all of your help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
703 Posts
A good rule of thumb when loading magnum cases is to use magnum primers, there are reasons for this, as there are that a standard primer will work, but not under ALL circumstances.
If you keep to magnum primers in magnum cases and standard primers in non magnum cases, you should never run into problems.
There is a caveat to all of this, if hunting in minus temps with ball powders, a magnum primer is desirable in ALL types of cases.

Hope this helps.

Cheers.
:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
Keeping brass trimmed to within SAAMI spec is elemental, very important. As already stressed, pressures are the focus here, and they can spike excessively if the moth gets pinched in the throat. Generally, .010" is the rule of thumb. So if maximum SAAMI case length is 2.500" then trim too length should be 2.490".

The moth will always be smaller than the projectile. But neck and general brass thickness varies, so if you want all of your necks to be consistent you'll need to start turning case necks to accomplish this. If you turn, a good amount to take off would be .00125". Also annealing, other wise you'll start losing cases to split necks early on.

Submoa
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,268 Posts
As M.M. indicates, a "slight" crush fit is not a bad thing.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
One note about this: While I agree that a slight crush fit is not a bad thing, it's important to know that, especially in these cases, that the normal manufacturers recommended lubricant for the bolt locking lugs (usually a light oil) may be insufficient and could lead to galling of the lugs.

A grease with good lubricity and high load capacity is preferred. I like a good moly grease but have used nickel anti-seize.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top