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Getting a 40-70 straight sharps.Need to work up a load.Wish to shoot targets.Which bullet style is best? Why? Which brass is best? Why? Which powder is best? Why?
 

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Michael,
You don't give a lot of detail, firstly what make of rifle, barrel dims, twist etc. If in an original rifle then the bore may be .403 while later makes are .408.
To generalise, I have a 40/65 with 32" barrel 1 in 16" twist. I am loading a 420gn Lyman .408 "Snover" that is shot unsized and lubed by hand. The finished size as cast is .4096. For powder I use 58gn Swiss FFG in Rem 45/70 cases that have been resized and a standard Win LR primer.
Depending on your chamber dimensions, the head on Rem measures .498" while Win are .503". My rifle will load the Win but they are very tight.
Case preparation is nothing more than unifying the primer pockets and heavely bevelling the flash hole then trimming to length of 2.10".
 

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Eric,
The rifle is being made at present.It is a 40-70 straight sharps caliber.Being made in Big Timber,Montana,U.S.A. The barrel is to be 30". I allready have one of thier rifles and have learned that they are very consistant in their work.So..what ever is their standard will be the bore dimentions.I realy did not think the bore dim.would matter in picking a bullet style,I have a lot to learn.
 

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My two rifles are Pedersoli Sharps "Shilouette" models, the other is a 45/70.
I am very fastedious soul and weigh each projectile on a dillion electronic scale to 418.2gr +.1,-0.0. I weigh each powder charge also.
Loading is dump powder then touch each one on the case vibrator to settle in the case, bees wax wad, grease cookie (1.6mm), card wad stamped from milk carton, lubed projectile seated to just touch the lands.
The best group shot to date with this combo was 31.2mm with 8 into 22mm at 100 meters. This was a 10 shot group.
200m groups are around 63-70mm. That is about as good as my 50+ eyes can do these days with peep sights
 

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I see that this is an old thread, but I am going to revive it, as I have a Remington rolling block in 40-70 Sharps Straight. I am looking for info on casings and possible loads to make this this beauty shoot once again.
As I am a bullet caster for most of my other rifles, I will have to slug the bore and see what I am working with, etc. Should be an interesting project.
regards
Bestboss
 

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Mike, you might want to get the fastest twist available for your 40-70 so that you can shoot the heaviest bullet especially if intersted in shootng BPCR silouette and maybe long range.

I have a custom 1885 Browning Hi Wall with a 1 X 13" SSTL Lija barrel in 40-72 (405 Win smokless) for shooting BPCR silouette and long range,

Using a 436 grain Dan Theodore designed bullet in a paul jones custom mold.


Go with the fastest twist barrel available.

Semper Fi
 

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Michael said:
Getting a 40-70 straight sharps.Need to work up a load.Wish to shoot targets.Which bullet style is best? Why? Which brass is best? Why? Which powder is best? Why?
Michael: Don't get confused here by some of these posts. The 40-70 does NOT use necked down 45-70 brass like the 40-65. The 40-70 uses generally reformed 30-40 Krag brass. There are several choises available from Buffalo Arms, but you need to know exactly what the application will be. As for Big Timber there are two gun manufactures there, Shiloh or C. Sharps. They are not the same either, so you best contact whoever is making the rifle and especially ask about the brass questions.........best regards Iowa
 

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Great advice, Iowa.

Michael, the C. Sharps folks are very easy to talk to about any questions/concerns you might have.
SPG offers a lot of information.
 

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Many find it harder to achieve really good accuracy with cast bullets which have a pointed nose. They might be advisable if you plan really long range shooting, since they will reduce bullet drop, and inconsistencies in a small bullet drop are less than inconsistencies in a large one.

Flat nosed bullets only have two advantages. They are safe in tube magazines, and by some processes they are easier to make moulds for. Neither of these need concern you. The semi-pointed bullet in that Buffalo Arms picture, with bullet length to suit your rifling twist, is probably ideal. Don't worry about the effect of bullet shape on stopping power, if there is a chance you will sometimes hunt with this rifle. A piece of aluminium foil sandwiched in the mould for the first quarter inch or so of the bullet's tip will do the needful.
 
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