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What type of firearm are you shooting that in? I only shoot .44 mag in a single action revolver and I never was concerned with OAL. I simply run the bullet out to where it is really close to the end of the cylinder and have never had a problem. If it is for a rifle, I'd run the bullet out far enough to feed through the action. I doubt that you will run the bullet out so far that it touches the lands.
 

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Hornady lists far more 2400 with their 300gr Jacketed bullet at 1.600". Same for the data for Speer and Nosler with their 300gr bullets. It's pretty unlikely 14gr with the BTB 300gr bullet will be a problem.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Off the top of my head I'd guess that 18-19 grains is maximum Lyman's 50th for 2400 and 300 grain cast bullets. Alliant says 19 grains is max.

BUT don't take my word for it. 18 grains is plenty stout with a 300 grain bullet.

RJ

Loads listed in this post should be used at your own n risk. Start low and work up
 
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All great advice, above,... I am in lock step with Blackhawk355, I like the metplat just about even with the end of the cylinder chamber. The least amount of distance to the forcing cone, the better, in my opinion. I do heavy crimp these, when loading with healthy powder charges and heavy boolits.
 
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The only caveat is seating depth. The lead bullet has lube grooves, so if that makes it longer below the crimp groove, it will seat deeper, and that raises pressure. Unfortunately, BTB's site's View Details database is broken so you can't bring up the bullet details any longer. The Hornady bullet, seated into a 1.285" long case with a COL of 1.600", has 0.525" seating depth into the case.

In this case, for calculation purposes, measure the length of the BT bullet (they make 300 grains in WFN and LMN DCG, so I don't know what you mean by LFC?) to compare to that 0.525" number, use:

Seating Depth = 1.285" + bullet length - 1.600"

QuickLOAD suggests a tenth of an inch deeper seating would raise pressure about 37%. This is not a linear thing, so actual numbers are needed. At 14 grains, with a lead bullet, that looks like it is still under the line, pressure-wise. The Hornady maximum load would not be.

Edit:
If you have the LMN DCG, the two crimp grooves would let you choose the longer cartridge length, so I am guessing you are talking about the WFN. That one is stubby enough that its seating depth should be the same or slightly shorter than the Hornady, using its crimp groove, so that would make it OK to go with your charge.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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The picture looks like a WFN to me.
 

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Yep. I forgot the photo was up there. So my last tail end comment should be correct and seating depth difference won't be an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The only caveat is seating depth. The lead bullet has lube grooves, so if that makes it longer below the crimp groove, it will seat deeper, and that raises pressure. Unfortunately, BTB's site's View Details database is broken so you can't bring up the bullet details any longer. The Hornady bullet, seated into a 1.285" long case with a COL of 1.600", has 0.525" seating depth into the case.

In this case, for calculation purposes, measure the length of the BT bullet (they make 300 grains in WFN and LMN DCG, so I don't know what you mean by LFC?) to compare to that 0.525" number, use:

Seating Depth = 1.285" + bullet length - 1.600"

QuickLOAD suggests a tenth of an inch deeper seating would raise pressure about 37%. This is not a linear thing, so actual numbers are needed. At 14 grains, with a lead bullet, that looks like it is still under the line, pressure-wise. The Hornady maximum load would not be.

Edit:
If you have the LMN DCG, the two crimp grooves would let you choose the longer cartridge length, so I am guessing you are talking about the WFN. That one is stubby enough that its seating depth should be the same or slightly shorter than the Hornady, using its crimp groove, so that would make it OK to go with your charge.
No the ltf is the crimp I use Lee factory crimp. The bullet I'm using is the WFN
 

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Lots of good info here.

If you want more try the bullet maker and see what they recommend, probably wont.
Sierra BULLETSMITHS (an 800 number)will recommend for and reloading question. Dont have to be Sierra.

Could also check w/ powder maker and see what they suggest.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah I have to call Marshel for recipes on the pile drivers I bought but lost the paper!
 

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Ruger black hawk
The Blackhawk has a longer cylinder than many others. Standard max OAL for the .44 Mag and .45 Colt is 1.6" since that was the original length of the SAA cylinder. You can load heavier bullets out on the Ruger, but make sure you have a solid crimp or it will walk on you and lock up the cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The Blackhawk has a longer cylinder than many others. Standard max OAL for the .44 Mag and .45 Colt is 1.6" since that was the original length of the SAA cylinder. You can load heavier bullets out on the Ruger, but make sure you have a solid crimp or it will walk on you and lock up the cylinder.
All the 44 ammo have a good crimp around the bullet.
 

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The longer cylinder is to accommodate bullets seated to use crimp grooves meant for the 44 Special, which has 0.005" greater COL, but a 0.125" shorter case. Using the 44 Special crimp groove in the 44 Mag case gives you 1.740" COL, with the usual tolerances. This arrangement lets you use a larger powder charge. Some bullets have two crimp grooves for this reason; one 0.325" below the tip for 44 Mag, and one 0.455" below the tip for 44 Special. These bullets let you use either COL in the 44 Mag, assuming your cylinder length will accommodate it.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Did you slug the barrel, and what size bullets did you order? The Lee Factory Carbide Crimp die may cause more problems than it solves, with bullets larger than the usual jacketed size.

There is also the Lee Factory Crimp die (note the absence of the word "carbide") which does not cause problems with oversized cast bullets, and in fact is usually beneficial with cast bullets.

You'll have to test and see in your gun of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
No I never slug the barrel but I never had any problems with the 44mag. When shooting the crimp is a nice heavy ring around the bullet,I used 300 cast and 240 cast.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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And what bullet diameter(s) are you using with cast?
 
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