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Discussion Starter #1
I bought a .444 Marlin and want to start reloading for it. I have a RCBS Rockchucker that I bought about 18 years ago and never did anything with. So now I am going to.
Do they make a carbide reloading die set for the .444? I have been on Midway and didn't see one.
From what I have read, I want the Lee factory crimp die also.

Thanks, Leinieman
 

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Lee makes dies for the .444, but they are NOT carbide, they are standard carbon steel dies. I don;t know if you'd need carbide sizing dies unless you're loading hundreds and hundreds at a time, as in pistol cartridges.

Here they are at the Lee Factory Sales site. It includes the full-length sizer, bullet seater, and factory crimp (FCD).
http://factorysales.com/html/xcart/cart.php

You can also get them from Kempf, or Cabelas, or Midway (they can order them for you).

They cost a dollar more from Kempf, but the description of the set is better at this site:
https://kempfgunshop.com//index.php...facturer_id=0&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=41
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info. I think I might go ahead and order the whole kit for 178.00 and sell my Rockchucker. That way I will have the turret plate and not have to change the dies out everytime I have to change steps. Do you think that is a wise thing to do?

Thanks Lienieman
 

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You don't mention what Lee Kit you're looking at, but if it's a turret then there are 2 - the Lee Turret and the Lee Classic Cast Turret. The Classic Cast line from Lee is more heavy duty...more solid. I own a Classic Clast single stage and I could not be more pleased with its construction and operation.

I don;t know the Rockchuker as I haven;t owned one, but I do know it will cost you more getting the Kit than just the dies. If you're happy with the RCBS, then I would just get dies. They'll work fine in your Rockchucker. Of course, being a Lee advocate, it's always tempting to say "Yeah. Get the Lee Kit", but that wouldn;t be right.
 

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I've used most of the reloading presses on the market and choosing between the Lee Classic Cast and the Rockchucker is like trying to decide between a Remington Model 700 or a Winchester Model 70. They're both very well-made and will absolutely do the job at hand. The Rockchucker on my bench has been reloading a wide variety of cartridges for me since the late 80's and is as solid as the day dad bought it for me.

Since you already have the press, I would just buy the dies and remaining equipment needed to reload. If you're like most reloaders, you'll eventually wind up with equipment from many different manufacturers, anyway. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Like I said I bought the RCBS press a long time ago and have never did anything with it. Is it a hassle to change the dies out everytime you change steps? Would the turret plate be easier and faster to use? Just some questions for that a newbie has.

Thanks, Leinieman
 

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Is it a hassle to change the dies out everytime you change steps?
Kinda depends on how you define "hassle". It will require unscrewing each die and screwing in its replacement (at twenty-some turns each -- which is why I love my Bonanza Co-Ax press, but that's for another thread.)

Would the turret plate be easier and faster to use?
Yes -- by a huge margin.

The Old Guy
 

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Especially when you are just getting into reloading, you do each step in the process to all of your cases, before moving on to the next step. So, if you're reloading 50 rounds of 444 Marlin, the first step would be to lube and resize them all, which uses one die. With this method of reloading, you only switch dies once, or maybe twice, during the entire process, so while it is not as easy as rotating the head on a turret, it's also not a huge waste of time. There is no "huge margin" of efficiency gained with a turret-style press, unless it's a progressive that is doing each step to one case with each pull of the handle.

If you were of a mind to process one case at a time, through each phase of reloading, instead of completing one phase at a time, on all cases, that is where a turret-style press is somewhat faster, but only by a little. Frankly, when I use the turret-style press, I get tired of rotating it back n' forth, for each process and would just as soon use a single-stage, for most jobs.

For big-boy rifle cartridges where you aren't loading hundreds at a time, the single-stage press and doing the job in batches is more logical and the best approach for someone new to the process. Even for other old guys, like me, it's still the way I do most of my bottle-neck reloading. :)
 

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Leinieman
I reload for six different calibers now, and I still reload in stages, like Broom_Jm is describing. So a single-stage press is fine for me. Even if I had a turret press, I would still reload in individual stages. The only difference then would be that, when I finished sizing a batch, instead of unscrewing the sizing die and screwing in the flaring die or the bullet seater, I would just turn the turret. Is that a time saver? Yes, but not really in the entire process. I mean, it doesn't mean anything to me, the saving of a few seconds.

That's why I said it's cheaper for you to use the RCBS and just get the dies. After you get familiar with the process, you might opt for a turret press, but if you're still loading for just one or three cartridge calibers, then probably not.
 

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I don't know if this applys to the Lee dies or not, but if you're going to load Hornady brass in 444, the RCBS seating die is to long to crimp Hornady's shorter brass. I use a 44 magnum seater dies to perform this operation on my 444 Hornady brass.
 
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