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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am reloading some .45 ACP brass and most of them are jamming on the way into the barrel. When I use factory loads in the same gun I do not get these same jams.





I am using 200gr FMJ FP with COL 1.22" on brass that's only been fired once in a Para Ordinance P14. I have an RCBS press with RCBS dies. I have cleaned, prepped, and sized the cases prior to loading also confirmed case length, deburr the inside, and chamfer the outside edge. Am I expanding the case too much before seating? Should I chamfer more of the outside edge? Should I engage more of the taper crimp in the die? I am worried about putting on too much of a crimp, wouldn't this affect chamber pressure? Or am I missing something else in the process?



While I am still a novice here I have done a fair amount of reading and looking forward to any tips or direction you can provide. I have had great success in reloading 9mm with all kinds of recipes and bullets without having any jam or firing problems....yet(knocks on wood).
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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If factory rounds work, that is your clue. Load the SAME bullet profile to the SAME overall length, and that will tell you if your loading technique is proper. Generally, if there is too much flare the rounds won't go in the chamber and you can test that by taking the barrel out and seeing if a round just drops freely into the chamber.

Once you start changing OAL or to different bullet profiles from factory ammo, then the detective work will begin. Start with a dummy at the max OAL that will fit the magazine, then make the dummy progressively shorter till it will cycle. That will be the OAL that the gun 'likes.'

Too many variables changing at once and you'll just chase your tail all day long. Change things one at a time and it gets a lot easier. Fortunately, you know factory ammo will cycle and that is a good thing, so now you don't have to second-guess the magazines, feed ramp, etc. Good luck.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Measure your relaods and compare them to factory. Every detail.

That's all I can think of as I don't see anything with the one reload that would make them jam.

Be careful crimping, tapered, factory or otherwise as the 45ACP headspaces off the case mouth.

RJ
 
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The Shadow (Moderator)
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IME, oddly enough, shorter OAL's tend to be problematic with some bullet profiles.
As does the edge from ramp-to-chamber. On a brothers Para we had to just break the "wire edge", then things got happy.
 
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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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My 1944 Colt 1911A1 doesn't like anything but hardball bullets. The semi-truncated solids or hp's just won't feed right. Best stick with fodder the gun likes. As above, a very slight flare to start the bullet and then a good taper crimp (it chambers on the case mouth).
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the great information, this is exactly the direction I needed and was certain you all would provide. I'll update this thread when I get a chance to test some new rounds.
 

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Thanks for all the great information, this is exactly the direction I needed and was certain you all would provide. I'll update this thread when I get a chance to test some new rounds.
The first thing that I reloaded for was 9mm. I had no problems setting these up and all went well. About 3 years ago, I got my first 1911 in .45acp. I had about the same problem handloads did not function but factory did. I learned that my loads were just a little too light. Bumped them up a little bit and that solved the problem. I like to take some emery cloth and polish the feed ramps on my autoloaders too.
 

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45 acp seems to be one of, if not the pickiest of cartridge I've ever worked with.

As far as what to look for, Recoil Junky pretty much nailed it. Other than bullet profile possibly being the problem, the easiest way to identify the culprit is by taking all the measurements of factory ammo and then load your's to the same identical specifications. This means matching oal, mouth diameter after seating, make sure mouths are smooth, crimp should be only enough to return the mouth to a diameter that's consistent with the body dimension immediately below the mouth, in other words, the mouth should be straight. And when belling the mouths, they should only have enough bell/flare to allow bullets to start without shaving, no more, no less. More than that and you'll distort this region more than what the taper crimp die can fix.

Since you're working with FMJ's, and considering you are trimming them, you can try a little trick I've been using for almost 3 decades with auto loading cartridges with 100% success. Chamfer the inside of the mouths enough to create a nice beve that will allow the bullets to sit up nice and straight on the mouth. Then without belling the mouth at all, set the bullet on the mouth, then just seat them. No crimp is necessary at all. There are multiple advantages to be reaped using this process. No bell necessary, no crimp necessary, neck tension is at it's maximum obtainable and more consistent than when using a crimp, which greatly reduces the possibility of experiencing bullet set back during feeding. One more advantage is that there's no chance of the mouths having any remaining lip or distortion that can arise from bell/flare and crimps. So all one has to do is adjust the seating die to produce the desired oal.

If the bullet in the factory ammo has different profile characteristics, this right here can be what's causing the problem.

SMOA
 

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As usual great advice all along. I will agree with SMOA, that the 45 ACP round can be extremely cantankerous. I found that once I found a load that mine liked, I rarely deviated from it. I had a couple of Govt. issue's that would shoot anything to a tricked up Gold Cup, that would only feed a select few handloads (factory too).

MIke's suggestion to NOT change multiple variables at once is excellent advice. You need to know which was the one causing the issue.

When I shot IPSC and Bowling Pin, there were some bullet weight and velocity requirements that added some challenges, but I am sure with the advice of the people here, you will get it figured out.

Edited: There are a number of outlets that offer sample packs of bullets that might not break the bank if you are wanting to try some different varieties. Bing is your friend.
 

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I am reloading some .45 ACP brass and most of them are jamming on the way into the barrel. When I use factory loads in the same gun I do not get these same jams.





I am using 200gr FMJ FP with COL 1.22" on brass that's only been fired once in a Para Ordinance P14. I have an RCBS press with RCBS dies. I have cleaned, prepped, and sized the cases prior to loading also confirmed case length, deburr the inside, and chamfer the outside edge. Am I expanding the case too much before seating? Should I chamfer more of the outside edge? Should I engage more of the taper crimp in the die? I am worried about putting on too much of a crimp, wouldn't this affect chamber pressure? Or am I missing something else in the process?



While I am still a novice here I have done a fair amount of reading and looking forward to any tips or direction you can provide. I have had great success in reloading 9mm with all kinds of recipes and bullets without having any jam or firing problems....yet(knocks on wood).
The bottom picture gives a clue. I used to load the old Hornady FMJ-FP 230 gr. (close to 100k of them) and seating depth was critical with them. See where the ogive starts leaning in? When properly seated, there should be no more than the thickness of a thumb nail of the straight side of the bullet showing above the rim. You need to seat yours a tad deeper. You also need a good satin smooth polished feed ramp. Your magazine follower should tip the nose of the bullet up in the mag as much as possible. Taper crimp should measure no more than .470", .469" is better at the case mouth edge.

Btw, chamfer is what you do to the inside of the case mouth, deburr is the outside. Also, be sure to seat and crimp in separate steps.
 

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That's what jumped out at me, too. The shoulder of the bullet (where the ogive departs the cylindrical bearing surface) is sticking out too far and jamming the feed.
 

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That's what jumped out at me, too. The shoulder of the bullet (where the ogive departs the cylindrical bearing surface) is sticking out too far and jamming the feed.
My first thought also , seat as unclenick advises ...the OAL should be around 1.200" +/- with that 200 gr. truncated cone bullet.
Gary
 

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I've had to seat bullets with that profile as short as 1.18". I typically put a dummy together and "plunk test" it, shortening oal .005" until it "plunks" right in there.

I had one barrel done by a fellow who specializes in honing throats in revolver cylinders, and does a reliability package on 1911 barrels that includes slightly lengthening the leade in the barrel and a recrown. I have a couple more to send him that I'll be shooting standard .45 ACP in. The ability to seat out really helps with pressure.

I can run these bullets at 1.25" in my .45 Super, but run them at 1.23" so the meplat on a loaded round clears the forward edge of the ejection port. The bullet is a 255 grain hardcast with a .375" meplat and has fed 100%. Velocity is at 1050 fps.

The bullet:

]




My .45 Super

 

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Remove the barrel from the gun and see if loaded round fits. Use your barrel as a go gage for your ammo. If it does not fit you have an issue with crimp or length in most cases. If it fits load is too light.
Also in the past I've had similar issues with the 45 and found that seating the bullet and crimping needed to be done in separate operations.
 

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Should I chamfer more of the outside edge?
NO.:)

BTW - chamfering is to remove burrs whether on the inside of the case mouth or outside. Chamfering = deburring.
 

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I agree with the above regarding seating depth. The photo brought that to my attention first.

Also, you may wish to try measuring your case mouth diameter (crimp). Some pistols may be sensitive to the amount of crimp on the case mouth.

My SR1911, for example, returns to battery without issue when the crimp is .468" plus or minus a thousanth.

Just FYI -

Bayou52
 

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NO.:)

BTW - chamfering is to remove burrs whether on the inside of the case mouth or outside. Chamfering = deburring.
Not to quibble, but to chamfer something means to put a shallow angle on the sharp edge. It is meant to facilitate the start of seating a bullet with a square base edge. It does indeed remove burrs on the inside if present, but the primary purpose to put a slight angle on the inside edge of the mouth.
 

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Increase your taper crimp. I use a separate crimping die for this purpose. I typically find issues with .45 ACP reloads if the rounds aren't sufficiently crimped, but they typically run without issue with a proper taper crimp.
 
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