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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
is this as old as 1918, or when? Next to more recent cartridge.
The crimp looks like a seating depth ring and there are three of the small dot-dents spaced equally that appear to hold the bullet in place.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I have no clue, but it's really cool

RJ
 

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Yes, REM-UMC manufactured Caliber .45 Ball M1911 made in 1918. We still have some of that ammo (newer of course) here in Afghanistan. US never changed specs on that ammo in over 100 yrs. Have a Winchester box under the tree.


CD
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Well that's pretty neat to find out!
This was in a drawer when we were moving my MIL out of her house, and into our ours.
WWWWW it was there, is anybody's guess. She and hers never owned a .45.
Cool though.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No, that's a modern .45 auto. Actually has holes for a key ring chain.
 

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I'm guessing from how deeply the modern bullet is seated, you drop your keys occasionally? ;)

The deep cannelure in the case should prevent that setback on the old cartridge. The three dimples would, too. I don't think I've noticed them before, but there were issues with brass springiness back then, with Hatcher mentioning a lot of 30-06 in which bullets were loose in the cartridges. Evidently this was before the practice gluing bullets into brass with pitch sealant was begun. For that reason, particularly in something like a Thompson sub-machinegun, the concern for setback may have higher and caused those dimples to be added. But I am just speculating and don't actually know.
 
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is this as old as 1918, or when? Next to more recent cartridge.
The crimp looks like a seating depth ring and there are three of the small dot-dents spaced equally that appear to hold the bullet in place.
The cannelure is to prevent bullet setback, and most if not all, the early production ammo had that feature. The three dents acted as a positive lock to keep the bullet in place. They tried a lot of things in those early days to make sure the ammo worked as it should. By the end of WWII, they found that neck tension when used with the black asphaltum cement was sufficient, and the cannelure had mostly disappeared.

I've shot surplus .45 ammo for just about every year from 1915 on. You can watch the changes in how it was made year to year when you can do that. Things like round head primers, steel cases, steel jacketed bullets, cannelured cases and not, different types of primer crimps, etc.
 
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