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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in the Netherlands, Europe, and for reference purposes, I just bought a box of Winchester cartridges of the .454Casull persuasion. They are 260 gn jacketed flatpoints.
For this one box of 50 cartridges, I paid 65 Euro, or US&#3660,-. This is very much the going rate here in Europe, where the Casull is still considered an exotic 'wildcat' caliber (as is the .30-30, or the .45LC. Or .444Marlin or .41Magnum, to name but a few).

How much would you pay for such a box of ammo at a retailer (regular shop, not online) in the States or Canada?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
It is a pretty steep price for a box of ammo, yes, which is why I initially thought my local retailer was pulling a fast one on me. It seems that the fault lies with the manufacturers. Perhaps they need to dedicate a production line to each caliber, and the low demand for the .454 is what makes it expensive, I don't know.

Shooting in Europe, well, the Netherlands is the size of Washington State and has 16 million people living in it. As a result almost all shooting ranges are indoors, usually 25 meter underground pistol ranges. A result of that is that some older shooters have dangerously high lead pollution in their blood, from years of shooting in poorly ventilated basements. Ventilation is now regulated by law, so it's no longer much of a problem, but to this day firing unjacketed bullets is much frowned upon and not appreciated at all. For most shooters, the weekly visit to the range is a social gathering, and most ranges have a convenient bar above ground. IPSC Action shooting is quite popular and fiercely competetive. Cowboy style wild west events are rare, as these are summertime outdoor events. Hunting is less rare, but strictly regulated, usually rabbits, but sometimes our version of big game; boar or deer. It is also very elitist; you'll soon find yourself rubbing elbows with the royal family if you hunt 'big game' here in Holland <!--emo&;)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=';)'><!--endemo-->  In Germany, France and Italy hunting is more common. In Great Brittain it's usually partridges, or quail.

As for availability, 9mm and .357Mag are the norm, although Italy prohibits the use of military calibers for civilians, so 9x21 is the usual choice of pistol there. .45ACP is a common sight too. European brands like Glock, Beretta, Taurus, Tanfoglio, Sig, Browning or CZ corner about 60% of the market. A new Glock goes for about US&#36450.-, a Beretta 92 would set you back about US&#36550.- but keep in mind that the dollar is pretty darn strong these days. Serious target shooters go for Sig P210 or the Korth Combat revolver. Ruger and S&W are the only available US handguns, Winchester for rifles, although I think they sell Marlin in Belgium. Exotics like the Steyr AUG is no prob, but the lucky few who have access to a 100m or 300m rifle range prefer the FAL, or anything not .223. Freedom Arms is not available <!--emo&:(--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/sad.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':('><!--endemo-->  Les Bear reigns supreme in the action scene, with beefed up Tanfoglios as a 'low budget' alternative. If you're into big bang, .44Mag is where the buck stops, usually. Me and my .454 are just freaky. Crowdpullers, but freaky. In Holland, there is just one retailer who sells them. I also bought a .45LC Blackhawk from this guy. A box of 50 .45LC cartridges sets me back some US&#3630.- It's the only way to get brass for this caliber. You can find IMI Desert Eagles but not in .50AE; you can't get those on your license in Holland. In short, if it's not .22lr, 9mm, .40S&W, .38Super, .357/.44M, 5,56Nato or 7,62Nato, you've got a problem. My .454 is running solely on that one retailer here in The Hague and my trusty RCBS press. Which is why I'm desperately looking for .45ACP bullets that can stand up to .454 speeds and pressures.

Grtz,
Daniel.
 
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