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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Anyone have a load for 45 acp, 185 gr jacketed bullets with Blue Dot?

I realize this isn't the optimum powder for this light a bullet, but I have pounds of the stuff to use up. These will be strictly a plinking and practice load.

Alliant recommends 10.5 gr for a 200 gr bullet. I could go with that for a low pressure load.

Appreciate any ideas.
 

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I realize this isn't the optimum powder for this light a bullet, but I have pounds of the stuff to use up.
The older Alliant manuals would list a load for nearly every powder that was even close to suitable, and the fact that they don't list a load for BD and that bullet weight might be an indication it really isn't the best choice.

The only time I ever had a bullet stick in a barrel was with a .38 Special and 110gr bullets, using BD.

You might be better off going for some 230gr Cast stuff, or possibly swapping with another shooter for something a bit faster. It's the best for heavy 20Ga. loads if you reload shotgun.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's a great point. Same holds true with the Sierra Manual...I can usually find a load for about any powder there, but not for BD and this bullet.

THink I have some Bullseye.
 

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I wish you were closer to NJ, I'd swap you some Unique or W231. BD is a great powder for "good" performance in many handgun cartridges. Lower pressure stuff, not so much.

"Good" is the snag. BD is not a real magnum handgun performer, it's a good one. It's a lousy low pressure powder, and can be very unpredictable in many applications.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I wish you were closer to NJ, I'd swap you some Unique or W231. BD is a great powder for "good" performance in many handgun cartridges. Lower pressure stuff, not so much.

"Good" is the snag. BD is not a real magnum handgun performer, it's a good one. It's a lousy low pressure powder, and can be very unpredictable in many applications.
I have a bunch of 200 gr JHP's on order and will use up pound or more of BD loading them up. It's taken me 8 years to use up a 5 pound keg of the stuff. Used most of it w/in a couple years, but my reloading has slowed down.

It is a versatile powder, but I'm sick of looking at it.
 

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I have made good use of an old lot of Blue Dot in my ACPs, but only with 230 grain cast bullets. I'm not sure you can get enough in an ACP case for a viable load with 185 grain bullets. As with the others, I believe there are better powders for your use.
 

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starting point

Anyone have a load for 45 acp, 185 gr jacketed bullets with Blue Dot?

I realize this isn't the optimum powder for this light a bullet, but I have pounds of the stuff to use up. These will be strictly a plinking and practice load.

Alliant recommends 10.5 gr for a 200 gr bullet. I could go with that for a low pressure load.

Appreciate any ideas.


Ammoguide.com shows a load with a remington jacketed 185g SWC, Blue Dot 10.2g (max) at 1014fps
also....185g FMJSWC, 7.3g Blue dot for 667 fps. That give you quite a range to work with
 

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I was fully prepared to think BD just too slow to run in the .45 ACP, but QuickLOAD agrees that 10 to 12 grains would be workable, but the results it gives vary dramatically with different bullet seating depths. You'd need to provide COL and bullet length to get a better estimate.

Ballistic efficiency looks to be terrible, with a lot of powder blowing out unburned (30 or 40 percent). Also, I think you can expect some erratic ignition due to primers unseating the bullets and pushing them forward to the throat before burning gets well underway. Given that the stuff will not burn fully or easily and that the bullet can be unseated anyway, you may want to try magnum primers with, say, 9 grains and work up toward the higher numbers? See if that finds the best combination? This load will run best at maximum pressures and will probably give 1000 to as much as 1150 fps from a 5" tube. Due to incomplete burning, it will probably leave a pretty dirty gun.
 

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I have loaded the Nosler Custom Competition 185 grain, JHP on top of 10.4 grains of Blue Dot and shot them this weekend. This was out of my Para Ordnance 1911 (all stainless w/5" barrel). These loads shot quite well. I did not notice any unburnt powder. Further, I would think that if the powder is not burning in the barrel would there not be excessive muzzle flash? I have no/very little muzzle flash with this load.

I will say that I use the LEE crimp die, and heavily crimp them. Perhaps the crimp adds enough pressure to allow the powder to build pressure before the bullet hits the rifling? I use regular large pistol primers-not the magnums.

I am quite happy with this load. It is fairly snappy in regards to recoil. No cycling issues at all. I went through 100 rounds in about 20 minutes. Love the way the Para balances. After recoil the pistol falls right back into the exact position that you were sighting on before the shot.
 

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And as an aside, I'm sitting here at my desk looking at the spent casings from yesterdays events, and they don't seem to be dirty inside the casings at all. In fact, I'd say they APPEAR to be as clean, if not cleaner, than most range brass that I buy. I have not shot these loads over a chrono, but would love to just to see how fast they are going.
 

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Yes, the crimp is below the casing. I've noticed that if I have to pull a bullet because of a primer not seated properly, that the base of the bullet is actually "squished" where the die collapses the case onto the bullet. The nose of the bullet is unaffected. I previously had a problem with bullets coming OUT of the case while in the magazine from recoil, and then they would fail-to-feed. I realized this after trying to unload a magazine that kept jamming. I could see the scratch marks on the bullet from where it was seated in the brass, and now exposed once the bullets moved forward. After that, I started using the Lee crimp die and problem solved.
 

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i tried Unique once in the 45, was all wrong, but Blue Dot would be very wrong, even if old manuals show it for some loads, Blue Dot is medium slow burning pistol powder more likely found in a .357 mag. one under the good old magnum powder 2400.
 
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