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What would be required beyond a new 5 shot cylinder to convert a Super Redhawk in .480 Ruger to a .475 Linebaugh? Seems like it might be an economical way to get a .475.  Any thoughts?
 

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Eric,

The 475 Linebaugh and economics do not go together. Its possible once the 480's hot the market some of the gunsmiths may look into the idea of a conversion like your thinking but you need to give it some time. Let these guns hit the market and find out if any gremlins are lurking before thinking about the next step.

Personally, I doubt most folks would care to touch off a full house 475 in a Super Redhawk. The grip shape should offer more punishment than the Bisley style. Most of the gunsmiths doing conversions only offer the cartridge using the Bisley grip frame and I don't know of a double action 475 being offered.

I'm hoping that the cartridge will be offered in the Bisley line. Either 5 or 6 shot. It's not a fire breathing round like the Linebaugh but it might be fun.
 

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Eric
I have a little experience with both the .475 and .500 Linebaugh cartridges. I also have quite a bit of experience modifying firearms since I used to be a gunsmith. I can see your point of converting the .480 to .475 and using the existing barrel (same diameter) but where most of the labor comes in is in making the cylinder. Especially on a double action where the extractor-star must be custom made. The time necessary to fit a barrel is much less. Also I whole-heartedly agree with MT about not wanting to fire a Super Redhawk .475. Having fired both the .475 and .500 side by side the recoil of the .475 feels much sharper. No doubt because the .475 runs at higher pressure than the .500. A Super Redhawk .500 would be a much better choice. I believe Hamilton Bowen still makes them.
                                           Good Luck
                                              Dave
 

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NOT SURE IF HE IS STILL DOING IT, BUT JACK HUNTINGTON WAS CONVERTING SOME OF THE TAURUS RAGING BULLS TO 475 LINEBAUGH LAST YEAR. IF I REMEMBER CORRECTLY STARTING PRICE WAS AROUND &#36500 HAVE NOT HEARD OF ANY REPORTS ON THEM THOUGH?<!--emo&???--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt='???'><!--endemo-->      JIM.
 

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Dave wrote, ..."Having fired both the .475 and .500 side by side the recoil of the .475 feels much sharper. No doubt because the .475 runs at higher pressure than the .500. "....

Dave - could you provide additional information regarding operating pressures and "felt" recoil.  I've been reading all I can on this topic 'here' and at other sites.  I 'm a "Newbie" to ballistics/wheel guns and this topic facinates me; I'm in the process of purchasing my first big bore...either a 44 or 45.s

God Bless,

Alan
 

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Hamilton Bowen builds the .475 and .500 on Ruger double actions. Felt recoil is very subjective. One person likes it in one style of gun and the other guy hates it. Personally I like the Super Redhawk's recoil impulse over the Freedom Arms, but then again that's just me.

God Bless

Chris
 

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Alan
I probably should have been more specific when talking about the recoil of the .475s and .500s. Of course, I've fired both on numerous occasions but on the day to which I was referring to in my previous post we had on hand three of the big-bore monsters. Two Ruger Bisleys in .475 and .500 Linebaugh and one Bisley-Maximum in .500 Maximum caliber. Let's not discuss that last one. I honestly believe playing with my crocs is more fun! Both the .475 and .500 were built by John Linebaugh on Ruger Bisleys and are identical except for caliber. I guess the .475 would be a tad heavier because it has smaller holes but not enough to write home about. The bullets were within 5 grs weight of each other and the powder charges within 1.5grs. According to John the .475 runs at about 50,000 CUP while the .500 churns up about 30,000 CUP. The cartridges are ballistically similar except for pressure. I don't exactly know how pressure affects recoil but I do know that the recoil of the .475 feels noticeably sharper. This was confirmed by the other four shooters who also fired the guns side by side. Of course, I completely agree with Chris. Felt recoil is very subjective and depends on many factors. I also agree with him about the grip shape of the Ruger Super Redhawk being better than the FA revolver. But in recoil control the Bisley beats them all. It rolls in your hand and keeps a lot of the recoil off your palm. I'm not sure if the .475 has more recoil than the .500. Maybe it's the same amount of force delivered a different way. Perhaps someone with more knowledge on the pressure-recoil subject can help us out. One more thing I just thought of, the .500 really isn't any more uncomfortable to fire than hot .454 Casull handloads. With both cartridges I can fire about 50 rounds without becoming fatigued. But with the .475 I have to rest at about 30 rounds.
                                       Hope This Helps
                                             Dave
 
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