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Hey guys, I have a new Contender bbl, 21" TC, with Leupold 2-7 scope. I loaded up some 120 and 130 gr bullets, went out to try them, and I am getting stinging. From the first bullet, the string goes upward and the 5th bullet is about 4 inches above the first one. Both bullet sizes did the same thing. I got home and was thinking about it, and am thinking it must be a forearm thing. I was holding the forearm all the way up front to rest it. I am wondering if I change the forearm or rest it further back? What do you think based on the limited info. Thanks, Wallacem in Georgia
 

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Wallace,

That sounds like either a forend problem or a scope issue. You don't usually see THAT much stringing from just the stock, but it's possible.
 

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"Holding" in your hand? A firm rest,i.e., bags / mechanical rest, would let the warming barrel string vertical....

I've isolated this occurance by resting THE TRIGGER GUARD to shoot groups - the forearm, not touching anything, can react freely to bbl vibrations....

My Contenders seem to be finicky in this regard. FWIW....
 

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My money's on the forend. Check the bearing surfaces of the forend and if the contact areas are uniform, make sure the forend doesn't make contact with the frame. Is the hinge pin snug and without wiggle? If the barrel is a light weight tube you may have to give it longer between shots to cool a bit. Where you contact the forend on the rest can certainly create verticle dispersion. If it's not the same every time it could walk up the paper.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Guys, thanks for the opinions, I think it confirms my first thoughts, i plan to take it back out and try a couple of changes. My first outing I did not let it cool between shots. I rested it with my hand holding it out at the front with hand resting on the front of my lead sled because the forearm was too short to rest on the front by itself. I am planning to change the rest and try it. Got a feeling it will chang the stringing. Thanks again, Wallacem in Ga
 

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I have a lead sled that I bought to help tame recoil with some big bore rifles. I have had verticle stringing and other problems using this rest. I only use it with a few rifles now. I went back to a traditional front bench rest and eared rear bag. IMO the rigid rear of the lead sled prevents the rifle from recoiling "normally/freely" and causes some strange vibrations. I have several rifles that will shoot great from the regular rest. Put them in the lead sled and the groups will string horizontal with one rifle and with several others verticle. I solved some problems by using some foam pipe insulation (get it in any hardware store) I cut a short section split it and place it under the butt stock at the rear where it makes contact. There is a split on most of this foam tubing. the foam solved a grouping problem with a double rifle that did not like the sled. If I had known the lead sled was used my first suggestion would have been to try another rest.
Yesterday at the range a shooter had a mechanical rest (Cabelas I think) and he was shooting a 338WM and the rifle was velcro strapped in the rest and bungee corded down tight. Suprisingly it shot very well. I suggested after it was sighted in that he shoot it without the rest to see if it still shot to point of aim. Not even close! Another box of ammo wasted.
I'm not a huge fan of mechanical rests. I think they have there place but my experiences have been mixed.
JMHO
 

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Hey guys, I have a new Contender bbl, 21" TC, with Leupold 2-7 scope. I loaded up some 120 and 130 gr bullets, went out to try them, and I am getting stinging. From the first bullet, the string goes upward and the 5th bullet is about 4 inches above the first one. Both bullet sizes did the same thing. I got home and was thinking about it, and am thinking it must be a forearm thing. I was holding the forearm all the way up front to rest it. I am wondering if I change the forearm or rest it further back? What do you think based on the limited info. Thanks, Wallacem in Georgia
Wallacem; Contenders stringing shots vertically is not an uncommon or incurable problem. I had a Custom Shop 24 inch 30-30 barrel that would do that consistently and this is what I have done to get mine to be a consistent one inch group performer.

BTW, from my Contender and G2 Contender experience I think you have more of a lockup problem then fore end positioning and pressure problem.

First off if you own a Contender and have never gone to Mike Bellm's web site you are missing out on what it takes to make one of these rifles really shoot. It is http://www.bellmtcs.com/store/index.php?cid=563 go there and read his numerous how to articles, you will be well pleased.

Back to my Contender.
1. I replaced the hinge pin with an oversized hinge pin that has a slight interference fit. Bellm sells these for a couple of bucks; however, I used a 3/8 inch diameter machinist’s dowel pin that was just right.
2. Probably the most important thing that improved my accuracy was replacing the locking lug spring with a heavy duty unit. I wound a much stiffer spring on my lathe and the action now locks up like a bank vault. Again Bellm sells these for a couple of bucks.
3. My barrel had one of the one piece locking lugs, if yours is the same go back to TC and they will probably send you one of the newer two piece units for free.
4. If your Contender has a bad trigger go to the Bellm web and he has a section with step to step pictures on how to correct this, if you are not a total clutz you could do this. Don’t take that personally, but if you don’t want to tackle that yourself call Bellm.
5. I did bed my fore end so that the barrel only touches at the two mounting screws and is free and also that the fore end does not touch the action anywhere.
6. Replace the weak hammer main spring with one of Bellem's heavy duty springs to get reliable ignition. Contenders and Encors are lacking in this area.

Reloading for a break action rifle requires different sizing procedures then what you would use for other type actions to insure adequate case life and to obtain top level accuracy. Again (I hate to sound like a stuck needle) Bellm’s web will provide you all the info you need on this. What I do is back my sizing die out a bit and while I am adjusting my sizing die I remove the decaping pin. I will size a case and then insert the case in the chamber, place a .0015 feeler gauge behind the case and try to gently close the action. If it doesn’t close move the die down a bit and try it again. Continue doing this until your action will just close on a .0015 feeler gauge and the gauge can be pulled out of the action. Now, lock the die ring and measure the distance between the bottom of the die and your cartridge holder with the feeler gauges and record this just incase you ever change your lock ring position you will be able to come back to the correct setting, this is why I backed out the decaping pin. Now screw your decaping pin back and you are ready to size your cases for best accuracy and case life in a break action rifle. This includes H&R’s.

One last peculiarity with my G2 Contender is that I find that for best accuracy I still need to “snap” the action closed with a degree of authority.

Where are you in Georgia?
 
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