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I have often heard fellow shooters claiming that the 8-point crimp is superior to the 6-point crimp, and that the 8-point crimp is a mark of superior quality loads. The only thing I know for certain is that the 8-point crimp gathers slightly more material from the case length. So, can anyone here shed little light on this subject? Which is better, and why?
 

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Me, too

Good question. I'm interested in the answer also.
My impression was/is that the six point crimp shows up mostly on field loads - why I have that impression, I do not know other than........a couple of years ago, I bought about a thousand or so fired Federal paper hulls 12 ga. I got about six hundred usable hulls from that. ALL of those hulls have six point crimps. What conclusions, if any, can be drawn from that? For what kind of use are Federal Paper shotshells intended?
Maybe someone will add some info.
Pete
 

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My curosity is also raised. Don't quite see the more material requirement as the radius of a shell remains same whether 6 or 8 point crimp is used. Can see where the folds that go down into the shot column could be more problematic with the 6 point than the 8 point. That might make for poor patterning of the shot column. Another possibility is the ability to remain sealed for micro second longer increasing pressure and powder burn efficiency. There might be a smoother release of the shot column when fired with a 8 point crimp over 6 point crimp. I've also heard the quality statement made over the years.
 

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Does not really matter to me

I load both 6 and 8 point crimps and just change the crimp starter as required. Whatever I shot never knew the difference. All the best...
Gil
 

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I have often heard fellow shooters claiming that the 8-point crimp is superior to the 6-point crimp, and that the 8-point crimp is a mark of superior quality loads. The only thing I know for certain is that the 8-point crimp gathers slightly more material from the case length. So, can anyone here shed little light on this subject? Which is better, and why?
The folded region on a 6pt sits farther into the shot than an 8pt.

I've loaded hulls with both for years, and I've also patterned them with different sizes of shot, from 1B to #8's. Of the things that can affect a pattern, 6/8pt crimp might have the least affect, as I have never seen a bit of difference.
 

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Particularly with Winchester plastic 6pt crimps, they welded the pt area and when fired this causes a loss of material which then creats a hole in the crimp. Large shot will usually stay in but smaller ones, like #8 or #9s, don't! As stated, I think this was mostly used in what was intended to be field loads by Winchester while their AA stuff had the 8pt crimp. I've also found 8pt crimps in better-quality field loads.

I haven't loaded paper in over 40 years so I have no experience on those but I do collect older shotshells and I can't recall ever seeing an 8pt crimp on them. Perhaps its something about the plastics that make the 8pt better?
 

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Learned shotshell loading on a Lee hand tool. Worked good on paper hulls.

The plastic ones, not so good.

Would sometimes drip wax on the six segment shells to keep the shot in.

Eight segment crimp worked alot better! Winchester AA were the good ones. Remington "blue magic" also.
There were a few others (both hi and low brass) that worked well.

The Lee tool is not made anymore that I know of? I still have one for 20 and 12 gauge (would like one for 410 bore).

I kinda suspect that plastic hulls was the demise of these tools?

Anyway, I mostly prefered the hulls with 8 segments for good reloads even with plastic (hi-tech polymer) hulls.

Been away from shot shell loading along time now.

Cheezywan
 

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8 point is easier to get a good crimp with. I'm not sure why they even have 6 point crimps on 12 and 20 since it can't be easier to have two seperate crimps than one and 8 works so much better. With 28 gauge and .410, six is all that fit.
 

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The number of points on the crimp is irrelevant. The load height,setting on the crimp start die,and finish crimp,plus the condition of the hull being loaded,determine the quality of the finished shell. I still load Federal paper hulls on a Hollywood turret machine,they are indistinguishable from the factory shell. Paper shells are still a favorite with many target shooters.I load five gauges.With the exception of the 28 and 410 bore,which only use 6 point crimps,it is umimportant whether I use 6 or 8 point crimps,as all my field loads are made with new unfired cases. Either one does what I want it to,with the proper components.
 

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I think some tools just have difficulty with a six-point crimp with some loads.

The "better" tools don't much care.

More operater "work" can get past that with the "lessor" tool though.


Could re-load some of the old paper hulls until the paper was gone. Then you had a Muzzle-loader using the brass part to hold a cap.

Cheezywan
 
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