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There is a great artical in the the Feb. issue of American Rifleman about Winchester 94's that were used in military service. Unfortunatly, the web site is a month behind so you have to have the actual magazine or wait for the web site to catch up. Just thought I would share as I had no idea until reading this artical that 94's were ever used by our armed services.
 

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They were called the "Spruce Guns" and were used by forces stationed on the West coast to free up bolt rifles destined for troops who were fighting. Spruce was used to build airplanes at the time and the 94's involved had standard walnut stocks. They fall into a certain serial number run and had military marking's so can be identified.
 

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They were an "assault rifle" in the day. Good rate of fire and very reliable. Short, handy,and accurate they are! I'd feel pretty well armed with one even today.

I have not recieved my magizine yet. I look forward to the read!

Cheezywan
 

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My "Spruce Gun" has a gum wood stock, they were made about 1917 for use in WW1 and only about 2000 were marked with the US mark. Also, Canada and England uaed the 94 during WW11 for home defense. Number used is unknowm but they too fall into a narrow serial number range (1,35X,XXX). These guns are marked with the Canadian "C" over broadhead arrow symbol.

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According the the article, the name 'spruce rifle' had nothing to do with what the 94 stocks were made of.
The 94's were acquired to send to the Pacific Northwest where there had been some labor troubles, etc, that might impede the harvesting of sitka spruce. Sitka spruce was the basic material used in those days to build airplanes, and therefore needed for the military.
 

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According the the article, the name 'spruce rifle' had nothing to do with what the 94 stocks were made of.
The 94's were acquired to send to the Pacific Northwest where there had been some labor troubles, etc, that might impede the harvesting of sitka spruce. Sitka spruce was the basic material used in those days to build airplanes, and therefore needed for the military.

Winchester never used spruce in rifle stocks. Spruce guns were used to guard the spruce forest, hence the name.

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I went to a local gunshop to buy ammo today and leaning against the wall with some old Winchesters was a saddle ring 94. I picked it up and on the receiver top was US and a flaming bomb mark. The dealer confirmed that it was the one he had 2 years ago and sold to an old timer while I was trying to make up my mind about buying it. Guy needed money and brought it back for him to sell. No messing around this time, told him to hold it while I made a quick trip home to my gun money stash. The blueing is gone on the receiver and the stock is rough but the bore is good and the action tight. Great day for me as I received 2 Springfield Garands from CMP and found this 94 while looking for ammo for them. Lots of history today. I live on the Olympic Peninsula and have hiked portions of the Spruce Railroad that have been saved for trails.
 

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Tomc,

Great "find"! That looks to be in about the same condition as most of these "Spruce guns". Does it have the gum wood stocks that most of them had?

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The wood is very plain with no grain character and has dents so it probably is gum wood. I'm not good at wood species. The bore is good and mechanicaly sound so I will probably shoot it just for fun.
 

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That's the fun thing about these old Winchesters. reasonable shooting with good ammo does not reduce the value of the gun. I have seen only one US marked gun with walnut stock and that may not be original. Someone could have changed the wood on that gun at some time.

Fire away and enjoy your rifle.

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That's the fun thing about these old Winchesters. reasonable shooting with good ammo does not reduce the value of the gun. I have seen only one US marked gun with walnut stock and that may not be original. Someone could have changed the wood on that gun at some time.

Fire away and enjoy your rifle.

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I have a 1894 Winchester built in 1906 in 25/35 caliber. There are brass plates on both side of the butt stock that are inlaid into the stock with the letters US and the brass is old and period looking. Does anyone know how the military marked these rifles! It's to professional of a job for someone to have just done it theirselves. You stated you saw a rifle with markings how was it marked??
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Doubt seriously if the OP responds to you from a 13 year old post.
 
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