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Hi to all. This is my first time so please bear with me. I recently bought a sporterized Mauser. I know it was made in 1938. All the serial numbers match (even the bolt) and it has only 3 serial numbers. What throws me is that it has 3 identical Nazi eagles in a row on the right side of the receiver with what appears to be a 63 under each eagle. The 6 is in question but the 3 is clearly read. I can find nothing that explains the 3 eagles. Can some one help? Thanks!!
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Welcome. I see all sorts of stamps on old military rifles. Sometimes there just is no explanation; other times we have good guesses. I can't say I've ever figured out the pattern on where the germans stamped what.

Congrats on your rifle.
 

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Three eagles are proof marks

This is a carryover from WWI and indicates the rifle passed proof tests. All the best...
Gil
 

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is there a web site or sites to authenicate mauser k98. i know the gremans, and others made a ton of them. I know they're WWII or older, because my friends grandfather faught over there ( spoils of war). They were packed in grease, shipped over here, and forgotten for at least 50 to 60 years. bayonets included.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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There are a variety of Israeli mausers floating around. Basically, war spoils that were "scrubbed" and rebarreled in .308. Whatever markings they had were ground off and a big six point start stamped on top of the receiver. Naturally, the barrels were replaced, along with whatever other parts may have needed it by then. Large ring mauser parts are surprisingly interchangeable, given the variety produced around the world.

No telling exactly which model they started out as (k98, vz24, et al). Keep in mind that WWII rifles were sometimes leftover WWI rifles that had already been recycled a time or two, so there are no hard and fast rules. Sometimes you can tell, sometimes not. Could have a mismatch of parts from different countries/decades.

I think I have one around here, somewhere. Got a specific question?
 

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mike g, i'm ignorant about the mauser, and any variant. my specialty ( if you can even say that) is the AK family and other assult weapons. my friend knows i like rifles and gave me that mauser k98 and krag rifle with 1899 stamped on the stock (which is only 5'!!). my friends grandfather must of collected a ton of stuff when he was over there. he gave me a german bayonet and a french ceremonial bayonet i thought was a sword! he said he has other rifles that he wants me to look at. these rifles are packed, and i mean packed with grease ( dont wear a nice shirt while looking at them). i would like to know what and how to clean, maybe a value. if you dont mined i'm probably going to ask more than a few questions.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Best way to get an idea of what they are, or might have been, is pictures of the top of the receiver ring, and also the left side of the receiver (the side opposite the bolt handle when it's turned down). You'll have to use a host like Photobucket to get the pictures here. Use "macro" mode on your digital camera when taking close-ups. Cell phone cameras don't usually have enough detail, FYI.

If those photos don't identify the guns, then it comes down to looking at all the other little markings - proof marks, manufacturer's stamps, etc. Serious collectors will care about everything being original and that gets down to a personal inspection, most likely.

It's gonna be tough to give an expert opinion based on a few pictures, but we'd love to see any pictures, anyway.
 
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