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Well...I had prepped 50 rounds of .308 Win brass last week and decided to start reloading it this morning. I poured the powder into my powder throw and "low and behold"....my first charge threw out a fluorescent green bug. It wasn't dead, but totally anesthetized.

I've almost always had an inside place to reload....new place is smaller...but bigger. I have to do my reloading in the garage now. I have many times done my shotgun reloading in the garage, but this is my first time doing rifle "outside"...so to speak.

I figure I will put a sock over my powder throw from now on.
 

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I'll mention here that it is generally recommended that you don't store your powder in a powder hopper, but rather that you take it out at the end of each loading session and get it into a proper storage container. A few days won't matter, but I've seen how discolored some powder hoppers can become when some powders are left in them, and I had some N140 in a plastic bottle go bad and corrode the steel cap off while another portion of the same lot in the original container stayed good. So the kind of plastic has an effect.

Sometimes storing in a hopper doesn't seem to affect anything, but other times deterioration can occur. If your garage is not climate-controlled, deteriorating influences can be substantially increased by summer temperatures.

99299
 
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I will agree with unclenick but for another reason. In the past left powder in the hopper with several bottles sitting on the bench. Since they were spherical powder and about the same charge volume, ended up dumping 1/2 lb of powder because I couldn't identify it.
 

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I left powder in the hopper - forgetting it was there and found it had "glued" itself to the hopper walls. I had to remove the hopper and soak it in hot soapy water and do some scrubbing to get it out. I don't leave powder in there anymore.
 

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All good points. It pays to be careful with powder storage and to be aware of what powder is in the reloading area. All the best...
Gil
 

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I always place a piece of tape on top of my powder dispenser with the powder name written on it. I normally empty my hopper at the end of a session, but if it goes into the next day which might turn into the next week, I then know which powder is in it.
 

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And all other powder than what's in the measure is in the powder magazine in its original container.

I'll leave powder in the hopper (holds a pound) for a week or so depending on who had what emergency and how long it takes me to get back, but as it is stated, I have various pieces of 2" blue masking tape with powder and charge weight written on them that I affix to the hopper least I forget.

OH! and make sure to put the lid on the hopper. I found a brown recluse in mine a while back and BOY was she mad!!!

Speaking of that, which is the faster burn rate? Brown recluse or black widow.

😁

RJ
 

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black widow has a faster burn rate. brown recluse is a slow slow powder. ;):LOL:
 
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Thanks, so I won't be worried about finding a black widow in my Bullseye. PHEW!!

RJ
 

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Well, it sounds like a play on words to the modern ear, but it isn't. Removing insects is the original meaning of the term "debugging". During WWII, early attempts at computers using relay logic would fail to run when insects crawled in and got between the relay contacts. So when a program didn't run, one of the troubleshooting steps was to go through the machine and clean out insect remains to get it working again. That was first called "debugging" ni 1944, according to the dictionairy. Later the term stuck and came to be applied to finding any kind of fault in a computer, including errors in the programming script. Even later, it came to be applied to troubleshooting pretty much everything that was either a new design or freshly assembled but not working properly, regardless of what it was.

About ten years ago, my house air conditioning stopped working. Just dead. I got out the voltmeter and checked the box and checked the 24VAC thermostat line was switching voltage. Outside, I could hear the contactor in the unit close, but nothing else happened. I took the cover off, and there on one of the contacts was a flattened earwig. They seem to like squeezing in through tight spaces. So I debugged the contactor, and the house was cool once more.
 
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