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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was at a gunsmith yesterday discussing the forcing cone in my OM Blackhawk .45. He agreed it was cut off center and needed recut. When I mentioned having it cut to 11 degrees he said that was not a good idea. Said that angle was for .38 wad cutter bullets, and suggested cutting it to 5 degrees insted.
He said that cutting the forcing cone on this gun would make the rear of the barrel too thin and that would risk other problems.
Reguardless it needs to be recut. I have heard about the 11 degree forcing cones forever and yet I don't know anyone who has had this done. And I have never had a revolver forcing cone recut either.

So my question is basicly for Ruger Blackhawk .45 Colt owners. Other big bores would qualify I guess.
Have any had their guns forcing cones recut, and if so to what angle? And what was the result? Any problems?
 

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I defer to the smith's diagnosis. Not a gunsmith but engineering type tells me the angle necessary would be directly related to the timing accuracy and lockup of the particular firearm. Certainly a shallower angle could be recut if necessary, but common sense says it wouldn't be necessary. I would technically believe that the shallow angle would make a gentler transition to barrel and more accurate firearm. What's the consensus and why?
 

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J, Miller & ruger No.3

I have been interested in this subject for quite a while.
Get a copy of Ross Seyfrieds article in the August 1994 issue of Guns and Ammo. Its titled Minute of Angle Revolver. Seyfried had three barrels made up for a special Ruger Blackhawk. One had a "normal" forcing cone, one a Taylor throat - 5/8" of freebore, and one no forcing cone at all.

The normal focing cone would not quite shoot minute of angle. The Taylor throat went just under 1 minute. No throat did not respond well, but there may have been outside drivers.

Not all groups were 1 minute, but Seyfried did some remarkable shooting.

You will not be handicapped with a standard forcing cone. Remember that your bullets must fit the throat first, then the barrel. Norm Johnson from the Cast Bullet Association shoots no lube cast bullets in his revolvers, but they fit his gun!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
william iorg,
Thanks for your response.  I have been doing a lot of reading and research on the forcing cone subject, and even talking to the smiths at Oglesby and Oglesby.  The closest gunshop to me in IL that does a lot of work on Rugers.  Almost everyone agrees that the factory angle is the way to go.  The only other suggestion I got that made sense was that if I had my forcing con recut, go factory angle, but if I had the barrel set back and a new one cut, go 11 degrees.
So I have decided that since this one is just going to be recut to clean up a sloppy factory job, I'm going with the 5 degree angle.  
As for my bullets fitting my gun I am well aware of that aspect.  My chamber throats are at .454.  So I am stuck with bullets of that size or a bit more.  Not easy to come buy unless I special order them.
JM
 
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