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Can i do a glass bedding job with this stuff with the ambient temp. at about 50 degrees? I haven't ordered the Acraglass yet so any other bedding material you know to work well let me know.
The only place i can do this is in my basement which isn't heated.
Thanks,
Jim
 

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Yes you can. No trouble. Just pay attention to all details and let it "set" some longer than instructions indicate.

"Warmer" would be better though!

Cheezywan
 

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I've used "Acraglass" to bed several of my rifles, with great results. However I did the work during the Summer months when the temp. was 72 degrees & over.
 

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The hardening of any epoxy comes from the chemical reaction between the glue's components -- a resin and a hardener. This reaction will occur at any temp, although at cooler temps it may happen a bit slower. At any temp, good advie for AcraGlas is to give it plenty of time to set. I won't shoot any rifle I bed with it for a week after doing the job.
 

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Also, besure to apply the "Release Agent" to any degreased metal that will come into contact with your application of AcraGlas. Don't want to glue your barreled action to your stock.;)
 

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hi,guys can anyone give me a break down on the bedding proses that i could follow as i have never seen it done or no anyone who as do it thanks Pete
 

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My shpeal:
The bottom side of a Howa action looks like the bottom side of a Mauser action.

My system for bedding this kind of barreled action is that epoxy is in 4 places:
1) behind the recoil lug
This epoxy is to be a "low compliance" [stiff] and consistent connection of the recoil force to the stock.
2) under the flat part of the receiver for the square inch behind the recoil lug. This is contiguous with behind the recoil lug epoxy.
This epoxy is to be a low compliance and consistent connection of the bullet spin reaction force to the stock.
3) under the first inch of barrel in front of the receiver. The epoxy only goes up 45 degrees from the bottom on the sides of the barrel.
This epoxy is to be a low compliance and consistent connection of the front action screw force to the stock. That force is already supported behind the recoil lug and needs to be supported in front of the front action screw.
4) around the pillar that supports the rear tang of the receiver. The pillar is pre compressed, perpendicularly aligned, and flush to receiver aligned, with a small diameter head action screw. The pillar is scored and the stock hole is tapped so the epoxy gets traction. I make pillars from 3/8" outside diameter 1010 steel tubing.
The rear pillar is to be a low compliance and consistent connection of the rear action tang force to the stock. The rear pillar acts as the 3rd dominant point in defining the plane of the barreled action to stock connection. The other two dominant points are the two sides of the flat epoxy for the inch behind the recoil lug.

After the bottom metal is bedded in front and the rifle is assembled, the rear pillar should support the bottom metal in the rear. The magazine engagement the receiver is checked for feeding. The bedding job is tested by banging the barrel with a palm while griping the stock wrist with the other hand. The sound should be high frequency with long sustain and no buzzing. That is because the barrel is floated in the stock and the two act as a tuning fork, while the wrist is at a node. High frequency with high mass implies low compliance. The sustain is from the low losses due to low compliance coupling. We want low compliance so the barreled action mass and stock mass are effectively summed in reaction to the recoil before bullet escapement. The higher the mass rifle, the easier it it to control recoil and get accuracy. The buzzing would mean there is not enough clearance some where.

Shoot the rifle. Then put some piece of dirt between the action and the bedding. It will not make the same sound and it will not give the same accuracy, as the compliance of the fit has been raised. Then clean that dirt out of there:)

What does it all mean?
Epoxy does not get on the sides of the receiver.

Here are the experts:
http://riflestocks.tripod.com/bedding.html
http://www.charm.net/~kmarsh/glasbed.html
http://yarchive.net/gun/rifle/pillar_bedding.html
http://www.gun-tests.com/performance/nov96beddingjob.html
http://www.ranchtrippin.com/bedding/
http://www.scorehi.com/main.htm
http://www.6mmbr.com/pillarbedding.html
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/Store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=9899
http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/catSearch.aspx?c=1418
http://www.z-hat.com/Accurate.htm
http://www272.pair.com/stevewag/mmrifle/mmrifle3.html
http://www272.pair.com/stevewag/turk/turkbed1.html
http://www272.pair.com/stevewag/turk/turkbed2.html
http://www272.pair.com/stevewag/turk/turkbed3.html
http://yarchive.net/gun/rifle/remington700.html


Here is me:
1) The epoxy resin leaked out of the stock and action, I had to:
Chisel out the epoxy.
Replace my pants.
Replace the carpet.
Replace the upholstered chair.
Get out the book and re read.
Start over.
I now use Devcon Steel putty, so I don't have to fight time or gravity.
No more kid's play dough.
No more dams.
2) I have broken stocks over my knee while getting the barrel action out of the stock after bedding.
The fixes for this are; a) never take them out ala benchrest, b) put them in the freezer so the steel will shrink more than the epoxy, c) use less epoxy
3) The epoxy that would never harden.
It turns out that the temperature at which the epoxy and catalyst were first mixed is more important than the temperature at which it cures.
I now store all the glass bedding materials in the house now, not the shop, so they are always warm enough to be used.
4) I have glass bedded a Ruger #1, a Savage 110, an SKS, a Ruger 10/22, a pre 64 M70, a 91/30, etc.
It is best to concentrate on one type of rifle and try to get it right. I have dozens of 1898 surplus Mausers and that is my go-to action for projects.
5) Steve Wagner's website shows 98 Mauser pillars being made from pipe, getting ribbed by a hack saw for epoxy to grip, and centering the screws with masking tape.
My reaction was to buy 6' lengths of 3/8" tubing in Chrome Moly, Brass, and Stainless. I do rough pillars up with a hack saw and center the screws with masking tape.
6) The "American Rifleman" Oct. 2002 article "Tang Pillar Bedding the Model 98 Mauser" by Norman E. Johnson, that showed a pillar already bedded in the rear of a Mauser being faced with a vertical mill. I was horrified at the effort and inaccuracy.
I sought to get the pillars fixtured perpendicular, flush, and pre compressed to the receiver, with little compression of the receiver to the stock.
The Mauser action screws have .390" heads and .254" shanks.
The 3/8" tubing has and outside diameter of .375" and an inside diameter of .306"
I need ~ .048" of bushing to center the screw in the pillar.
That is ~.025" per side. That should be ~ 5 layers of .005" masking tape, but is always much less, like ~ 2 layers.
For the pillars to be pre compressed, the washers need an inside diameter of .255" and an outside diameter of .390".
There are no such washers. They need to be fabricated from other washers.
I put the screws, tape, pillars, and washers on the receiver and tighten the screws.
I drill out the stock to accept this to drop in.
I put Steel putty on the outside of the pillars, and the inside of the holes in the stock.
I put Steel putty on the stock behind the recoil lug to accept the recoil force and the action screw force.
This way, as steel in concrete is best pre stressed in tension, pillars in stock are best pre stressed in compression.
 

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Jim, I used to do boat epoxy work in marginal temps. I would get my wife's old suntan lamp to heat up the area during prep and set time....... that should work fine in your basement. You'll get probably 10-15 degrees over ambient to get a good set.
 

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Any paste wax, even auto wax, may be used as a release agent, and to fill voids where the bedding compound needs to be blocked from to avoid locking the metal to the stock.

Just slather it on, w/o buffing off, and/or pack it into threaded holes/etc.

I also wax the stock exterior, since I've found that when concentrating on bedding & setting the barreled action, it's EZ to get some compound on your surgical gloved fingers ( you DID put gloves on, didn't you ? :p ), and transfer bedding compound to the stock exterior/checkering/etc.

A packet of disposable, thin latex gloves are available for a buck or two at almost any paint or auto parts store, BTW.

.
 

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Fresh paste wax is so soft, it doesn't make any difference - the excess will just get squeezed out. (I apply it immediately prior to placing the bedding compound & inserting the barreled action into the stock.)

.
 

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Acra-Gel

I fill the voids that I don't want bedding compound in with modeling clay smoothed to the steel . Then apply your release agent . Makes a nice smooth professional looking job . I have switched to the Gel , it's real nice to work with , I leave the action in the stock overnight . If you buy the kit from Brownell's it includes everything you need , including instructions , if it's your first bedding job read the instructions several times first . I have heard that J-B Weld works well but doesn't come with bedding instructions !
 

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Not sure if this applies hhere but anyone looking for walnut stock blanks? If so go to woodplanet.com 100 for sale for 20 apiece if you buy all!
 
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