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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have been shooting for many years now, and I have come to realize thats all i have been doing is shooting. I know about the major brands like Remington, colt and s&w. I know my way around a gun be it semi auto or black powder, and of course I know my different types of ammo. Now its been since high school that I have got any range time. All the guns I used belonged to my step father except the rem 870 pump I have now and I never paid much attention (shocking I know a teen not paying attention :eek:) to really what I was shooting or if I liked it. Now that I have time on my hands after college and finding a job I would LOVE to get back into the sport. currently have the 870 for skeet shooting and have recently added a nice Springfield xd9. Looking for a good rifle next. I dont have any dead set brand preference but have a slight prepper mind set. I want quality something to last that wont break down and if does something I can fix with a little know how. Not against building my own, have been looking at the AR-15 for that but kinda feel outta my depth. Would like something with a clip (nothing major 15 rounds or more) and accurate. I dont have a world class budget but I am willing to pay for quality. Preferably a caliber that is fairly common, I have heard about the L1A1, AR 15, and FN FAL, but I would like to ask around before seeting out for anything. So any advice is welcome and would help.


Happy shooting
 

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Welcome to Shooters Forum, LeopardT. :)

You've got the shotgun and the handgun covered, which leaves you with 2 gaps in your arsenal...a centerfire rifle and a rimfire rifle. There are plenty of ways to go for both, but if I was in your shoes, I'd be looking for a good 22, first.

I'll let others answer the semi-auto questions, as that is not my forte. For your first 22, consider a Marlin or Savage bolt action, or maybe a Ruger 10/22 semi-auto. Experienced shooters often get most of their trigger time from a 22, so that their time with the bigger stuff is more effective. YMMV
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was thinking of getting a 22 last but may bump that up now. Thanks for the help will keep it in mind when I go looking for a rimfire. And thanks for the welcome.
 

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Broom +1.
The Ruger 10-22 sounds like it is right what you are looking for.

Quality and low price ($209 and up). Loads of upgrades available.

and eventually when the ammo crisis goes away, lots of cheap ammo.
 

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Get a .22 rifle - you can find them that look like an AR, or just plain bolt guns with walnut stocks or anything in between. And a .22 handgun, while you are at it. You won't regret it.

I suppose it's possible to learn to shoot well without a .22, but I'd hate to try.

My house is sort of overrun with .22s, because I like them. Lever, semi-auto, bolt, revolver.... they're all good ;)
 

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A .22LR is a choice that you'll likely never regret. Since you mention the AR-7, Ruger has a takedown 10/22 now and Marlin still makes their Papoose model, I assume. There are plenty of other workmanlike models to choose from. Sooner or later you'll "need" a rimfire rifle. Depending on availability, this could be the right time. You'll probably get better accuracy out of a full sized, non takedown rifle and that is important in a .22LR.

I can say for sure that bolt action centerfire sporters are not only available but an unprecedented bargain right now. Ruger, Savage, Remington, Marlin, Mossberg all have "budget" rifles which seem to shoot well, if published testing can be believed. I've probably missed a few options. Some have detachable mags which could be very handy for "serious" use. These guns seem to be mostly overlooked right now.

Ammo availability may be a big factor. If your goal is to be "prepped", you'll want to make sure that ammo is available at a price you can live with. In the long run, .223 will probably be a good bet, but not all of the boltguns above come in .223.

For purely defensive use, an AR-15 or equivalant would be hard to beat, providing you don't get abused in the deal. Prices and availability should be returning to normal within a few months. I'd probably wait to get one of these.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks I will look into all of them. I appreciate all the advice. While on the subject of an ar 15 when looking at lowers it seems like it would not be to hard to machine one and buy a parts kit any one know the legality of this. I don't want to run on the bad side of the law but it seems like it would be a fun project.
 

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From what I have found, so long as you abide by all federal and state laws you can mfg your own firearm. It is when you try to sell it that you have problems.

Now the part of the firearm that you will run into trouble with is the receiver, ie the stripped lower. SO if you make one you cannot sell it unless you serialize and go through the proper channels. BUT I am not a lawyer and would recommend you talk to one that specializes in BATF laws prior to doing this project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I see. Might check into this later sounds like my next addition will be most likely the 10/22 ruger. Thanks for all the advice guys. If I find out more on the mfg of a lower I will be sure to post it around here along with maybe a step by step of how it went.
 

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Do you plan on hunting game in the future? If so you should check the game laws to insure that the caliber you choose is a legal caliber for the game you intend to hunt. Here in Washington you can not hunt big game (deer and larger) with a caliber smaller than a 243.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Do you plan on hunting game in the future? If so you should check the game laws to insure that the caliber you choose is a legal caliber for the game you intend to hunt. Here in Washington you can not hunt big game (deer and larger) with a caliber smaller than a 243.
what? really? I still remember my first deer rifle was a .223 single shot. Never heard of a game law like that. Gonna have to start looking into this now.
 

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Hey BigZ do you ever have any malfunctions that are not possible to fix your self. Barring something major that you would need a licensed gunsmith.
No. Aside from potentially wanting a couple special tools for rarely performed jobs, it takes roughly: a vise, receiver vise blocks, a hammer, punches, barrel nut wrench, anti-seize, stock spanner wrench, razor blade, electrical tape (protection when hammering), 3/4" wrench and a field gauge to build one. Off the top of my head. A guy could build one ground-up in less than an hour after doing his first learning build.
Granted, I've only built a couple, and recently. But that's my experience. And the rifles work perfectly fine and shoot great.
 
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