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Yes of course. Different glues have their place in different applications. I'm speaking only of the OPs circumstance and question.
 

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RE: Split boards from reloading presses. Do your self a favor and buy a slab of steel about 1/4" thick a foot wide and the length of your bench width. Bolt the press to the steel and the steel to the bench. You can even transfer some force to the wall if needed.

I had a furnished apartment up in the mountains during gunsmiths school and the furniture was really weak....
 
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RE: Split boards from reloading presses. Do your self a favor and buy a slab of steel about 1/4" thick a foot wide and the length of your bench width. Bolt the press to the steel and the steel to the bench. You can even transfer some force to the wall if needed.

I had a furnished apartment up in the mountains during gunsmiths school and the furniture was really weak....
That's FUNNY, right there! So, how much in damages did you have to pay out? About the bench-yes, that steel plate is what I glued to the repair on the board! It won't split now!
 

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Gunsmithing students are notoriously hard to house. Almost adjoining the school is a set of windowless apartments we called The Grottoes. Students bolted benches to the wall and test fired in the basement utility room and most of the apartments had the grates off the heating system so pots and pans and reloading components could be passed all over the building without going outside. There were bullet holes....

One of my instructors lived in a motel room and had his loading press bolted to the small stove. He had a VZ-24 action in the bathroom sink being cleaned of cosmoline with Coleman fuel!! Don't smoke in there!!
 
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Discussion Starter #25
I pitty those Landlords!
They should go to a factory auction and buy up all the steel tables for Kitchen tables, buy the file cabinets for Dressers and buy up all the steel sinks for the bathrooms! Make the students feel right at home.
Actually that sounds like the Auto mechanic students that I used to live near in Laramie Wyoming. They disassemble, clean and reassemble engines in their rooms. :)
As a culinary student we used to build kitchens in our dorm rooms to practice and keep ourselves fed. The Fire Marshal used to have fits when he came to insect the dorms.
 

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I am hoping this is the right location for this question.

I have been working on and off on a rifle stock design for myself. I had glued a piece oflighter color walnut to the walnut stock so I could carve the forend. It fell off while I was working on it. I'm not a wood worker and this is a first stab at doing a gunstock. the adhesive I used was a Gorilla glue made for wood.

Can anyone tell me what I should have been using. The two pieces were mated perfectly flat together.
Are these parts assembled with a biscuit or dowel type setup?

I'd appreciate any input on this.
ACRAGLAS. Done a number of custom stock things and never had a problem with it. Only thing I added with a couple of grip extensions was use a screw with a brass plate to cover it
 

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RE: Split boards from reloading presses. Do your self a favor and buy a slab of steel about 1/4" thick a foot wide and the length of your bench width. Bolt the press to the steel and the steel to the bench. You can even transfer some force to the wall if needed.

I had a furnished apartment up in the mountains during gunsmiths school and the furniture was really weak....
My portable reloading bench is two pieces of laminated plywood. Works fine. One top has a CoAx and a Rockchucker, the other has a Star on it
 

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I'm wondering if you are trying to butt join a piece of wood onto the end of the stock. The reason is end grain of wood does not glue very well. You need to have a dowel or some other kind of joint(mortise and tenon) where you are gluing side grain.
 

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Gunsmithing students are notoriously hard to house. Almost adjoining the school is a set of windowless apartments we called The Grottoes. Students bolted benches to the wall and test fired in the basement utility room and most of the apartments had the grates off the heating system so pots and pans and reloading components could be passed all over the building without going outside. There were bullet holes....

One of my instructors lived in a motel room and had his loading press bolted to the small stove. He had a VZ-24 action in the bathroom sink being cleaned of cosmoline with Coleman fuel!! Don't smoke in there!!
Here you go Jack. This is the first top was done as a concept 3 or so years ago and worked nicely. Laminated wood based on an old Workmate base.

The second top with the Star is in the shop. The exception here is I did it right



 

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I started making knives in 1970 and did quite a bit of research on the 'perfect epoxy' for my use. I settled on Conap Easypoxy said:
Where are you buying Conap???? The last time I tried to find any, I was informed it is no longer being made!
 

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Not sure of your application, but some of the Glues such as Weldbond, Bondrite, etc... when applied properly - clamped will give you a permanent (unless you are putting your wood project underwater) OH My then why use wood .. all levity intended ...
I have used both for multiwood species .. multiple board laminated wood stocks ... ((Bondrite is stainable) and a beauty to work with for pretty results) -- if you just want to glue/bond two pieces of anything together ... think JB Weld or Devcon Steel ... LRB
 

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Not sure of your application, but some of the Glues such as Weldbond, Bondrite, etc... when applied properly - clamped will give you a permanent (unless you are putting your wood project underwater) OH My then why use wood .. all levity intended ...
I have used both for multiwood species .. multiple board laminated wood stocks ... ((Bondrite is stainable) and a beauty to work with for pretty results) -- if you just want to glue/bond two pieces of anything together ... think JB Weld or Devcon Steel ... LRB
Try Devcon Titanium, it's impressive.
 

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Gorrilla glue is great as long as its clamped, but I use common Tite Bond. Epoxy makes a finish-proof joint that will always show.
Personally, I wouldn't use Gorilla Glue, period. I use epoxy, or Crazy Glue, on occasion, just depends on what I'm working on. I use Titebond II on about 99.9% of the time on all my projects, including gluing cloth strips on my jeans and work pants to hold D rings to clip my toolbelt suspenders to. My Marlin stock that is being revamped for about the 6th time has only had the Titebond used, and it holds up fantastic.

Use what you're most comfortable with, and don't be afraid to try scrap wood first, to see if you like the results.

Modern wood glues usually have a holding strength of about 2500 lbs per square inch, so if you break the joint, the wood will break before the glue lets go. Most of my woodworking is clamped with spring clamps, mostly so it will not move before the glue sets a bit, which usually means about a half an hour - which does not mean the joint is cured, just that it is difficult to pull apart, I always wait until the next day to do anything with it. Some of my joints I just set a weight on the piece. And, on occasion, I just put some glue on one piece, rub it around on the other piece to spread the glue, then set it aside - never had any problems.
 
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You can use a Biscuit joint, or dowel the two pieces together with Gorilla glue; However as the gentleman stated before this comment the wood has to be wet or really dampened for the Gorilla glue to perform correctly! Titebond has an exterior glue that will hold up against moisture. I had Biscuit joints that fell apart because I didn't dampen the wood before clamping. It is imperative to clamp quite tightly and leave twice as long as you think for drying! I would finish with a hand rubber oiled finish to prevent any moisture attaching the joint from the outside. You might connect with the adhesive manufactures on how well their adhesive tolerates G forces in case that comes into play with your stock. Hope this helps and is not redundant. Good Luck!
 

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Gorilla glue expands as it sets. If the proper amount is not properly applied and clamped, it will not form a solid joint. These Gorillas, epoxies, etc. are specialty glues. They don't belong in a walnut workshop. This is where yellow glues shine.

IF a quality stockmaker were building for you a walnut stock... and say for example he had to glue two pieces together (let's just say IF he had to), he would use yellow glue and no other (possible exception? white glue). Then he would shape, sand, seal, and finish your rifle stock before sending it to you.

If he we using certain exotic hardwoods for the stock, he might use a different glue, although an oily hardwood, properly prepared, would still be fine with Titebond II or similar.

ON EDIT: Even yellow glues need a tight joint (as you said yours had) and the glue must be spread thinly and evenly. I use an acid brush dipped in water and wrung out with my fingers. Too much or too little glue of any kind will form a weak bond, as will too much or too little clamping pressure.
This is excellent advice. The only things I would add is to spread the glue on both surfaces, and that you'll know you have enough glue in the joint when it oozes out slightly while achieving the desired clamping pressure. Scrape the ooz-out after it has dried but still slightly pliable. How do you know that? Practice. Invest some time in gluing and clamping some scrape pieces before the real thing.

Gorilla glue is basically minimally expanding spray foam. It has terrible sheer strength. It does not soak into wood so it needs an area of glue between the wood pieces to adhere properly. Clamp too much and you starve the joint of glue. It is so messy, I would only use it to glue concrete or brick that is very porous.

Hide glue may work well unless you are grinding to shape the wood around the glued area. The heat generated might effect the glue bond.
 

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Hide glue is normally only used in furniture making, where the possibility exists it would be have to be taken apart sometime in the future, to replace or repair parts. It dries brittle, and does not do well if the joints are stressed. It is usually loosened by applying hot water. It is good for its purpose, as evidenced by antique furniture, which may be hundreds of years old. I would NOT use it on a gun stock.
 

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Hide glue is used in guitars for the neck joint.

HClark-- I find K-20 and K-22 Conap listed at multiple tool suppliers and glue shops. You had me worried!

Here http://www.needfill.co.kr/cd/K20_22.pdf is the spec sheet I first saw in 1970....after weeks of looking. The internet is WONDERFUL!
 

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Yes hide glue is used in guitars for the neck (sometimes) AND all of the internal bracing, bindings, and sides, top, and bottom. Additionally it's used in furniture joints that may need to be taken apart (mentioned above) and almost exclusively in veneering. It isn't applicable to gun stocks though I threw it in my first post as just a possible option because I knew men were going to recommend everything but chewing gum to glue that stock together! :D

Again, yellow glue is all that's needed ... no, more than that, it is superior to all others mentioned for this particular application. This is a walnut gun stock the OP is asking about. Aliphatic resin (yellow glue) is the correct glue to use.
 
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Gorilla Glue dries into a hard plastic like substance. Any glue that dries hard will not hold as well as a glue that stays somewhat plastic. This is why the stock tip came off when the stock was knocked over. It simply broke the glue you used.
Use Tight Bond Two It works extremely well and is water resistant as well. Save the GG for when you want to glue plastic or metals to wood or each other. Also, if you are going to use that stuff wear rubber gloves. It saves having to get the black gunk off your hands.
If you are going to re glue, clean the surfaces thoroughly of all the old gorilla glue before trying to stick them together. Brodie
 

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I used many glues making furniture and like Gorilla glue but like mentioned, it needs strong clamping.
Guns, I use Accra Glass, stained to match. All of you have seen the wood glue fixes on broken stocks. I have repaired many broken stocks and you will never break them again and you will never find the break.
 
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