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Get several yard long sections of common surgical tubing to wrap it. The edges of the break are nice and fresh. DON'T handle it or pry on it and align it perfectly and you'll have a very thin and hard to see joint.
Figure out why it broke after you repair it. It needs to be very solidly glued before re-inletting.

Somebody said Gorilla Glue. It's great stuff IF you can adequately clamp it. Its stronger than some clamps and the joint is forced apart by the glue and then petrified in a VERY screwed up condition. I use it on patterns and construction but never on a stock.
 

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StretchNM is spot on about Tightbond. I use it building Acoustic guitars and all those joints are under constant pressure. I'd have pictures for proof but all was lost in the house fire in January:(
 

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Hey guys, a friend just had the walnut stock on his Ruger 77 .308 split sitting in the safe(!) It's about 30 yrs. old, well cared-for, and his house has normal humidity. He sent me pictures, and it seems to start on the bottom near the front of the magazine floorplate and come forward and up the right side to beside the barrel just in front of the front sight. I'm guessing it originated by the front action screw and just followed the grain (?). I'm wondering if it's been over-tightened over the years, or maybe just a crack that grew. It's the mannlicher style, and he likes it and would rather repair than replace it, I'm sure.

He'll bring it next week when we get together and hunt (muzzleloading) a few days. I do some woodwork, I've got some good quality yellow tite-bond wood glue. What's the best way to clamp it up- rubber bands, painter's tape, padded clamps?
I have a drawer full of inner tube strips and surgical tubing. The hardest part with a crack is working glue in full depth and if glue can run and seep, it is better. Thick, filled glue is way too hard to use. You might see a line with yellow glue but epoxy can be colored.
I use a lot of pins made from brass or steel and even brazing rod. I chuck in a drill and spin through a die for threads but only install after the first glue job is done and never use them where they can be seen. You can also buy threaded pins. Put epoxy in the hole and spin them in.
Stocks cracked at the tang are tough. I drill into the grip and put steel in that contacts the tang or bedding on top of it. Many guns should have a small gap at the tang.
Gorilla glue needs moisture to cure and so does super glue. You will not have time to work or clamp.
I have repaired hundreds of stocks and if you can find the repair, I would give you the gun.
 

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Thanks for the help - we were able to get the Ruger 77 .308 stock glued back together. In addition to the visible crack, it had a hairline crack through the center between the magazine well and trigger, and back to the rear action screw. You could feel the twist/stress in the wood, which I think was partially the cause. We were able to get glue (Titebond) into about all of it, and wrap it tightly for 24 hrs. It's not invisible, but you have to look close to see the repair.
 

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You did good and the joint will be stronger then the wood. As long as wood glue is not used as a filler, works fine. Weird stuff to clamp but rubber can exert pressures like nothing else. Pride is what counts and I am proud of you. GOOD JOB.
 

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I am hoping this is the right location for this question.

I have been working on and off on a rifle stock design for myself. I had glued a piece oflighter color walnut to the walnut stock so I could carve the forend. It fell off while I was working on it. I'm not a wood worker and this is a first stab at doing a gunstock. the adhesive I used was a Gorilla glue made for wood.

Can anyone tell me what I should have been using. The two pieces were mated perfectly flat together.
Are these parts assembled with a biscuit or dowel type setup?

I'd appreciate any input on this.
this might be late in the game, but I was taught by a guy that custom fits stocks for high end big game rifles. Every person in the class used two 1/4" dowels and tightbond 2 wood glue. none separated. we then clamped the stock in an engine lathe. you are joining two pieces end grain to end grain and you need the dowels to keep them together. a perfect fit is a must and clamping together is a must also.
 
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