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I need some advice. I've just reached the fifth firing in 40 of my Winchester .35Rem brass. I usually anneal bottleneck cases after the 5th, but this .35 brass has yet to even need trimming! It's been full-length sized before every reload but one, and in that instance it was neck sized.

It doesn;t seem the cartridge or the sizing makes the neck flow to any degree or it would need trimming. After every firing and sizing, the brass length measures between 1.903" and 1.910", and my Lee trim guage won;t even allow the cutter to touch the brass. I have had no splits in the neck nor any signs of head separation.

Given these circumstances, do you guys see any need to anneal? I've read where some of you .35 shooters have up to fifteen firings on their brass. Was there any annealing anywhere in there?

Thanks.
 

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In short, it sounds to me like you have a particulary good lot of brass. Just keep doing what your doing and enjoy shooting....

A
 

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I'd probably hit them with the torch. Just because they don't stretch doesn't mean they aren't work harderning, especially since you are FL sizing.
 

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Or you can dust the inside/outside of the case necks with Motor Mica and insert just the neck in a pot of molten lead at 875 degrees for a timed 5 seconds and anneal them that way. I have been using that method for over 25 years with nothing but outstanding results....

A
 

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Or you can dust the inside/outside of the case necks with Motor Mica and insert just the neck in a pot of molten lead at 875 degrees for a timed 5 seconds and anneal them that way. I have been using that method for over 25 years with nothing but outstanding results....

A
Do you quench them in water then? And what does the Motor Mica do?:confused:
 

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The quenching must be done regardless of the heating method, torch or molten lead. THe quenching reforms the metal's crystals, giving the right hardness.

If you use a torch, don't overheat. Do it in a dim room, and heat just enough to give a barely perceptible deep red glow. Bright red or orange is too hot. It will oversoften the brass so it won't hold the bullet properly.

With 8mm Mauser, I found that holding in the fingers was better than holding with pleiers. When the base is just getting uncomfortable, the neck is just the right temp, so toss 'em in the water.

I've never used the motor mica - maybe it helps to keep the lead from sticking to the brass like tinning with solder?

:)
 

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I use a MAPP torch and just rotate them a few seconds until they just start to turn and then dip them in water. It works just fine and no need to risk lead fumes in the house - its way too cold to do anything outside.
 

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The quenching is of no consequence whatsoever with copper-based alloys. While quenching can drastically alter the properties of steel and other metals, the main purpose when annealing is to stop the heat from altering the properties of the case head.

It's doubtful that enough heat from a case neck would soften a head, especially on a long rifle case, but better safe than sorry. Also prevents one from picking up a still-hot case later and burning the fingers... :eek:

It's the heating, not the cooling, that changes the copper-based alloys.
 

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35 Brass

Welcome to .35Cal. reloading . They just don't stretch like the smaller calibers . I've got .35Rem. brass that has been loaded a dozen times and trimmed once . I find the same to be true with my .358 Win. also . I you had a collett type neck sizing die they would probably last forever .
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Mike, I read the same thing in at least two different write-ups - that, when it comes to brass, quenching has no affect on the properties of the metal. Rather, it is done just to cool it for picking it up and to stop any transfer that might travel to the case body and head.

Is anyone annealing their .35Rem brass? I'm thinking that maybe with this 40 pieces I might just keep loading them until the necks split or I see signs of impending head separation. Or maybe at least until, like Matt says, the necks are too work-hardened to size enough to hold the bullets.

Oneoldsap, I do have a Lee collet die and have used it for one run of the 40 cases, and it really didn;t please me the loose way it tried to hold the bullets. I'll try it again with more "set" and see what happens.
 

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I use a lot of 35 Remy here on the farm, I anneal some where between 5 and 8 reloads, most of my loads are mild, some are not.

I use the torch and water bath method, have used it for many years never has failed me.

Jerry
 
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