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I just bought and used the Annealeez setup on my 8mm Gibbs cases, used the supplied 750 degree Tempilaq, about a count of 4-5 seemed right, See how it works. Did it after fire forming, it's when I got it. I may try annealing after forming, before fire forming and again after.
 

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Well, I've been reloading for a year now. I pick up brass in the field, and most of the 223 was annealed by the manufacture. I haven't kept track of how many times I reloaded the 223 brass, but lately the necks have split on a couple few. With the amount I'm able to collect I don't see a need to anneal that caliber. I thoroughly inspect each case during each process. I've 2 cases split from the side about midway down.

So, my question is; Is there a problem with reloading until they split then toss? I have about 6k cases.
 

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Okay, what about pistol brass? What if it gets slightly annealed. I mean to the point where it looks barely tarnished.
Load it? Will it split? Will it hold a boolit?
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Never heard of anyone annealing straight walled handgun brass. Left alone, it will split in time with usage. Small cases are cheap enough - when they split, toss and replace.
Is a "boolit" anything close to resembling a "bullet" ?
 
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And all this time I thought "boolit" was an intentional misspelling of the word "bullet", with the intent of giving the misspeller the appearance of having superior knowledge for erroneously attempting to establish a vocabulary spelling difference between a jacketed bullet and a cast bullet. And just when you thought you knew it all. Sheesh.
 
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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Been thinking of configuring the forum to automatically substitute 'bullet' for 'boolit' :p
 

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Been thinking of configuring the forum to automatically substitute 'bullet' for 'boolit' :p
Or just make it a cuss word. :D
 

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What you don't like "boolit"? Could start a protest.
I think it's perfect for holloween.
It may trick bots
 

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Been thinking of configuring the forum to automatically substitute 'bullet' for 'boolit' :p
Please don't. I was kicked off the cast boolit sight from calling a loading process dangerous or stupid. I did bring the spelling here for a while but found too many smart guys here. Many thought I was calling them personally but NO, it was what they did to scare me. Anyway I am hated at most places. Many real smart guys were booted from sites and I never find them again. The loss is a detriment to everyone. Near 70 years of loading safely when I seen guns destroyed makes me not condone anything dangerous. Everyone here is to care for. I say bullet now.

The most hurtful was being booted from a site I had not been on for 10 years. I tried to sign in and was told I was not allowed. Who goes in behind my back and gets me tossed? I had only one post in 10 years about alloy. I called Veral and he did not know. Came from higher up.
 

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Never heard of anyone annealing straight walled handgun brass. Left alone, it will split in time with usage. Small cases are cheap enough - when they split, toss and replace.
Is a "boolit" anything close to resembling a "bullet" ?
True. You need case tension. But still I am loading brass at 44 times. Bought in the early 80's.
 

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I have an annealer and it works pretty good..but annealing is a waste of my time, unless you have a caliber that uses hard to come by brass...Calibers like my 308, 30-06, 7x57, 375s, 338s etc. etc. brass is cheap and lasts 5 or 6 firings depending on loads..toss and buy anther 100 or two is my take on the annealing subject. Calibers that get annealing are my .348 Win. 25-35 Win., 38-40 Win and 8mm/06 Ackley that I anneal from time to time depending on availability etc. and that varies from year to year. but lately I have put up a store of brass from these calibers..

IMO you really have to shoot a lot to justify annealing, and it can be dangerous to the less initiated I suppose.
 

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Practical Annealing

Annealing extends case life, perhaps indefinitely, but most importantly it uniforms or baselines the hardness of all cases. Manufacturers anneal cases to polish away the resulting staining for cosmetic appeal.

As an engineer I can appreciate all the technical aspects of annealing, but PRACTICAL annealing is simple, effective and well established. Using a propane torch, heat the neck for a fixed time at a fixed distance. It is not even necessary to rotate the neck.

Use a simple jig or stand to positively position the case and torch. Establish the flame and time that quickly heats the neck area to just below color change in a darkened room , generally five seconds or less depending on case size. The case will stain slightly about 1/3rd the way down. This mark should be consistent as possible. I have purchased unpolished 223 cases with this identical staining. Air cool.

Special care/cooling is required for Hornet sized cases with thin walls.

Done properly there is no effect on the case head. Necks transform from hard/brittle to soft/malleable. This type of annealing should be done after sizing, otherwise it is possible if cases are over heated to collapse the neck until it is work hardened the first firing. I have routinely annealed thousands of rifle cases with this method without a neck split, a case failure, accuracy issues or reloading difficulties.

After five reloads, case necks become noticeably harder when resizing and is generally an optimum time to anneal. This is particularly noticeable when trimming or turning cases.

There is no objective evidence super technical annealing equipment or processes result in increased accuracy or case life over PRACTICAL annealing.

How hot is too hot? Ross Seyfried, a notable expert in old British large bore cartridges, published several annealing articles in prominent gun magazines years ago heating necks to cherry red with case heads cooled in water resulting in a distinct purple discoloration of the upper case to duplicate unpolished British factory ammunition. I have tried this technique with acceptable results, but it offers no advantages to lower temperatures and air cooling and necks are initially very soft.
 
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