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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought the XS Lever Scout mount for my 1895g. I'm wondering about the scope I bought for it. It's a Nikon 2x20 EER. It has an incredible amount of eye relief, (10.5-26.4 inches according to the box). Pardon my ignorance, but was this a good choice? Seems like the scope would be more at home sitting atop a big revolver. I have it mounted as far forward as it can go and still see the target image move as I move my eye around. I'm a big guy with a length of pull of 15" or so on my bolt rifles. Could the lop be a factor ? Maybe I should go with the "tape on the stock" routine to train my cheek? Or should I consider getting a different scope? What do you think?
 

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I have that same scope on my old Winchester.
I found out that the crosshair movement is associated with paralax. It may or may not actually be aproblem depending on target distance and viewing position..
It is prevalent in many scopes.
Only very expensive scopes like Zies and Schmidt-Bender have a design that eliminates this problem. They do it by etching the crosshair onto a different lens than what Nikon and Leupold do with theirs.
Bob Nisbet
 

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Lone Wattie:

The movement your seeing with the cross hairs of your scope is paralax.

I've heard where you can try adjusting the focus on your scope to help reduce the paralax problem, but chances are you'll still wind up seeing some of this paralax problem remaining no matter how much you adjust the scope.

The problems with paralax are usually in direct proportion to what we've paid for a scope.

Right off the top I wouldn't think that a Nikon scope would produce that much paralax when it gets right down to it, but all things being equal my 2X leopold shows a hint of paralax as well.

I'm sure this paralax problem has something to do with the high amount of eye relief these particular type of scopes have.

On those quick short range shots I don't think you'll experience much problems, but on the longer shots do try to center your eye with the target, and of course pre set your scope to centering on that same eye position.

Red dot's are all just fine, and I do really mean that to !!!

But when my eye's start to getting close to 100 yards that extra bit of magnification makes all the difference in the world.

Lever minded !!
 

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The more consistent your cheek weld is the less the paralax will effect your point of impact/point of aim shift. Try to zero your scope in the same position and with the same cheek weld you will hunt and your groups should be better than if you are trying to use the gun in many different possitions. When you shoot prone the angle of your eye to the eyepiece changes comparred to when you shoot with your head up from the bench. This is probably the most extreme change but each shooting position will cause a shift in this angle. This angle change will cause a shift in your POI. It is important to remember that the cross hairs in your scope are essentially a front sight. If your eye is not consitently in the same position it is like having a constantly shifting rear sight.

A pad on your stock may also help you achive a more consitent cheek weld.

If this were a variable power scope I would also say start shooting with the power dialed down to the minimum and shoot a group on each power setting and look for shifts in POI. If there is much of a shift return the scope because this type of shift can't be corrected with a simple technique.
 

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[still see the target image move as I move my eye around]

It's like when I told my Doctor that my knee hurt when I moved it a certain way - he told me: "Don't move it like that."

Don't move your head around, and the "problem" will not appear - a result of practicing to mount the gun the same way each time.

In my experiences with IER/pistol scopes used in the scout position, it's more important that the lower end of the eye relief window ( 10.5" to 26.4" in your example), the 10.5" distance built into that scope be far enough from your eye that you get a full sight picture with the gun mounted normally.

That full sight picture will not be available @ 9.5" or 10", for example - so you might want to have someone measure the eye relief on THAT scope on YOUR rifle when you hold it in the mounted position, and adjust the scope's forward/aft positioning as req'd.

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the input. Looks like what I need most is practice. But shooting that thing from a bench is a real bear. Right now I'm just trying work up decently accurate load for it...I'd be happy with 4" @ 100yds. and 2 aspirins.:D
 

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Only the most expensive scopes have a parallax adjustment option. But when I was looking at lower power Bushnell scopes I called the factory and found out that the factory sets the handgun scopes to be parallax free at 50 or 75 yards Most rifle scopes have the parallax set at 100 yards or more.

You may be using the scope at ranges past the parallax setting for your scope, and getting the movement of the reticle.
 
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