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Seems we've been shaken around a little more than usual lately. About 2 weeks ago we had an earthquake that measured 6.7 and today we had one about an hour ago that shook pretty good. Preliminary magnitude of 7.5. I've not heard any reports of damage, but there was a lot of shaking and rattling.
 

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From the Daily News

Large earthquake rattles Alaska
Preliminary magnitude set at 7.5


Daily News staff

(Published: November 3, 2002)
A large earthquake shook Interior and Southcentral Alaska Sunday afternoon.

The preliminary magnitude was 7.5, according to the West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center. The quake was centered about 90 miles south of Fairbanks.

The center said the quake would not generate a damaging tsunami, but some sea level changes may be noticed along the West Coast.
 

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Hope you and the Mrs. are well, that large of a quake, can't help but be damage someplace. Take care, keep us posted as to needs you may have.
 

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More on the earthquake. From the Daily News.

Earthquake opens cracks in highways, topples fuel tanks
7.9-magnitude shaker hits 90 miles south of Fairbanks


By Dan Joling
Associated Press writer

(Published: November 3, 2002)
A major earthquake rocked a sparsely populated area of interior Alaska early Sunday afternoon, cracking highways and roads, knocking over fuel tanks and shaking rural homes.

Bruce Turner of the West Coast and Alaska and Tsunami Warning Center in Palmer said the magnitude 7.9 quake hit at 1:13 p.m Alaska Standard Time and was centered 90 miles south of Fairbanks.

"It shook for a good 30 seconds," he said.

The quake was felt strongly in Anchorage about 270 miles south of the epicenter.

The earthquake occurred on the Denali Fault and had a shallow depth, said John Lahr, geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo. Shallow earthquakes generally are felt over a wider area.

"We expected this would have surface rupture that geologists could see on the ground and study," he said.

The earthquake did not generate a tsunami considered damaging to Alaska, western states or Canada, Turner said.

Alaska State Troopers had received no reports of injuries 90 minutes after the quake but were responding to damaged highways.

Lt. Lee Farmer said a 3-foot crack opened up in one lane of the George Parks Highway, the main road between Fairbanks and Anchorage. A trooper was on the scene and a state Department of Transportation crew was on its way to assess damage.

"Anybody with one of those lowriders out of Anchorage probably doesn't want to head that way," Farmer said.

Troopers also responded to damage reports on the Alaska Highway near Northway, 256 miles southeast of Fairbanks, and the Richardson Highway near Paxson, 178 miles south of Fairbanks, where a 3-4-foot crack closed the highway, said Transportation Department spokeswoman Shannon McCarthy. She said repair crews hoped to have it opened within four hours.

Residents of the Tok Cutoff, which leads from the Alaska Highway to Southcentral highways connected to Anchorage, said the quake knocked over fuel tanks.

In Slana, which has no electric utility, families use diesel fuel to power generators. Sharrel Webster said without help in setting her family's fuel tanks upright, she was likely to lose food in her freezer.

A semitrailer the family uses for storage was pushed over.

"It's laying on it side," she said. The well casing on the family's well lifted 2 inches out of the ground and cracks opened up so wide that she could stick her hand them.

Randy Schmoker, a metal worker in Porcupine Creek on the Tok Cutoff, was in his shop when he felt the ground move.

"I thought, 'Oh good, an earthquake,' and then it got worse and worse," he said.

The quake tipped over a band saw and other heavy tools, his 300-gallon outside fuel tank and moved a 150-pound anvil 20 feet across the floor.

He stepped outside and saw the tops of trees whipping 20 to 30 feet back and forth. He said he expected the ground to crack open after a series of 8-inch waves spread out before him.

"They looked like ocean waves," he said.

An hour after the quake, aftershocks were still moving the ground every five minutes. Schmoker said he's a big game hunter and usually enjoys short earthquakes.

"A charging brown bear I can handle," he said. "This scared the **** out of me."

Jay Capps, who owns a small grocery store midway between Tok and Glennallen, said he felt a low-level shaking for 15 or 20 seconds and then two "good-sized pops" before the earthquake hit.

He and two other people ran from the store.

"You actually felt the earthquake coming," Capps said. "It shook so bad you could not stand up on the front porch."

He watched as a five-ton U-haul in the store parking lot sat rocking by itself. "It sounded like the trees were breaking roots under the ground," he said.

Capps' wife, Debbie, was upstairs when the earthquake hit. She grabbed the china hutch and saved it from falling over, but an entertainment center with 26-inch television was destroyed.

Capps said nearly everything fell off store shelves.

"My store smells like liquid smoke, picante sauce and mayonnaise," he said.
 

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Alyeska, know what your going through.Was stationed on midway Is. when the big one hit Valdez. Water dropped about 10 feet in the harbor, gave everybody a scare. Was stationed in Guam when a 7.5 hit, chased furniture all over the house. Was in San Francisco when the one hit there (not 1906) and part of the bay bridge caved in behind me. Brings a new meaning to the term Haul A_ _. Like Joel B said hope you and yours are ok, and ifin you need will be willing to do what I can from here, this applies to other members and their families and others that need.

Gun Runner
 

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Still more news...
http://www.adn.com/front/story/2071579p-2169367c.html
Earthquake opens cracks in highways, topples fuel tanks
7.9-magnitude shaker shuts down oil pipeline, injures man

Alaska quake felt in Louisiana

By Dan Joling
Associated Press writer

(Published: November 3, 2002)

Traffic travels on the shoulder of the Parks Highway about 10 miles north of Healy to avoid a U-shaped crack that ripped across the road during the 7.9-magnitude earthquake that shook the area Sunday. (Photo by Jimmy Tohill)


Kirk Mercer slows traffic on the approach to a crack that crossed the Parks Highway 10 miles north of Healy after an 7.9-magnitude earthquake hit the area Sunday. ( Photo by Jimmy Tohill)

Diane Marshall answers phones at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks as seismographs record earthquake data, Sunday in Fairbanks. A major earthquake rocked a sparsely populated area of interior Alaska early Sunday afternoon, cracking highways and roads, knocking over fuel tanks and shaking rural homes. The magnitude 7.9 quake, centered 90 miles south of Fairbanks, was strongly felt in Anchorage about 270 miles to the south. ( John Hagen / Associated Press Photo)

A major earthquake rocked a sparsely populated area of Interior Alaska early Sunday afternoon, cracking highways and roads, knocking over fuel tanks and shaking rural homes.

Bruce Turner of the West Coast and Alaska and Tsunami Warning Center in Palmer said the magnitude 7.9 quake hit at 1:13 p.m Alaska Standard Time and was centered 90 miles south of Fairbanks.

"It shook for a good 30 seconds," he said.

The quake was felt strongly in Anchorage about 270 miles south of the epicenter.

The quake triggered the trans-Alaska pipeline's automatic detection system, said Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. spokesman Mike Heatwole. Operators then manually shut the pipeline down shortly after 2 p.m.

Heatwole said helicopters were flying the length of the 800-mile pipeline and ground crews are physically inspecting for damage. No damage has been detected at 4 p.m.

The earthquake occurred on the Denali Fault and had a shallow depth, said John Lahr, geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo. Shallow earthquakes generally are felt over a wider area.

"We expected this would have surface rupture that geologists could see on the ground and study," he said.

The earthquake did not generate a tsunami considered damaging to Alaska, western states or Canada, Turner said.

Alaska State Troopers received a report of one injury. Spokesman Greg Wilkinson said a man in Mentasta broke his arm after slipping on stairs during the quake. He said a Mentasta apartment building also was evacuated and occupants were gathering at the school because of a gas smell.

Trooper Lt. Lee Farmer said a 3-foot crack opened up in one lane of the George Parks Highway, the main road between Fairbanks and Anchorage. A trooper was on the scene and a state Department of Transportation crew was on its way to assess damage.

"Anybody with one of those lowriders out of Anchorage probably doesn't want to head that way," Farmer said.

Troopers also responded to damage reports on the Alaska Highway near Northway, 256 miles southeast of Fairbanks, and the Richardson Highway near Paxson, 178 miles south of Fairbanks, where a 3-4 foot crack closed the highway, said Transportation Department spokeswoman Shannon McCarthy. She said repair crews hoped to have it opened within four hours.

Residents of the Tok Cutoff, which leads from the Alaska Highway to Southcentral highways connected to Anchorage, said the quake knocked over fuel tanks.

In Slana, which has no electric utility, families use diesel fuel to power generators. Sharrel Webster said without help in setting her family's fuel tanks upright, she was likely to lose food in her freezer.

A semitrailer the family uses for storage was pushed over.

"It's laying on it side," she said. The well casing on the family's well lifted 2 inches out of the ground and cracks opened up so wide that she could stick her hand them.

Randy Schmoker, a metal worker in Porcupine Creek on the Tok Cutoff, was in his shop when he felt the ground move.

"I thought, 'Oh good, an earthquake,' and then it got worse and worse," he said.

The quake tipped over a band saw and other heavy tools, his 300-gallon outside fuel tank and moved a 150-pound anvil 20 feet across the floor.

He stepped outside and saw the tops of trees whipping 20 to 30 feet back and forth. He said he expected the ground to crack open after a series of 8-inch waves spread out before him.

"They looked like ocean waves," he said.

An hour after the quake, aftershocks were still moving the ground every five minutes. Schmoker said he's a big game hunter and usually enjoys short earthquakes.

"A charging brown bear I can handle," he said. "This scared the **** out of me."

Jay Capps, who owns a small grocery store midway between Tok and Glennallen, said he felt a low-level shaking for 15 or 20 seconds and then two "good-sized pops" before the earthquake hit.

He and two other people ran from the store.

"You actually felt the earthquake coming," Capps said. "It shook so bad you could not stand up on the front porch."

He watched as a 5-ton U-haul in the store parking lot sat rocking by itself. "It sounded like the trees were breaking roots under the ground," he said.

Capps' wife, Debbie, was upstairs when the earthquake hit. She grabbed the china hutch and saved it from falling over, but an entertainment center with 26-inch television was destroyed.

Capps said nearly everything fell off store shelves.

"My store smells like liquid smoke, picante sauce and mayonnaise," he said.

Karen Eldridge, who owns the Paxson Lodge with her husband Chester, said she also knew an earthquake was on its way.

"I heard it coming. A big thud. A great big thud and then I looked at my plant and it was shaking and I says 'Here it comes."'

"We all ran outside and was waiting out there for it to quit and it kept going and going and going and going, and then it hit again. We had three big jolts ... I held onto a big post."

Liquor bottles broke in the bar. Glasses on the bar smashed to the floor. Pictures flew off the walls. Oil in the fryer sloshed onto the kitchen floor.

Eldridge said she isn't going to venture into the storage room until tomorrow to see what kind of damage is in there.

"We have a big mess," she said.

The earthquake was the second major episode in Interior Alaska in the last two weeks. A magnitude 6.7 earthquake centered about 30 miles southeast of Denali National Park hit at 3:27 a.m. Oct. 23.

Earlier Sunday, a magnitude 4.0 earthquake centered 73 miles east of Denali Park hit at 9:47 a.m.
 

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Felt in Louisana....

Alaska quake felt in Louisiana


Earthquake opens cracks in highways, topples fuel tanks

The Associated Press

(Published: November 3, 2002)
New Orleans -- People here saw water in ponds, bayous and pools slosh about from what geophysicists say was caused by the awesome power of an earthquake in Alaska Sunday, over 3,000 miles away.

A 7.9 magnitude earthquake rocked a remote area of interior Alaska early Sunday afternoon, cracking highways and roads, knocking over fuel tanks and shaking rural homes.

"When you have an earthquake of this size, it generates what we call surface waves which are energy that travel through the earth's crust and these waves cause disturbances that can be looked upon as ripples or disturbances" in water, said Dale Grant, a geophysicist with U.S. Geological Survey's National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colo.

In Mandeville, across Lake Pontchartrain from New Orleans, Carol Barcia, 47, was sitting with neighbors on the deck of her house around 5 p.m. when she saw boats bounce around.

"We were just sitting outside on our back deck, just relaxing, and we noticed the sail boats started leaning over, going back and forth, and the boats' lines were just banging up and down. My boat was banging up against the dock. My neighbor's boat broke a line," Barcia said.

"One poor guy across the canal from us fell off his sail boat," Barcia, a pharmaceutical representative, said.

She said a neighbor rode a boat over Bayou Castine and helped the man out of the water.

Similar stories were reported in other states, Grant said.

It was a shallow earthquake — centered about 6 miles underground -- and such earthquakes are generally felt over a wider area, Grant said.

"This earthquake was shallow and the energy went directly into the surface and that is what causes these affects so far away," he said.

Grant said he received calls from nuclear power facilities in various states -- including Minnesota and Washington -- that reported unusual water movement.

He said an Oklahoma state geologist also reported that farmers there noticed water in ponds sloshed about.

And throughout the New Orleans area people were baffled and frightened by what they saw.

"My neighbors whistled -- they've got a pond right on the levee on the Mississippi River -- and that thing was churning, swirling and splashing out," said Dan Musmanno, a 51-year-old program manager at Northrop Grumman Corp.

"And they said my pond was doing the same thing. And it was. The water looked like it was coming up 7 or 8 inches, and the pool was splashing out as well," said Musmanno, who lives in Belle Chasse, a New Orleans suburb.

"My neighbor actually thought there was an alligator in the pond. My neighbor's son went out there and said, 'It ain't no alligator,'" Musmanno said. "The water was going back and forth for about a half hour. It was kind of spooky."

The earthquake, centered 90 miles south of Fairbanks, hit at 1:13 p.m. Alaska Standard Time, or 4:13 p.m. in Louisiana, said Bruce Turner of Alaska and Tsunami Warning Center.

Alaska State Troopers received a report of one injury. Spokesman Greg Wilkinson said a man in Mentasta broke his arm after slipping on stairs during the quake.

The earthquake occurred on the Denali Fault and had a shallow depth, said John Lahr, geophysicist at the National Earthquake Information Center.

It is not uncommon for a major earthquake to shake waters hundreds of miles away, Grant said.

"It's just a feature of how energy travels through the earth and it goes to show how powerful that earthquake this was."

The earthquake's strength was no mystery to Paul Martin, Barcia's 59-year-old neighbor in Mandeville.

An iron cleat bolted to his pier he ties his boat to was pulled out when his boat got tossed around.

"The boat started moving, it was being tossed around, up and down, sideways, and it pulled one of the cleats out of the pier," he said.

"At first I thought it was a boat going by, but then I realized a wake wouldn't do that, and I didn't know what it could be," he said. "It was quite a sight. All the boats up and down this bayou were being tossed around like little boats in a bathtub."
 

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All of this sounds kind of scary, and it did shake. Girdwood is southeast of Anchorage, so I didn't get the full effect, like say Coldfingers did. No ill effects other than the stories posted above are floating around here. Just a curtesory story on the news this evening. I had stuff rattled around pretty good here, a little glass broken, but nothing major. No tsunami warnings issued. Girdwood was devasted by the 9.2 quake in 1964 as was Valdez and old Chenega. The towns of Girdwood and Valdez had to be moved to higher ground because of the devastation. Alaska records over 2,000 measureable earthquakes a year (2.5 or better).

Hoping we hear from Coldfingers as his area was much closer to the epicenter. I haven't heard any real damage reports though other than what I posted above.
 

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Just heard on the 10 p.m. news that 3 of the 5 or so major roadways in Alaska suffered enormous damage. The Parks Highway, the Richardson and the Tok Cutoff all suffered cracks and displacement. Some elevation changes as much 4 feet. The Trans-Alaska Oil Pipeline suffered some damage, but no oil spills are reported. Several mudslides and landslides have been reported. Geologists are going to map the displacement beginning tomorrow. They expect it will take eastward into Canada.

Coldfingers, my thoughts are with you and yours, I do hope you are okay up there.

The company I work for has some contacts in Delta Junction and I will hear more tomorrow.
 

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alyeska, living in the sierras in No. Cal we had a Major power dip here when the quake hit. Was just looking at the Earth Quake map and in the last 3 days: 7.9 Alaska, 5.1 Vanuatu Is., 7.5 Indonesia, 5.5 andaman Is. (india region), 6.1 E. coast of honshu japan, 5.0 E. hokkaido japan, 4.0 Nebraska, a long string of 3 & 4's in So. Cal, 2's and 3's along the Cal Nv boarder, Utah a string of 2's and 3's starting in the lower left of the state to the upper right of the state. Ifin this activity causes Dinosaurs to come back(like in the movies) what Cal Rifle am I gonna need for them? :D

Gun Runner
 

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Saw a post from Coldfingers (Scotty) on the Sixguns forum re: the earthquake, so looks like he made it OK.
 
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