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Yup, there I was, again, confronted with another dilemma. It started when I caught my neighbor feeding his feral cats and 'the possum'. I have two small Pomeranian dogs, like many things, they ain't real bright. But, me and the wife are attached to them. A four foot chain link fence is all that separates my dawgs from the possum. The 'tail' begins below:

Ok, grabbed Momma's Marlin 39 and loaded up with CCI 'quiet rounds', five of them. It was only one possum. I positioned myself carefully in the pre-built 34' x 12' possum blind with a good view of 'possum territory'. For two days I waited and nuthin. Not knowing the legality of hunting/murdering a possum with dawgs? I released the 'hounds from hades', known as 'Rascal and Pepper'. Quickly, they were on the scent. The trail led to my tool storage building, 8' x 12' and located in front of my possum blind and the door was ajar. I quickly set my coffee cup down, hollered for Momma to bring the 'light' and a plan was formed.

Momma put the dawgs/hounds inside the house. Knowing that the original battle plan had changed from a sniping mission to close quarters combat, I changed out the .22 quiet ammo for .22 Stingers as a wild possum charge seemed imminent. We then carefully entered the building, no possum in sight, yet? I heard a noise under my tool bin? I told Momma to shine the light underneath there? She promptly told me that she wasn't gonna get on the D**n Floor with a possum. So, I poked the rifle barrel into the dark corner. I heard a hiss and then all hades broke loose, an explosion of gray fur erupted forth, in my face. It ran out of the building. Momma was yelling "don't shoot, its a cat". It was, I didn't.
Momma told me that she was through hunting with me. The 'tail' continues....

Ten hours later, after being abandoned by my spouse, sitting alone in my possum blind, in the dark, the possum was spotted. He emerged from the dark, about 20 meters/yards away, my heart was pounding as I levered a round into the chamber, then the earlier PTSD set in. That's Possum Traumatic Stress Disorder. Then the possum disappeared into the darkness, allowing me to compose myself and dry my sweaty hands. Fifteen minutes later, with my nerves calmed, he reappeared, one shot was fired, one possum fell and this 'tail' has ended.

Hope folks had fun reading this, it's basically true.
 

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To my way of thinking, you shot the wrong varmint. Possums eat grub worms and moles but aren't destructive at it like armadillos are. Feral cats are the plague of N. America.
BTW- If a possum shows any fight at all, it's very short-lived. He'll curl up and play dead. Very convincing act....after he's shot.

My dogs occasionally 'tree' a bird or packrat that gets in the house. Last week they 'treed' a weasel, still snow white, under the bandsaw. That explains the occasional mouse tail I see in prominent places, like the middle of the stairs. I've been 'notified' the weasel is taking care of business.
 

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but aren't destructive at it like armadillos are.
Have you got armadillos up your way? If so, about when did they arrive? Seems like we've only had them in Tennessee since maybe the 90's. Fire ants seemed to arrive about the same time. Amazing how things like that migrate over such distances.
 

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No armadillos....yet. Idaho is blessed with targets that bask in the sun on rock piles instead of scurry around in the middle of the night. They infested N. Florida just as I was leaving in '76. Coyotes were close behind.
Very interesting map of the fire ant infestation. They arrived in Mobile Alabama in 1930.
Map of progress since
 

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Last summer, we endured a dead possum under the house for a couple of months. It ain't no fun. We live out in the country lots of rats and mice. Yearly, poison is thrown under the house. Everybody has to do it. I'll admit to having a momentary twinge of guilt after doing the deed. Then, I remember last summer. Possum Kingdom, no mas.
 

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No armadillos....yet. Idaho is blessed with targets that bask in the sun on rock piles
Misunderstood your post #2. Maybe yall will never get armadillos or fire ants up there. Great map that you shared. Very much enjoyed looking at it.
 

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The odd thing about armadillos is they seemed to come north, up the Florida peninsula instead of from the west along the Gulf coast. Coyotes were common in N. Georgia and Alabama and seemed to have migrated south into Florida. It was always thought distemper and mange would prevent coyotes from the Southeast but it didn't work. They adapted and even lost their long hair!
 

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Blackhawk-- My family was 'in agriculture' in the '50 when Fire Ants hit Florida. My cousin was County Agent west by two counties and kept us abreast of ants creeping eastward. It was noted, they slowed in sand and leapt ahead in red clay. As 4-Hers, we traveled our county looking for Fire Ants. Just as the screw worm was finally eradicated a new pest shows up to kill game and farm animals alike. It's always something!
Had we known how much fun it was to cast their beds in aluminum, they would have been slowed more! (check ebay for fire ant castings)
 

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Had we known how much fun it was to cast their beds in aluminum, they would have been slowed more! (check ebay for fire ant castings)
Yes, I have seen those and watched several youtube videos of people casting them. Cool. Fire ants are doing a number on gator populations. They began building their mounds on top of gator nests and when the baby gators hatch, they have to "swim up" through millions of ants. Many baby gators are killed before they can escape the nest.
 

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Yup, there I was, again, confronted with another dilemma. It started when I caught my neighbor feeding his feral cats and 'the possum'. I have two small Pomeranian dogs, like many things, they ain't real bright. But, me and the wife are attached to them. A four foot chain link fence is all that separates my dawgs from the possum. The 'tail' begins below:

Ok, grabbed Momma's Marlin 39 and loaded up with CCI 'quiet rounds', five of them. It was only one possum. I positioned myself carefully in the pre-built 34' x 12' possum blind with a good view of 'possum territory'. For two days I waited and nuthin. Not knowing the legality of hunting/murdering a possum with dawgs? I released the 'hounds from hades', known as 'Rascal and Pepper'. Quickly, they were on the scent. The trail led to my tool storage building, 8' x 12' and located in front of my possum blind and the door was ajar. I quickly set my coffee cup down, hollered for Momma to bring the 'light' and a plan was formed.

Momma put the dawgs/hounds inside the house. Knowing that the original battle plan had changed from a sniping mission to close quarters combat, I changed out the .22 quiet ammo for .22 Stingers as a wild possum charge seemed imminent. We then carefully entered the building, no possum in sight, yet? I heard a noise under my tool bin? I told Momma to shine the light underneath there? She promptly told me that she wasn't gonna get on the D**n Floor with a possum. So, I poked the rifle barrel into the dark corner. I heard a hiss and then all hades broke loose, an explosion of gray fur erupted forth, in my face. It ran out of the building. Momma was yelling "don't shoot, its a cat". It was, I didn't.
Momma told me that she was through hunting with me. The 'tail' continues....

Ten hours later, after being abandoned by my spouse, sitting alone in my possum blind, in the dark, the possum was spotted. He emerged from the dark, about 20 meters/yards away, my heart was pounding as I levered a round into the chamber, then the earlier PTSD set in. That's Possum Traumatic Stress Disorder. Then the possum disappeared into the darkness, allowing me to compose myself and dry my sweaty hands. Fifteen minutes later, with my nerves calmed, he reappeared, one shot was fired, one possum fell and this 'tail' has ended.

Hope folks had fun reading this, it's basically true.
Be Advised shoot very carefully if you plan to take on feral felines in the future.
They are very hard to kill with a .22 and scream like nothing you ever heard after the first round this is something I have heard I do not shoot erant felines as they will arrest you for that here. Worse crime than kidnapping babies.
Islander
 

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Be Advised shoot very carefully if you plan to take on feral felines in the future.
They are very hard to kill with a .22 and scream like nothing you ever heard after the first round this is something I have heard I do not shoot erant felines as they will arrest you for that here. Worse crime than kidnapping babies.
Islander
Personal experience, always shoot cats in the chest/heart region with a .22, they go quiet and never far. Head shots just flood them with adrenaline if you don't drill the brain directly and the skull on a bigger cat can stop or deflect lighter bullets, and at that point they'll make it a long way in a hurry. Can attract attention. Unless you can use a Hornet or Triple 2. 😁
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I pretty much live out in the country. I do have neighbors. I have a large backyard deck, fenced backyard with a 4 foot locked chain link fence around it all. I don't hunt anymore and I really don't like to kill critters. I shoot the occasional stubborn stray or loose dog, with an old pump action Daisy BB gun, in the buttocks. It works, they move on.

What you said got me thinking, that in the last ten years, I've killed, one shot each, four possums and about seven feral cats. I used three .22 Stingers rounds and the rest were .22 short CB caps. Every time, I kept a low profile. No critter made any noise. All were DRT. The largest critter I ever killed with a .22 Short CB cap was a 70 pound pitbull that jumped my fence in Houston and was mauling my Labrador puppy. One shot, deliberately in the lungs, range forty yards, No bark, turned, jumped my fence, ran fifty yards and dropped dead. I would hope, I never have to kill anything again other'n golf balls, tin cans and time. BTW, golf balls and .22's are a hoot.

I wrote this little story, because for reasons unknown to me, I felt a pang of regret. I wanted in a way to make 'light' of it. I never shot a critter when I was on duty. Wish, with all my heart, I could say the same about the 'animals' I encountered.
 

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To my way of thinking, you shot the wrong varmint. Possums eat grub worms and moles but aren't destructive at it like armadillos are. Feral cats are the plague of N. America.
BTW- If a possum shows any fight at all, it's very short-lived. He'll curl up and play dead. Very convincing act....after he's shot
That's what I'm thinkin happened here. Either that or that possum wasn't as tough as the ones that's I've shot round here. They'll soak up 44's like no tomorrow😆
 

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when I was a teen in OK possum and armadillo was high on my list of things to shoot on sight but then I learned that possum would kill and eat snakes and rattlers bites didn't hurt them much. I stopped shooting possum after that
 

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To my way of thinking, you shot the wrong varmint.
I agree. Shoot the feral cat(s). Not only will they leave "presents" in your yard that your dogs would love to eat and later throw up on your carpet, but if you like having wild birds in your yard, they are going to become dinner for the feral cat(s).
 

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Having grown up a deep south country boy who is now in his mid 60s and still a deep south country boy living waaaaay out in the country ... I can relate to this thread in so many ways. Chicken houses all around us (our houses were 10k birds as a kid now they are 50k per house) .... but the feral cats, eagles, snakes and hawks (and to some degree the poison) help to control the mice and rats. It's the yotes we have a problem with.

Here in SC the yotes came east across the Mississippi (via the bridges) in the late 70s, early 80s and invaded Mississippi, Tennessee and Alabama and then quickly moved into Georgia, South Carolina and Western North Carolina although we have them bad here in South Carolina ... they had hit us full-on by the early to mid 90s.

The yotes do far more damage to the quail and turkey (and your domestic dogs and livestock) than do the feral cats imho ... and I'm no cat lover by any stretch of the imagination. To the contrary, I have three dogs who eat cats for snacks. But the yotes do damage to everything and we hunt them unmercifully 24/7/365.

Now, we've got all your various snakes too right down to eastern corals and diamondbacks but the most prominent are your standard fare cottonmouths and your timber rattlers (around here we call'em cane breaks, red stripe and all) plus plenty of king snakes and black racers, rat snakes, Gardner snakes, etc. Again, the feral cats eat those too as do the possums, eagles, hawks, etc. Can't say I've ever seen a yote running with a snake in its mouth but I can say I've seen the wild pigs (which we also hunt unmercifully 24/7/365) go after snakes with a vigor. They even seem immune to the rattlers and cotton mouths.

We do have armadillos now ... they started showing-up about 10 years ago.

As far as fireants go they've been around as long as I can remember. I stepped in a pile of them as a toddler so that had to be '57, '58 or so ... still remember it to this day.
 
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