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I need to pull down some old Greek surplus ammo and replace the powder. I had thought to pull the bullets, neck size, replace powder with new, and re-seat a bullet. Is this something you all would not do? Would you want to replace the primers, too?
 

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I would, pull the bullets, empty the powder, and fire a half dozen.
If they go bang, I wouldn't worry much about it.
 
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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Don't know when the Greeks switched to non-corrosive primers, but they're berdan type, anyway. Heck of a job removing unless you have the proper decapping tools. Think I'd leave them if they test fire OK and just make sure to flush everything with hot soapy water afterwards.
 

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I agree it is not impossible for them to be corrosive; just not very likely in 1980. Boiling water down the tube will pretty well guarantee that if they are corrosive, you will have dissolved the potassium chloride residue. Just in case any of that salt is hiding under some powder fouling, follow that cleaning up with Bore Tech Eliminator, which has a very effective corrosion inhibitor, (so effective that even though Eliminator is water-based, you can let it dry out in a bore without any rusting going on) or wait for it to dry completely and run a patch through that is wet with a corrosion inhibiting oil, like LPS-2.
 
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Not a pro at Greek ammo....but I remeber the stuff.
Were selling it reasonably priced...maybe still are...anything from 1960's to early 1980's,often in mixed lots. Remmeber just a few years back were still selling spam-cans of the ammo.
U.S. gave them a bunch of Garands and set them up for loading ammo...they kept using those rifles for a long long time. They may have (likely did) have other ammo makers besides what we set them up with.

The HXP headstamped ones are likely boxer primed/noncorrosibve (the ones I shot were).

Am thinking I'd try some before I messed around with them....maybe try the primed cases first. Smokless poweder doesn't normally get more powerful with age,but it pays to be careful.

If they pass,,,no hang fires,,,....likely time to shoot them rather than try to revive them.
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HAve had well kept ammo from WWII-1920's work fine (Surprised me)..and poorly kept ammo from the 1990's be duds....you just never know, although you can guess by the outside look of the ammo and packaging if the storage was horrible.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
This ammo (HXP from ~68-73) is boxer primed and CMP said it was non-corrosive when I got it from them.

Regrettably, I haven’t been able to keep this ammo in a cool environment for much of the past 8-10 years. It’s been hot. So that plus age makes me wary of firing it. Some of the data (such as that from Norma, I think, but don’t quote me as that’s just a loose recollection) about old smokeless indicates that one of its decay modes can be that although bullet speed from an old cartridge goes down, peak pressure might actually be higher than when new. That’s a problem I don’t have a good way to test for since I don’t plan to mess up my M1’s stock in order to rig up a strain gauge for the Pressure Trace.

All of this is why I figured to pull down and discard the powder, but thought I’d ask about the primers, too. There isn’t much I can do about the storage conditions for the ammo or primers.
 

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It depends what you prefer. I have collected empty HXP cases at the local gun club and reloaded them. The old primers were replaced. So it depends. All the best...
Gil
 

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BTDT with some HXP surplus (can't remember headstamp age but I purchased it 9 years ago from CMP for my Garand. Used stock primed brass with IMR 4865 and Hornady 155 gr bullets. All fired quite well (no squibs, no "hang fires")...
 

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There is a powder deterioration mode the U.S. Navy studied by heating ball powder-charged M80 to, IIRC, 140° for six months. They found the firing peak pressure had increased from about 48 kCUP to 70-something kCUP. I can find the exact numbers if they matter. It turned out deterioration had destroyed the powder's deterrent faster than its nitrocellulose, turning the charge into the equivalent of a smaller charge of a much faster burning powder. That caused the high peak, even though the remaining NC didn't make enough gas to get the bullet to the same velocity.

Pull the powder and look at it. Greasy or oily looking, dump it. Smells like nitric acid, dump it. Leaves red dust behind after pouring it off a white sheet of paper, dump it. Verdigris on the bullet base or inside the case, dump it. Otherwise, it may be OK.

The first pure synthesis of Lead Styphnate for primer production was in 1954 (less pure forms were used prior to that) and made it much easier to achieve totally reliable non-corrosive primers that aged well. If we taught the Greeks to make ammo after that date, it is almost certain they will use non-corrosive priming.
 
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