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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As some may know, I recently bought my first AR-15, Armalite for real. I'm also a bit of a prepper as well and try to have backups just in case the internet isn't a option. Plus, I do like to thumb through books, even if I rarely read one cover to cover.

What I'm looking for. Something that can walk through a complete disassembly down to nothing but parts, even the smallest of parts. Then a complete putting it back together, pictures would be really nice but also detailed text. I've found some that based on reviews have that part but are missing the next part. I'd also like a really nice troubleshooting section that covers just about anything that can go wrong. Think about the Haynes books for cars and the troubleshooting section it has. It doesn't have to be just like that but something that when there is a problem, I can go to it and figure out what the causes can be.

I dug around on Amazon and did some google searches. The books I've found have reviews that says the info in them is dated or the books just aren't that good. One it seems was written during the assault weapon ban which means a lot of things wasn't covered since you couldn't get certain things at the time. It sounds like a good book but won't contain some info because of the time it was written. The newer version doesn't include some info either, more about history according to the reviews. I'm just not finding what I'm looking for on my own.

Does such a book exist? Is this going to require more than one book? Do I need to buy a printer and print out a book from somewhere?

Thanks for any ideas. Hopefully someone here has a book they can recommend.
 

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I wonder about books being “dated” on this subject. Are they really dated, or do they just not address the latest bolt on gimmicks? The basic AR is pretty much the same old system as far as the basic build is concerned.

I’m not a rabid fan but this is one of the books I have, and it reads well and I think it will fill the bill for your wants. The same guy wrote another book concerning custom/competition builds that I liked.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/5...volume-2-book-by-walt-kuleck-with-clint-mckee
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I wonder about books being “dated” on this subject. Are they really dated, or do they just not address the latest bolt on gimmicks? The basic AR is pretty much the same old system as far as the basic build is concerned.

I’m not a rabid fan but this is one of the books I have, and it reads well and I think it will fill the bill for your wants. The same guy wrote another book concerning custom/competition builds that I liked.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/5...volume-2-book-by-walt-kuleck-with-clint-mckee
I was thinking they may not have changed much either but the things we can add on have which I find interesting. ARs it seems have come a long ways over the years. I found the one you linked to and it was on my 'give it a try' list but I was hoping someone who has bought a few books would come along and share some thoughts. I read reviews but few write reviews the way I do. When I write a review, I generally share some details about what is in it. I've done that with gardening books and such. It helps others to know just what the book has in it.

One thing about the link you have, there are different versions of the book. Which version was causing me some pause. I might add, your link is a bit cheaper plus I may buy some more spare parts as well. lol

While I'd like a troubleshooting section, it may not be needed. I do fairly well with mechanical stuff. If it doesn't eject right, likely a ejector problem. If the spent cartridge stays in the chamber, likely a extractor problem. Some problems point themselves. One thing I don't know how to recognize is a gas problem. To much or to little can cause problems that may be confusing. I have no idea how one fixes such a problem, unless it is just something stopped up or something.

Unless someone comes up with a better one, that will likely be the one I go with. At least I know which version of that book comes recommended. :D
 

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“One thing I don't know how to recognize is a gas problem. To much or to little can cause problems that may be confusing. I have no idea how one fixes such a problem, unless it is just something stopped up or something. “

Yes, particularly if you fool around with esoteric loads or buy a .300 Blackout and shoot subsonic. The only answer I know is to install an adjustable gas block. There may be other options. I’m not an expert here.
 
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While I'd like a troubleshooting section, it may not be needed. I do fairly well with mechanical stuff. If it doesn't eject right, likely a ejector problem. If the spent cartridge stays in the chamber, likely a extractor problem. Some problems point themselves. One thing I don't know how to recognize is a gas problem. To much or to little can cause problems that may be confusing. I have no idea how one fixes such a problem, unless it is just something stopped up or something.
If you use them enough, and are actually mechanically inclined, gas issues are self evident; or at least the second option.
IME, and especially when dealing with the popular "carbine" versions that all the cool kids like; gas system issues are more typically the problem than an extractor/ejector.

Over-gassing causes violent bolt travel, and if severe enough, the bolt will rip away from the case head. Essentially the brass is still "sealed" to the chamber when it begins trying to extract the case. Typically this is a issue with the gas port being too large. Undergassing produces the opposite result, typically will short-stroke the bolt. For the masses who don't shoot, it is typically from too small of a port, or a burr in the port. It certainly can be from a plugged gas tube, but not likely and not difficult to remove and inspect anyhow.

Cheers
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You two just gave me a clue. One, I didn't know some gas blocks were adjustable or that they even made some that are. Interesting. Second, Darkker gives me some idea how to tell when gas could be a problem but not to look at it first thing. Eliminate the other causes first.

Now if I can just remember that, 20 or 30 years from now. lol
 
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