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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Just back from the range with my BSA 15 shooting at steel and paper and my HVA .30-06 on paper working up some Trail Boss loads. Initial impressions are very good. I just had a few questions to ask now that the cleaning is done.

It seems that the first shot of a 5 round group was a low to the right flyer, with the remainder or the string grouping well. I had about a 5-10 minute break in-between strings to cool the barrel. Could this be a shooting technique issue or firearm/ammo related?

In relation to the flyers, should they be dropped when scoring the target as they may not be a true representation of the load?

Secondly I shoot with a 2.5-5 B&L Balvar Scope on my -06 and was noticing alot of eye strain while shooting. I here the best technique is to shoot with both eyes open, but I seem to revert back to only my dominat eye. Can anyone sujest some practice techniques for rifle/scope use?

Thanks and cheers, hope everones weekend went well. Mines a three day, but it's the job list tomorrow....
 

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Was your first shot from a clean barrel? It's not uncommon for the first shot or two to print off from a grouping until the barrel is 'fouled'. If shooting to get an indication of accuracy, always shoot a fouler or two first before you start assessing accuracy. I do this when working up loads, but also before hunting seasons start.

I shoot with one eye squinted, I think. It's one of those second nature things. I'll have to pay attention to what I actually do the next time I shoot! I don't think either way is wrong; whichever works best for you.
 

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Whatever works for ya.Both eyes open help you aquire target faster especially at close range at long range you have more time so it's a wash.You can practice without shooting, in my home I pull the bolt and pick a spot out in the yard or room and see how fast I can get on the target after a few weeks of that you''ll have your sight picture nearly as fast as open sights.Where I HUNT 95% of game is shot well under a 100 yards but I like practice well beyond that in the odd chance I HAVE long shot,so I practice at both long and short range and everthing in between
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Agree with the "fouling" bit. Which is why I don't clean my guns unless: accuracy drops off, or going into storage, or gotten soaked.

As far as the scope part...
Whatever works for you, what I have noticed with some folks I shoot with, they don't look throught the scope; they look at it. If you are constantly shifting focus between the target and reticle, you will strain your eyes.
 

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If someone is learning to shoot a gun with a scope on it, I recommend this techique.

With the scope on low power and the gun empty, practice shouldering the rifle while you aim at a light switch, lamp, or anyother small object in the house or garage. Before you know it, the X-hairs are coming right on target and the gun feels like part of your body.

Once you get that down, practice cycling the action after you get the scope on the "target". After some time you will be cycling the action without losing the sight picture and feeling like the gun is a 5th appendage.

if you have trouble getting the x-hairs on the target without moving your head around, you may need a newer scope with better eye-relief or need to move your scope in the mounts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Your B&L Balvar is an antique isn't it ?
Ya so....:p Is there any way to determine age?


if you have trouble getting the x-hairs on the target without moving your head around, you may need a newer scope with better eye-relief or need to move your scope in the mounts
I was thinking about getting a glass upgrade for this rifle, but I like the idea of preserving it as the tool my father used and the idea that a new rifle would go well with a new scope. As for the eye relief, I can see how this is adjusted but is there a correct distance? Will the scope need to be re-zeroed if this adjustment is made?

Cheers,
 

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This may be an excellent opportunity to get a new scope so you can preserve a family hierloom! Also a very legit reason for scientific research of an optical nature, just in case you have a 'war department' you need to get clearance from. I'm not promoting decietfulness----just scientific research, mind you.;)
 

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Ya so....:p Is there any way to determine age?
Probably not at this date. A fair guess would be 50 years old. Guns magazine has their fifty-year old issues posted on their website, and almost every issue had a B&L ad in it. Might be fun to take a look yourself.

I was thinking about getting a glass upgrade for this rifle, but I like the idea of preserving it as the tool my father used and the idea that a new rifle would go well with a new scope.
No argument from me there -- we think alike. My Model 70 wears a Kollmorgan 'scope in a Stith Master Mount; my Remington 721 and 722 wear B&L 'scopes in B&L or Kuharsky mounts.

As for a glass upgrade, you're going to have to spend some serious money to do that. B&L was the premier glass maker back then, and their 'scopes were state of the art. There are better glass and coatings available now, but they're on the high end.

As for the eye relief, I can see how this is adjusted but is there a correct distance? Will the scope need to be re-zeroed if this adjustment is made?
Just to make sure we're talking about the same 'scope -- does yours have internal adjustments, or are aiming adjustments made in the mount? The early ones were all externally adjusted -- the only ones I am familiar with -- but I think the later ones may have had internal adjustments.

The externally adjusted 'scopes had the cross-hairs in the exact center of the scope and they will not move with focus adjustments.

The eye relief is built into the design of the optics (the way the glass is ground, the spacing of the lenses, etc.) and it is what it is. You may be able to move the 'scope forward or back in its mount to suit your eye position, but you will not be able to adjust it.

The occular lense is movable to adjust for your vision, to put the reticle in sharp focus. The best way I have found to do that is to put the rifle in a rest and aim it at some distant object. While looking through the 'scope and focusing your eye on the distant object (to infinity and beyond), turn the eyepiece until the reticle is in sharp focus and in the same plane. You should not have to focus your eye back and forth between the distant object and the reticle. Once you've got it focused, Bandit's recommendations should work well for you.

The Old Guy
 
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