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Hornady manual warns extra caution when using ball powders for 22-250 (and other cartridges I assume) b/c of temp sensitivity and "excursions." What are y'alls thoughts on this? What is "extra caution?" Was thinking about using AA2460 but don't want to deal with inconsistency. Isn't the venerable 22-250 powder H380 a ball powder?

Thanx in advance and God Bless,
Ryan
 

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Good question. I do not know what Hornady is talking about. Some ball powders are hard to ignite and some (most) are not. Don't know what they mean be sensitivity. I have burnt many pounds of H-380 and over a hundred pounds of pistol ball powders over the decades and find ball powders to work just fine. Maybe somebody else has a clue what Hornady is talking about. If not, it might be worth your while to give them a quick phone call.
 

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What they mean is , don't load ball powders right up to max especially in cold weather because on a hot day it might be too much pressure and start poping primers or have harder extraction. It's the same caution with any powder except ball powder is a tad more temp sensitive than say Varget.
The advantage to ball powder is high energy to density ratio .
Long chemical stability.
Smooth metering in measures.
Disadvantag is slight increase in temp sensitivity as compared to some other powders but not all.
 

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All powders can exhibit pressure spiking in hot temperatures. By the way, the concern is with GUN temperature, not air. Spiking can occur when the chamber temperature heats the powder before firing, regardless of outside air temps.

H-335 is a spherical powder known to spike. I know of three incidents of this, and had one of them myself. Pressures were high enough to freeze the bolt, blow the primer out of the case and swage a belt onto the 223 brass involved. Luckily, the gun and I were not damaged. It was a sub-maximum load.

I no longer use H-335 at all, and have switched to Ramshot TAC which is formulated to be less likely to spike.
 

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Try this:

On a warm summer day, take your 22-250 out, and shoot a shot every thirty seconds, for about 10 rounds. Reload immediately after each shot. Set the empties in a row so you can keep track of them. On the last 2-3 shots, wait a minute between shots.

When you're done, look closely at the primers.

No matter what the powder type is, the last couple of primers will be significantly flatter than the first.

If you carefully load to max, shooting from a cool barrel, and loading just prior to each shot, so the case doesn't heat up significantly, the effect is minimal. If you are running a string at prairie dogs, at long range, and really cranking them out, you might even experience difficult bolt lift in as few as 5-6 shots, especially from those carefully developed max loads.

Hodgdon's extreme powders might be less prone to this, but they are not impervious.

I made this discovery on my first trip out west on an antelope hunt. My .243 got pretty stiff, real quick, shooting Winchester factory loads at my first prairie dogs. I slowed down after that.
 

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Tman has some good advice. Shoot too rapidly and all powders/loads will act differently than when things are cool to warm.

I've often read where ball powders require a mag primer to light off properly. My usual powders are the stick kind and rarely use the ball, so I couldn't really be a good judge of pressure spikes with ball powders. In addition, there's usually a fair assortment of rifles that accompany me to the range so that one getting more than hand-comfortable warm gets laid aside to cool down. I've also taken frozen hand towels to the range in a 12 pack cooler to drape over barrels and receivers to assist in cooling when the ambient air temps out here are above 100 f, which is common in the summertime.
 

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All powders can exhibit pressure spiking in hot temperatures. By the way, the concern is with GUN temperature, not air. Spiking can occur when the chamber temperature heats the powder before firing, regardless of outside air temps.

H-335 is a spherical powder known to spike. I know of three incidents of this, and had one of them myself. Pressures were high enough to freeze the bolt, blow the primer out of the case and swage a belt onto the 223 brass involved. Luckily, the gun and I were not damaged. It was a sub-maximum load.

I no longer use H-335 at all, and have switched to Ramshot TAC which is formulated to be less likely to spike.
Thanks for the input Rocky. Wasn't H-335 a factory powder for the 5.56 in the M-16 back in the 60's and or 70's? I would guess that this pressure problem must have been worse with some powders than others. So is this a ball powder warning or a specific ball powder warning?

Thanks......... Bill
 
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