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Hey guys, i was reading a bunch of books about trappers and mountain men and stuff and in nearly every book there is something about beaver tail. I heard it is really good but have no idea how to cook it. i saw somewhere that you just put oil in a pan and kind of fry it, but im not sure. If anyone has any idea could ya let me know? weird request i know but thanks anyway! :)
 

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Beaver

I’ve eaten it once. Years ago a friend ran a trap line. He caught beaver among other things. We decided to eat one because of those same books. I will say, it was really good! It doesn’t taste like chicken either; very unique, sweet, mint flavor. I’ve never tasted anything similar before or since. I’ve tried eating just about everything a man can shoot, bear excluded. Ask me about groundhog sometime – hideous. The reason we never ate it again: #1. our wives #2. skinning a beaver for its pelt is different than for food. They weren’t worth the double trouble. Try it, you’ll like it.
 

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Beaver is excellent even when skinning the hide for tanning/sale.

This year on the last one we tried the backstraps. They are phenominal and easily obtained and prepared for a hot skillet. Try em, you will like em.

If you have a small one-trim off all fat. Roast just like a turkey in one of those bags.

Large ones can be trimmed boned, ground and mixed w/ cheaper (fatter) beef burger about 50/50 and then grilled. The eaters will wonder what you are feeding them?
 

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Never had the beaver tail. However a friend ran a trap line last winter. He had several beaver. We made it for our wild game feed. It was delicious. It was done very simply in a slow cooker. Can't wait to have it again.
 

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I've eaten a few beaver from the trap line, but never the tail. If you trim the fat don really wll it's not unlike beef pot roast if you slow cook it with carrrots and onions etc. I read somewhere that cooking the tail involves blackening it on an open flame, then peeling off the outer skin and char. I wouldn't be surprised if there is a recipe in The Joy of Cooking. They list some fairly esoteric stuff in there. Check out the 65 pound beaver hanging in my avatar photo.
 

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Son in law was here (with daughter0 last week. I told them we would have surf/turf one night. The first night we had roast beaver. He really got into it.

For lunch two days later we had small steaks and whitefish. I told him-surf/turf. He said "I thought we had that the other night."

Oldest son arrived after noon with 220# black bear. We will have bear roast soon.
 
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